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  5. "もうすこし大きいメガネがほしいです。"

"もうすこし大きいメガネがほしいです。"

Translation:I want glasses that are a little bigger.

June 29, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

Is it common to spell 眼鏡 in Katakana rather than kanji?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swallama

From what i understand, there are a few words that the Kanji is either not widely known, or too complicated for writing, so they use katakana instead


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

then why did DLJapanese introduce it at the very beginning of this lesson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

apparently both are used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaLangosta

Both are quite common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

もう少し大きい眼鏡が欲しいせす


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yaolinguo1

Can someone explain the もう here since I thought it means "already"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thkgk

It's part of the word もう少し (もうすこし) which means: a bit more; a bit longer​


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ObitoSigma

But what does the もう serve? 少し on its own can mean "a little more..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Data594575

To my (limited) understanding, sukoshi is "a little", and mou give the "more "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelso_Hogan

もう means "more" in this sentence. You want glasses that are a little more big. It's equal to the "-er" in "a little bigger." Without もう in the sentence, you would be saying that you want glasses that are a little big (implied for your head), which is a very weird thing to want.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noraleo_

Where does メガネ derive from, 目 ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

The kanji spelling is 眼鏡 (眼 also means "eye", 鏡 means mirror), but etymologically speaking it should probably rather be 目金 "eye metal". Apparently the medieval Japanese coined their own word for "glasses" but rather than use the corresponding kanji they seem to have chosen to adapt the Chinese two-part kanji word as a whole (Chinese where 鏡 could also sometimes refer to lenses).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Williamspete001

眼 is more often used in medical terminology as it can't refer to other things (目標 etc.) Also 眼 on its own means pupil and is pronounced まなこ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James151779

Thanks. I was confused over that also, since I was expecting the メガネ to be a more obvious "loan word." Again, thanks for the explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goren17

Does "bigger" here mean literally bigger or optically stronger or can it mean both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nush_W
  • 1672

The 'Bigger' in this sentence is referring to physical size, rather than prescription strength.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/surrealpie

why is メガネ using katakana


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nush_W
  • 1672

You will usually see it written as 'メガネ', especially in advertising, where Katakana adds emphasis. Plus the Kanji for 'Megane' is a bit of an eye-test (眼鏡) ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenStad1

"slightly" should also be a valid translation here, I'd think?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff566572

I want bigger glasses isn't accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

No, that ignores the すこし part of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbreddit

Would もう少し not change it from just 'a little' bigger to something more?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginkkou

No? もうすこし means "a little more", so もうすこし大きい just means "a little bigger".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivalaashutosh

Spectacles wasn't accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Considering I don't see a lot of people choosing that over just "glasses" in casual conversation, I don't think that's a natural enough translation.

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