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"Who climbed up that mountain?"

Translation:誰がその山に登りましたか?

June 29, 2017

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattcfz

その山にはだれがのぼりましたか?

Why not?

I wrote this answer thinking about emphasizing "That mountain". Is it entirely wrong? And if yes, why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara_han

I did exactly the same and was marked wrong, but I feel it should be correct...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MouliZoR

I think that your answer is not accepted because you are placing 「そのやまに」as the subject (using the は particle), while here the emphasis is placed on 「だれ」.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsnell99

It accepts it with just yama ni. Remove the wa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbreddit

その山 (mountain) に誰 (who) が登りましたか (climbed)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElGringo207186

I did だれがその山が登りましたか and also worked


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avidrucker

This shouldn't be wrong either...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7jeny3

I answered this way. It was wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesBaker5

It's accepted now, as of 8/31/20.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epiram

誰がその山に登ったの what is the difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

Did you report it? Still not accepting it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nana.san

Any difference between あの and その?! I wrote ano but it didn't accept...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattcfz

It should accept it.

basically, その is "there" - close to listener, distant to speaker

あの is "over there" - distant to both listener and speaker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewA.Gi

Duolingo prompts you to use その but I'd assume あの should be accepted. Sometimes kanji substitution gives me アの instead, which I'd think is wrong. Anyway, I am amused by the concept of the speaker being away from the mountain but somehow talking to someone near the summit of the mountain, justifying using その instead of あの


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Reneissance

How come I can't use "上り" instead of "登り"? It should be the same word!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

From HiNative:

Eg.

山に登る。

階段を上る。

上りのエスカレーター

We usually use "上る" .

登る is mainly for climbing mountains.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

What is the difference, though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

How is this asked in plain/casual form? "誰がその山に登ったの?" not accepted (and this question is 3 years old, so presumably has a fairly complete list of acceptable answers).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeowMaria87

I omitted the ka and my answer was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

Ending in 登りました? I thought if you used the polite form the か was required...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IRencel

I did the same, by accident. I've heard this in informal speech and knew omitting the か particle is valid, I just didn't think DL would have been accepting such answers by now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesBaker5

This is not informal speech though, this is polite speech, so I have no idea as well why this was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

From Tae Kim:

While it is entirely possible to express a question even in polite form using just intonation, the question marker is often attached to the very end of the sentence to indicate a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesBaker5

Thank you for this, but when would use omit the か、and when is it necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I can't really offer you a clear answer on that. In formal writing the か would be necessary because all sentences end with a 。(question marks are not used), but in speech it's very normal to ask questions with a rising intonation and no か, even when using polite forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I don't know how to explain tones well or where we could find audio of it, but you enunciate the "u" in です・ます when asking questions without か.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

By that you literally mean saying です with a rising intonation? It's such a short sound it's hard to imagine that being done, would be neat to have an example to listen to.
I'm guessing it's far more common for sentences that can ONLY be questions, e.g. 何時です?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snusmum

Was accepted without か (2019 July)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattcfz

No you cannot have は after a question word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lbardo91

Why do we use "sono yama ni" instead of "sono yama de"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0-Jared-0

Because you are directionally climbing the mountain, not climbing at the mountain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skjelset

Why is 「誰がその山に登った?」not accepted? Just because of the past plain form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

It should be correct, I hope you submitted an error report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steve9788

誰がその山に登ったの? Is not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felps_Augusto

Why is "その山には誰が登りましたか” wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemetski_Jetski

I wrote その山に登ったの人が誰ですか? I think I can already see some issues with this but need help identifying grammar errors or determining if this is even a valid sentence structure. I feel like I've seen this structure in other sections and it was the first one that popped into my head for some reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

That's "Who's the person that climbed up that mountain" - the meaning is essentially the same as it should arguably just be accepted, but just as there are some subtle differences in English between when you're more likely to use one form vs the other, presumably there are between the two different Japanese structures too.
(One slightly far-fetched but at least clear example - in a fictional/future world where you could ask such a question of an animal or a robot, you wouldn't ask "who's the person"!).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mgaristova

Would 誰がその山に登ったの be wrong?

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