1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "午後七時にばんごはんを食べます。"

"午後七時にばんごはんを食べます。"

Translation:I eat dinner at seven P.M.

June 29, 2017

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pirangaba

I am so proud of myself I got it right :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fukurou_Sa

大変よくできました!^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamScott794079

Huh. Nihongo word for "meal" apears to come from rice. It makes sense, since rice is of course a staple food in japan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aafd

Similarly, in English "meal" can refer to a grain, as in oatmeal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aipe97

I never noticed that!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schmatte

Me neither! That is so cool!!!! Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lz_Ayala

「午後七時に晩御飯を食べます。」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k4cid

Why "I have dinner at 7pm" is not correct, not a native English speaker but always thought "have dinner" is a more formal to say it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enathanael

Yes, I do agree. It is a common way to say 'having dinner' than 'eating dinner' or such


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilNolan1

Being formal doesn't make it wrong. Besides I think in my past of the US we say "have dinner" all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LudovicusH

Actually, i hardly think anyone says "I eat dinner" in English. The thing here is that in Japanese they say "I eat dinner" (which can be noticed by the 食べます).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sum_Gai

I use "eat" and "have" interchangeably when talking about meals, but they are different words, and the verb 食べる translated is "to eat" not "to have."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChadAllen99

I actually say "i eat dinner" not "i have dinner"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamiemeow99

What's with the spaces between numbers and am/pm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VariusKidd

That's the correct way to type times in English. It's informally spaced variably nowadays because people wanted to save space in text messages or save time in instant messaging. Otherwise, it's just convenient more than it is proper grammatical formatting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbPorter

They use the verb "to eat" not "to have", so it's safer to translate it as it's written.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hugessfan

It's sad that I spelled "dinner" as "diner".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sum_Gai

As a financially stable single person living alone, I'm starting to get that way too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davedavido

A couple weeks ago I would've had to listen to this twenty times. Today, I listened to it once and knew exactly what it said. Daily study is worth it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeMartin271676

"um" was one of the words listed in the English word blocks to use. What does it mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilNolan1

Um is something you say when you're trying to think of what to say. Like a pause. Japanese uses "ano... " a lot for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carol208629

Why is at 7p.m. before the object, i thought the object always came first in japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sum_Gai

Object always comes before verb, not first in the sentence. From what I understand about the particles, it's always topic/subject は/が location/timeに direct object を verb[conjugation].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FAlter5

This is the first time it did not accept me using another pronoun in my answer although the Japanese text does not provide a hint who the one eating is. I wrote "We eat dinner at 7:00 pm" and it said "I eat dinner..." is correct. Well, just another report for me...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/setsuk4

In some of the answers, it doesnt accent p.m/am but in this one it does? I should've got this right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DreamingSimon

"I have dinner at 7 pm." marked wrong for "have" instead of "eat" and "pm" instead of "p.m." Seriously?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zyriab

What's the difference between dinner and supper, in English ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sum_Gai

I think that question will start a flame war. For me the only difference is how they are spelled. For others, dnner is mid-day meal. For others, supper is mid-day meal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

Growing up in Ohio, my family always used supper to mean something lighter than dinner. Not sure this is the official answer though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EJL242000

Can we leave out 午後 here like in English (i.e. I eat dinner at 7)? I mean, it should be quite clear to everyone that dinner is eaten past noon (evening)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nihonSpoon

I don't understand the use of に.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p7CH3

Why we can't write I eat this dinner at seven P.M.?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DawnChesbr

Used "7 o'clock in the evening" and got it wrong. It means the same thing in English, just my translation is more formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbPorter

It means the same thing, but they specifically wrote 7pm. If they wrote out 7 o'clock in the evening then that's what you would put. Here they used the counter for pm so you have to include it in your answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sum_Gai

Pretty sure 晩に七時 would be what you were translating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theresa280444

I wrote "I eat dinner at 7:00 p.m." and was marked it was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbPorter

Its correct as of August 10th


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HazelCheong

What is the difference - I eat my dinner at 7 pm and I eat dinner at 7 pm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyourin-for

what is the exact function of "を" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/v49mha2k

をis the direct object marker. When you use an "action verb" (aka a transitive verb), you mark what is receiving the action with a を. So for example, "eat" and "drink" are transitive verbs.

In this specific example, ばんごはん (dinner) is the thing that is receiving the action - the thing that you are eating. So you mark it with a を after it.

Another example would be "I drink water." Water is the thing that you doing the action - drinking - to, so you mark it with a を. In Japanese, お水をのみます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JJINGflowe

Why "Afternoon seven o'clock" is not right...

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.