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"Please show me a picture of your child."

Translation:子供の写真を見せてください。

June 26, 2017

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronCYA

ダメよ!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbreddit

写真 - photograph


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walgen

in chinese, that means "write real". photo in chinese is 照片. sorry if this is pedantic to some, but as a student of chinese the usage differences are interesting to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walgen

also that wasn't intended as a correction of the above post, which is completely correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkJyD8

Does it become harder or easier to study Japanese Kanji after already studying Chinese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillowsofXihu

In many ways, it makes it easier, as one is already familiar with how characters work and knows many of the kanji already (and can guess the meanings of new ones more easily). The main problem comes with writing, as many kanji are written differently from their Chinese counterparts, so some adjustment and relearning is necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roundhash

Yes. Traditional and simplified characters make it a teensy bit harder to recognize kanji, due to some of the changed radicals.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

The pronunciations of many Kanji are very different from the standard Chinese. Some Kanji meanings are different from Chinese counterparts too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/i.HrcR

It helps you if you already have a firm grasp of one of the two languages and got most of the important Kanjis memorized, but if you learn both at the same time at beginner level, the meaning and pronunciation might cause conflicts in your head :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shihaodu

写真 is also finding its way into the Chinese language as a Japanese loanword now, designating only portrait photos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shihaodu

And in case you didn't notice it: 真 in Japanese is written differently from its Chinese counterpart ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Houngawa

We must be aware of that, because the chinese form may sometimes appears within japanese text, depending on the font being used.
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E7%9C%9F#Alternative_forms


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaphaelNing

FYI, in Chinese 写真 actually refers to a specific kind of photograph, namely portrait. Here 写 means to depict or imitate (a somewhat archaic meaning). So it makes sense that photograph is translated as 写真, because a photos depict real objects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardMad1

Chinese pronunciation of 写真 (xiezhen) sounds like 'session', as in 'photo session'. I'm 75% sure that's the reasoning behind it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul678008

Not sure which course you think you're on but this is Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxSmith630103

I will use this one. A lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denis021299

Moshi moshi police desu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaraUniverse

japanese swat group is coming for u


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

I have learned that someone else child is お子さん.子供 is the speaker's child. Could a native speaker verify it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asaki.
  • 1600

I'm Japanese. You're right. お子さん means others' child in a polite manner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianWill829460

Is this sentence polite? If we are saying "your" child, should we be adding honorifics, othwise it could be "Please show me a picture of 'a' child" (which is even creepier!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMuzzy

Another one of those questions where hovering over a word gives you a kanji you've never seen before and isn't among the options in the answer. This sort of thing is most often why I get questions wrong, because I'm forced to guess.

Does anyone else have this problem, or am I just missing something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dandelionmagic

it's a real problem, when you see it report it as a dictionary hint error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TedMorin

Yep. I resort to checking the dictionary app Jsho. I look up either the English word, or I look up the word bank readings. You end up learning a lot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silmerion

I guess in context you'll probably figure out I'm not asking to see a photo of any random child, but is it common in practice to omit あなた here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emer_Learns

My understanding is that using あなた is not very polite. Someone on another lesson said it's the way police would speak, someone else said it's robotic. If you were worried they'd be confused, say if multiple different children had come up in conversation, you might use their name plus honorific or just a title (like 先生)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli-aiki

I agree with others here that this Japanese sentence (asking for a picture of 子ども) lacks politeness.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Y7qU4
  • 1699

子供の写真を見せて下さい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alec680675

The lolicons are out!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baran121

「何それ?へんたいか、おまえ?」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristophP89013

Why isn't it "しゃしんのこども" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dandelionmagic

i thought that first too but i think that would be "picture's child" instead of "child's picture" and that's why.


[deactivated user]

    I think "child's picture" means something different than "picture of a child". The former would be a picture that a child drew or took.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorgedro

    しゃしんのこども -> Child's picture. こどものしゃしん -> Picture of a child. You have to figure out what makes sense. With の particle the first noun affects the second and "picture's child" wouldn't make sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli-aiki

    They insist on kanji for "ko" but not for "domo" ... Big huge shrug.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

    子供 is often written as 子ども. I've heard that using the kanji for "domo" shows a certain kind of attitude, but I'm not sure what kind. I assume 子ども is the more child-loving version of it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaleshe

    This isn't creepy at all...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin735400

    The answer in English is very specific, but to my limited understanding you could also translate this as "your child's picture" (as in a picture drawn or taken by the child). How off base am I? How would you write "picture made by your child"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DroppedBass

    お子さんが描いた絵: A picture drawn by your child.

    お子さんが撮った写真: A photo taken by your child.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanicWowG

    Could 絵 be used instead of 写真? It says picture, not photograph.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveOoi

    Is that pedobear?

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