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  5. "あなたのカレーを半分ください。"

"あなたのカレーを半分ください。"

Translation:Please give me half of your curry.

June 26, 2017

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RestRabbitRest

Order your own curry!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StuartRatc

The Japanese like to share!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Da-Di-Dum

Come on! No one likes sharing their curry. #savethecurry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

That leaves half for you. It's quite generous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaranthZi

I would never share my curry with someone else. EVER.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whatwhyh0w

This sentence seems kind of rude. "Give me half of your curry please!" Do people actually say this in Japan?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ApfelLiebe

I believe they don't say it bluntly like that at all. At least, I've never heard of it this way in Japan, unless in a joking manner. This sentence is probably just an example, just like "The evil child is eating a cookie" in Polish language on Duolingo, which gave me quite a giggle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmanuelC16

Sounds like something that could be said in the family or to a partner. Although they probably wouldn't add kudasai xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurros

Probably you cannot leave out the kudasai though? You need some kind of indication that you want it. Otherwise the sentence just says "Half of your curry". I guess you could use hoshii desu, though maybe that is too blunt even for family :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

If you were speaking with close friends or family, kudasai sounds a bit too formal. If you are not speaking to close friends or family, the whole sentence sounds a bit too blunt, even with kudasai.

It's problematic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lmocinemod

I am by no means an authority on this topic, but perhaps the following might work as a joke between close friends/family? 「ねぇ、カレーの半分与えなさい。」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

My version with close friends: そのカレーを半分、私と分けてくれないかな?I wonder if you wouldn't share half of that/your curry with me? (Add puppy eyes because I don't have any cash on me and it smells awesome)

分ける(わける) to share わけてくれる to share (with me)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

I can't help feeling like this sounds like some kind of weird curry "stick-up" - "your curry or your life!!!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Damian33405

That put an odd scenario in my head. "Give me half the money in the register!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Hahahah! Are these the same bank robbers who asked where the bank's exit was?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B_2_H

いいえ。ぼくのカレーだから。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DW021

You should know that "ぼく" is a wery boyish thing to say. Adult men usually say "わたし" or "おれ" (私 or 俺)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imi_imp

saying "no! it's mine!" sounds pretty childish anyway so i think it fits


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CRLoper

I disagree. ぼく is indeed said by boys but adult men say it quite often. おれ is very informal and I've heard moms tell their sons--who picked it up in school or from media--not to say it at all. It's very common among close friends. It's okay to say to people lower in status than yourself of course, but some people frown on it. I personally have had it said to me most by tanned, gruff worker types who are older than myself. In all my time in Japan I've heard わたし the most, ぼく second most, and おれ least.

I learned to speak the Tokyo dialect, however, and it may vary in other parts of Japan. I don't know for sure. People are often more stuffy here haha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittleWhole

I've heard 俺 quite often on interview videos of random Japanese people


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nT2x1

i thought 分's mean is minute


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HTxxD

In Chinese the kanji means fraction, or separating into parts. A minute is a fraction of an hour!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

In combination with numbers, yes. In combination with other kanji, it usually means 'a part/piece'. Such as in 半分: half.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Actually 三分の一 means one third... さんぶんのいち, not さんぷん like 3分 (three minutes) would be. (I save my number kanji for date/time/money etc. for vertical writing.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apple-Nicole

Why is "May I have half of your curry?" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZMYaro

+1; “May I” seems like a more accurate translation than “Can I”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weirdquark

Yes, I'm sorry, using more polite/formal English grammar is wrong with "kudasai"? That makes no sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Because Japanese has more polite/formal expressions than ください coming. You'll have to save some expressions for them too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGameArt1

Im curious, why do the have a dashed line at the end of the word for curry? What is its purpose?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

It means to hold the vowel double length.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Hmm people question whether or not this would actually be said... I think that, in certain circumstances, it may. But, probably, you'll just see someone staring at your curry and hear him say "Oishii sou~" (If I'm getting that right.) Like, "Gee, that curry looks good. Mmm smells good, too. Wow does that curry look good." until you, being your polite, Japan-conformed self, asks "Yeah... Want some?" "Oh, I couldn't... Well, if you insist, sure! takes a bit Oh man this is really good! Mmm it sure is good!" "Just take half. =_=;"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fess22

This is the most considerate mugging I've ever heard of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

I just love this wording. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JomOFisher

I always leave out "of". I think "can i have half your curry" should be valid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adam11546

It not really great English. I think it sounds a bit odd to leave it out


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deathspud

It's perfectly acceptable english!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne92053

Its acceptable spoken english but written english should include the "of"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyGoat8

leaving out "of" is common in America when talking, however, it's technically incorrect.

I'm american and when i talk i wouldn't say "half of your curry," but i still know that it's not correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jazzline

Isn't "Please give me a half of your curry." is a possible answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

Not only is it not necessary, it also doesn't sound right. Saying "a half" is usually reserved for things that already come in halves (rather than a single mass).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koumori72

You don't need to use "a" in this case. "Please give me half of your curry" should be fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Monalisa--

あなたのカレーを半分ください(anata no kare- wo han fun kudasai)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

半分【はん・ぶん】"han bun", "half"

分【ふん】"fun", "minute"

I also think を is romanized as "o", but I wouldn't know because I don't use rōmaji.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaBale17

Why "half" sometimes is 半 and now 半分?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kmn8nKMj

I tried to make 半分 mean thirty minutes as in your curry will be ready in thirty minutes, but I gave up and the hover tips set me right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirRickylton

半分- Wouldn't you say 半 instead of 半分?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

Nope, 半分 is the right word.

半 can be used as a prefix or suffix, but it isn't a standalone word. It needs to be paired with something to form a complete concept. In this case, it is paired with 分 which means "part, fraction", so "half-part". Seems a bit redundant, but that is fairly common with kanji words.

The full word means "half" and can be used as a noun or adverbial noun.

https://jisho.org/word/%E5%8D%8A%E5%88%86


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poulet377889

Get your own curry Duo with all those lingots you like to hoard. Too many lingots; not enough stuff to buy at the shop.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielBat975352

Where is the "give me" part on this sentence... I understand "half your curry please"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

ください means "please give me" or "please do for me" from the honorific verb 下さる kudasaru - to give


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanVR07

"JOEY DOESN'T SHARE FOOD!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

"A half-serve of your curry please" not accepted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CRLoper

I'm sorry to say it, but that isn't correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Do you mean "your curry" like in an order in a restaurant? Sorry, but they don't use あなとの to refer to that in Japanese. Instead, you could say ここのカレー but usually it would be just カレー.

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