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https://www.duolingo.com/GordonSamuel

Alphabet science

I feel like learning a language would be easier starting from the alphabet.

Thinking back, when first learning english we start with the alphabet and learn how to pronounce each letter and write it in upper and lower case. Next we learn to combine letters to form syllables and hear how the sound produced by the letters changes. Once you have a good vocabulary of syllables you can assemble them into words following rules like "i before e except after c". Then you discover "weird" exceptions to the rule like the word "weird" ;) You then assemble the words you are going to use into sentences and again they follow rules like "'but' or 'and' cannot start the sentence". A huge portion is punctuation, slang, abbreviation and contractions such as "can't, won't shouldn't, etc. Numbers are another crucial piece of language which are essential to the beginning steps. Grammar is then used to take your language skills to the next level.

I once took a spanish class back in middle school and we began learning the same way. Their whole alphabet is pronounced differently and there are added characters with accents. The sentence structure is different, conjugations are different, and there are masculine and feminine prefixes and suffixes.

Anyways i'm struggling to speak or write french because its all different alphabet science. German is similar to english in pronunciation it seems, i just have to memorize my word vocabulary because the syllables make no sense. I'm not really sure how you would implement anything to the existing tree other than an alphabet tutorial when you first start the tree. The vocabulary list could also possibly help break this down for us visually.

4 years ago

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Hi GordonSamuel! Youtube has some great pronunciation tutorials created by native speakers. Don't be afraid to combine other resources like these with your studies on Duolingo. Different people have different learning styles, and when you're on the internet, most things are just a few clicks away. ^_^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alsocass

You didn't start learning the alphabet. You were close to fluent in your native language before you were ever taught the alphabet.

Also, teaching children the alphabet is a highly debated practice. Studies kind of show that if the children learn at home (ie one on one with parents) then they learn whole words (ie because you are reading reading reading to them all the time). But at school with a 25-1 ratio the students learn sounds first.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maria.nils
maria.nils
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French is notoriously difficult to write (just like English, incidentally). I think it's best to regard the oral and written languages as two different systems. There are simply no rules that can tell you how to write a word based on how it's pronounced. Accept this, and you may find a better way to make progress.

I'm not thereby saying that Duolingo is perfect for the task, but I think it should be doable to learn with the existing system. Make sure to read the many good tips in the comments to each sentence.

Finally, it IS difficult, so give yourself some time.

4 years ago