"That is not right."

Translation:ちがいます。

June 26, 2017

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ChristosZhu

I'm not sure what's going on here. ちがいます doesn't seem negated, does that imply it actually means 'that is wrong'?

June 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/farukahmet

It's negative in meaning, not grammar. So yes, "That is wrong" would be a more accurate translation. 違い (chigai) literally means "difference, discrepancy" so ちがいます comes to something like "What you're saying is different from the truth", as far as I can tell.

July 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mmolignano
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ちがいます [違います] is actually a verb here in polite present form that means roughly "to differ (from), to vary." Therefore it does not have to be negated.

January 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TanjaR8

Why is そうじゃない an incorrect translation?

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DaymelGarc1

what it if said ちがいません

July 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Twenty-Sev

"That's not wrong."

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelVald2

I think that is "That is not wrong"

October 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelVald2

I think that is "That is not wrong"

October 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/_XxAntonxX_

それはちがいます

November 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/02bookworm04

What's the difference between "chigaimasu" (no jap keyboard, sorry) and "chigaimasuyo"? Does the latter mean "that is right?" or do they mean the same thing ("that is wrong")? And I thought "that is right" is "soudesu" so I'm a bit confused

November 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kifudancer
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The よ on the end is actually a particle. Here it would be used to add emphasis, or impart new information. So ちがいますよ means the same thing overall as ちがいます, just with a bit of nuance.

Here's a link that talks about the two major ending particles: http://www.punipunijapan.com/japanese-particles-yo-ne/

And そうです can mean "That's right", too. Probably literally closer to "That's so," if you want to be more specific.

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Yamm999905

Im not a hundred percent sure but i do know that "yo" means you know. So chigaymasuyo means thays not right you know.

November 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KrKonar
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Hey they use this in one of those anomays

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulJones279857

The よhere just emphasizes the ちがいます - it's wrong- isn't it.

January 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulJones279857

Go

January 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/IssamNassi2

what not "sen"?

January 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MrKittemurt

Sorry, can't type jap. Why there is no "That" in this sentence?

August 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Dylan_Nicholson

The first Japanese class I ever had the teacher would also say "だめです" to mean "not right". I understand it's more like an admonition - "don't do that", but it seems like it should be an accepted alternative in the right context.

November 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristi754702

Agree with Amelia. Chigau is a verb, and chigai is an adjective. There are adjectives ending with an -i or -na. But, I wonder can Chigai really can be a Noun? Amelia? Anyone?

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kifudancer
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Be careful with this one ! :) ちがい looks a lot like an i-adj, but isn't one. It is a noun.

On a somewhat more advanced note, it's also the stem of the verb ちがう. You can get the stem of a verb by looking at the ~ます form and dropping the ~ます. So, the ちがいます stem is ちがい, たべます is たべ, のみます is のみ. I don't know that this is immediately useful here on Duolingo, but you do see these stem forms pop up in some grammatical constructions.

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KajtheHammer

It should be ちがう (adj). Because ちがい (n) means "difference". But still that would just translate "it is wrong". それ わ ただしい ません Is what translates "that is not right (correct)"

June 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kifudancer
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Actually, ちがう is a verb. It's just the casual form of ちがいます. You can sometimes use it to modify nouns, like how in English "to jump" is a verb, but in "the jumping frog" it modifies a noun.

In your second sentence, ただしい is an adj, so it should conjugate as ただしくありません. The whole sentence should read, それはただしくありません. So you may notice I've changed the final い to a く and had to add the verb あります to negate the adj. ~ません is how you make a verb negative (in polite form), but it's only for verbs.

Semantically, as someone else noted in this thread, ちがいます literally means "to be different". It's just also often used in a context of, "That's different (from reality)." So "not right" probably comes closer to the literal meaning than "wrong", but translating it you could probably either.

July 14, 2017
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