"It snows."

Translation:雪が降ります。

June 29, 2017

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaRuud

雪が降ります。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ei283

So it basicly says "the snow falls down"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hE4S2

Yes literally like that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paurtemanto

Why can "降ります” can both be read "furimasu" and "orimasu" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rosemarymo4

Shouldn't "雪が降っています” be accepted? The same sentence with "ame" was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Are you sure it was the same circumstance?

雨が降ります。(ame ga furimasu)

It rains. (talking about weather in general, as in "this is a place that gets rain")

雨が降っています。 (ame ga futte imasu)

It is raining. (current condition)

So in the case of this sentence, the difference is the same:

雪が降ります。 (yuki ga furimasu)

It snows. ("This is a place that gets snow.")

雪が降っています。 (yuki ga futte imasu)

It is snowing. (current condition)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rosemarymo4

It was the same circumstance. With "It rains" the -te form was accepted. Here it's not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcdx3

Does anyone ever actually say, "It snows" ? So confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

What do you mean? I'm going to assume you're looking for context.

"It snows every day in Hokkaido."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shellax

ます is simply non-past. The sentence can mean "it snows" as well as "it will snow".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Weather is a special case where the future tense shouldn't be used as a translation. You can't know for sure how the weather will be, so you can only make a prediction about the future.

雪が降るでしょう。

Yuki ga furu deshou.

It will (probably) snow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margaret641889

You are right. In English we typically say "It is snowing" for present tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

That would be 雪が降っています (yuki ga futte imasu).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrvolans

Wait, what does furi mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"Furimasu" is a verb used with precipitation that means "to fall".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lita757268

ゆきます and ゆきがふります what is different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert121815

ゆき is a noun, not a verb, so you can't just conjugate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

There is no verb "yukimasu" that means to snow. Only "yuki ga furimasu" means "it snows / it will snow".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/singfromth

Someone correct me if im wrong but i think ゆきます is very vague because there is no topic marker. The translation would be like "snow, it (something else?) exists" the particle が is used to indicate we are definitely talking about snow as the main topic and ふります means "it falls" so ゆきがふります more literally means "snow falls" or translating to english "it snows" because english likes to verbify nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenLloy4

Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the main difference is that ゆき means snow when used as a noun. As in ゆきがあります - "There is snow" or ゆきです - "It is snow" so you would need to include a verb like ふる in order to say "snow is falling." I am not sure what the verb is for "to snow" ゆきます, I am less familiar with unfortunately, but I find it in the form of 征きます、meaning "to conquer."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

雪が降ります。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Itlandm

A wild kanji appears! I am very sure yuki was spelled in hiragana when I learned it, but now I review it and it has evolved into a kanji.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosVEEGM

行きか降ります


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FatimaMusawy

It's Yuki, not Iki, iki means to go


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/No--One

The "行" in "行き" can be pronounced as either "い" or "ゆ". That said, "行きか降ります" uses poor grammar and doesn't make sense either.

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