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  5. "この人はだれですか?"

"この人はだれですか?"

Translation:Who is this person?

June 28, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/envylol

Difference between どなたand だれ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KagayakuSeiza

どなた is more formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akalabth

Shouldn't "who is this?" also be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uffefl

That would be a much more natural translation, yes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tubafore

I would agree. Even in the most formal settings, specifying "person" in a who-question is not needed. By virtue of saying "who," we know it's a person being referred to. You would never, for example, ask "who is this lamp?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne427822

You might not, but don't complain when I don't introduce you to Phil, my desk lamp.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaredTafoya

There are situations where you would say this sentence (in English at least). For example, if somebody shows up to your party and is being a loudmouth and saying obnoxious things, you might say, "Who IS this person!" meaning 'who do they think they are' or 'why are they at this party.' It's not a completely useless phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuioVal

I don't think so, the word "person" is explicitly in the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobcatMonk

I agree. "Who" is only used when taking about people. Saying person at the end is unnecessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synargy

Not always. I've heard many people ask "Who is this?" etc when asking for a pet's name for instance. Of course this might be because they are treating a pet like a person, but they are still an animal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

That is accepted now. Who is this person? sounds rather rude in English to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airzae

Who is this... Sassy lost child?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hexonoid

One punch reference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tate1650

When should you use 方 vs 人?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KagayakuSeiza

The main difference is that 方 is more formal, so you would use it in a formal setting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rikkilt

how is Jin pronounced in this sentence? it sounds like "kono shito a dare des ka" - so "shito"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wendy_Cheng

Kono hito wa dare desu ka 人→ひと hito は→sounds wa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanicaBescae

人 is pronounced as ひと(hito) when it's not attached to a country or description (外国人、日本人、etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoriQuaid

I agree that the mechanized speech sounds like "shito". I decided to enter the same phrase into Google Translate, and that mechanized voice pronounced it as like "hito" as you would expect. Then I entered 人 into Takoboto (a free Android app that is a Japanese/English dictionary -- it's great BTW). When I had Takoboto say "hito" the mechanized voice also sounded like "shito". In both Duolingo and Takoboto, the word 人 sounds too sibilant to just be "hito".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngtphu0905

Like if you learned this sentence from LingoDeer as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElmarNieland

What's the difference between this sentence (この人はだれですか) and こちらの方はどなたですか? I got them right after each other without explanation when to use which...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KagayakuSeiza

The latter is more formal. Otherwise they mean the exact same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelOBr3

Who's man is this?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdonisCham1

It's a me! Maaaaaario!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/h1dsaMde

why is "Who are these people?" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steven766818

It was singular. ”These” would be ”人たち”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steven766818

My Japanese speaking friends and I agree, this is a pretty rude sentance lol. The only time you would, hopefully, ever use this is, is if the person you are refering to is out of earshot. In which case "あの" would be more accurate.

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