"No lo dudo."

Translation:I do not doubt it.

4 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chisoxfan_13

I would do much better with translating if I could understand what the woman is saying. I listened to the last word multiple times and then gave up.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanaknt

I agree, the audio on this one is correct. Here the "d" is probably the cause of the difficulty because although "d" at the start of a single word or start of the sentence sounds hard like it does in English, when the letter "d" is in between vowel sounds it is pronounced a hard "th" (like in the word "this"). So the last word is not "du-do" but rather "thu-tho". Takes practice to get it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/latortugapopular

Every time ''dudo'' appears, I hear ''tuvo'' :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankWaars

Same here... Heard tuvo, not dudo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susanhutch3

ditto

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chisoxfan_13

Thank you so much for this explanation. I am learning Spanish for the first time since my daughter lives in Madrid. I have a mild hearing loss so that makes it more challenging. Your explanation was very helpful, and I'm sure that it will help me in the future. My goals are to build my vocabulary and to train my ear to understand more of what is said.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanaknt

De nada! Glad to help!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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But that "thu-tho" doesn't occur in Latin America, does it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanaknt

Yes, it does. This pronunciation is standard to all varieties of Spanish, as far as I know.

I think the sound you are thinking about that only occurs in Northern Spain is the softer "th" (as in the English "thin") for ce, ci, and z. This sound has nothing to do with the letter "d".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindPradhan

For me sounded like no lo pudo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niccnac

Got the same result. Some questions are like the childs game, where a word is transmitted by whispering and evidently gets so messed up!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas268453

Agree. I changed mine from the correct to the incorrect after listening carefully to the slow version. I am attributing this to my need to work on my ear.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Verde.p

Same with me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marisa4496

Same here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdenney99
jdenney99
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Why is "I do not doubt him." incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

Beats me. That`s what I put. Reported.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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"him" is still not accepted eleven months later. Reported again.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebWeber
DebWeber
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I thought that was right also.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2689327396

it should be right

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Domus87
Domus87
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I instinctively answered that myself, and I think that is one of the right choices, but imo if duo wanted that answer, it would emphasize it as:" No lo dudo a el"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SzemetElek

I have no doubt. Do you think it is wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

You switched verbs. That is usually okay to do in conversation,if the same message gets communicated, but when you're learning you have to be able to demonstrate that you know how to use the subjects, verbs and objects you are presented with. Plus, this is software, not a person.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah.Kerr

How do you say, 'I doubt it'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

Lo dudo. or Yo lo dudo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

Please answer if i should report using him not it and lost a heart

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Megetron25

what about " I have no doubt it"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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You're using doubt as a noun ("I have no doubt" - a thing you don't have) and a verb ("doubt it" - an action on it). You have to choose one or the other.

There are lots of ways to do it though, like "I have no doubt about it" (keeping doubt as a noun and adding a bit of extra descriptive info, to say what kind of doubt you don't have). But that's adding a few extra words, and at least one person tried that sentence and lost a heart!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esha34
esha34
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I hope nobody already mentioned this but.. why can it not be "no i doubt it"?

is it as simple as the because the comma wasn't there? (sigh). Or is it me just using my native English teachings? I just feel that it could TECHNICALLY be accepted. technically.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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As far as I know it would be fine, but then it would apply to half the sentences on the site! No es bueno accepted as "no, it's good!" and the like

Part of learning the language is understanding these inflections, so when a person says a thing you don't take it as the complete opposite of what they meant. That comma (and the inflection it represents) is pretty important! Sometimes the Duo voice can be a bit weird, but I just listened to this one and it sounds fine to me - like the no is making what follows negative, not standing on it's own as a separate statement

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esha34
esha34
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maybe if i had heard it, i would not have answered as i did (didn't have access to working headphones available). so then my complaint changes to they need to put a comma after the "no" (for emphasis and) for those learning by sight. then slowly remove it from more advanced lessons once we get the gist. I usually don't have major problems. but this one stumped me as to why it couldn't be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Oh no, I meant the comma you were talking about (the one that would be there on your version) - a hypothetical comma that would turn it from "I don't doubt it" to "no, I doubt it". Sorry if that wasn't clear!

There isn't supposed to be a comma here because the no is an integral part of the phrase, it's 'attached' to the verb to make it negative (you can get other grammar particles inbetween like here, but they still form a connected whole). You can't lose the 'no' without changing the whole meaning.

Point is this is how you make negatives in Spanish, which obviously happens a lot, so if you hear no followed by a verb pretty soon after, it's probably going to be making the verb negative. Just assume that unless you have good reason not to!

(Like I said your example does work with the inflection/punctuation, and I can even think of some examples where the context would mean you wouldn't need them to be understood, but it's a bit like English students translating a bunch of 'don't do this thing' sentences as the opposite: 'Don't! Do this thing!' You can argue they could technically be right, but they're not learning what they're meant to be learning, y'know?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esha34
esha34
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i get it. i most definitely have the no = negation of verb idea etched in my brain now. thanks for the explanation. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desis111

Would it not sound better, if i say only ....I have no doubts . Learning English and Spanish at the same time

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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They can mean the same thing in some situations, but they might not. What if you don't doubt this thing ("I don't doubt it") but you have other doubts about other things?

It's better to try and write the exact same sentence on Duo, as long as it makes sense! Here the main verb is dudar, so it's better to use the English version (doubt) instead of changing it to have and making a different sentence. That way, you learn to use the verb doubt or dudar, which you can't always translate as 'someone has doubts'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro.Ronaldo

The worst spanish pronunciation I have experienced.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rockypj1

What is tudo?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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In case you're not joking, t and d sounds are closely related, and in some Spanish accents d has a th sound to it (like 'Mathrithd' for Madrid, sort of). I'm not saying the robot voice has exactly nailed this one, but there's a bit of truth to it, you know?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

It always sounds like "tuvo" to me... Guess I'll get it eventually. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liamish
Liamish
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I have no doubt sounds better

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HughAMcElh

i doubt it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vicente773174

His speaking is so slurred it is hard to understand the first time and even the second time, except I knew what it was suppose to be.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlendaSchulte

I cannot understand the man. I listened to his pronunciation of dudo and it sounds like he is saying guda.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlendaSchulte

When the woman does the audio I am able to listen to it slowly when I click on the turtle, but, when the man does it and I click on the turtle it is the same speed as the normal speed.

9 months ago
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