https://www.duolingo.com/Skutir

He terminado el árbol de español.

He terminado el árbol de español en cuarenta días. I like the environment and wish there were more. People in my dreams now speak Spanish.

I'm sure this has been discussed a lot but one way to really enhance Duolingo activities is to have activities that are not translation based. There are the speaking/transcription activities, but they are both limited due to speech recognition and imperfections with the robot lady voice (though I do think it's impressive how good it is.) I mean more like, short stories or vignettes in the target language, questions in that language, and you have to respond in that language. The uploaded translation documents might be a good place to start, because developers could just add questions in the TL and some multiple-choice type answers. More advanced learners could gain XP by writing those questions and answers.

A good "Bonus" feature for the Spanish section like the idioms and flirting modules would be emphasis on the differences between European Spanish and Latin American Spanish.

Just some thoughts! This has been a very good experience, especially for free and without advertising. I also think the discussions are the friendliest I've ever seen on the Internet.

4 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Berend
Berend
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I just did a similar post (very happy with Duolingo, but):

Problems arise however when the language becomes more informal, watching the telly (especially comedy) or listening to conversations between Spanish friends. I wish there was some way that Duolingo could help me with that! I feel like am still missing some language essence in order to communicate fast enough and keep up.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skutir

Thanks, Berend... are you a native Spanish speaker learning English and French?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berend
Berend
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Native English, living in Spain, learning Spanish (and a bit of French).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skutir

That explains why you went through the Spanish to level 17! I thought maybe it was for quality control. No better way to learn than to be living there.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aicaramba

I agree with what you are saying. Duolingo does a great job teaching the basics, but when it comes to conversations with natives, it is not enough. My girlfriend is a native Spanish speaker and when I try to have conversations with her or her friends I just get lost. They speak so fast and I still have to really think about which verb conjugation means what, especially in past tense or in other advanced tenses. Duolingo is good enough that I can somewhat follow conversations, but knowing exactly what is being said and actively participating in conversation is still too much for me. I'm using other methods to improve my Spanish and I rehearse the harder sections, hoping the advanced verb tenses come more natural over time. Also, I often don't know a word or how to say a specific sentence, but I think that's rather normal, considering duolingo only teaches a 'small' amount of words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juliestarling

Felicitaciones!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Skutir, I am always curious and ask people this, are you planning to take the reverse tree? I found that the Spanish reverse tree was more challenging and some of the vocabulary was different. I don't know if that is because they used it rarely in the Spanish for English course and used it more in the English for Spanish course, or if it really is new vocab. I think the first option because Selcen_Ozturk mentioned that there is a set number of words one learns for a course (https://www.duolingo.com/comment/2315080) . But, I really have to wonder about the reverse course vocab banks..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skutir

I heard other people talking about that... I guess I'll try it. I'm busy enough keeping my bars up; it seems like every time I return another has faded!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

It almost seems unbalanced sometimes. For instance, you've just completed a unit and the next day it instantly has lost one yellow bar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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40 days seems good to me, I think I will finish mine approximately within this limit of time. I prefer to slow down sometimes to be sure the new things are stuck in my head. Not too fast, not too slow.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I took 90 days myself. Though, for my own learning needs, I wish I had taken probably 140 or so days. Right now I'm going back through my tree. The reverse tree taught me that I had some areas that I really just didn't understand and had confused. So, I'm glad you suggested the reverse tree to Skutir. It was an important experience for me. ^_^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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Something is lacking on Duo, more stats. Because you do your tree, but you can't review it to see where you struggled. Imagine you have some stats, the number of times you tried, the success percentage or the times you manage to pass it with all your hearts, very motivating!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skutir

I am far from done learning Spanish!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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Yes, you should do the reverse tree. And I plan to do the tree again when I'll finish it, but trying to get a 100% score for each lesson. What's a pity we can't track it in Duo...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrCaren

I love duolingo. I have taken placement tests recently that place me at "advanced 1" level (on average) after just about 5 months using the program. I have tried to learn spanish at several points in my life, and did not manage it even when I lived in Belize for two years. Of course, the official language there is English, but with so many spanish speaking people there, I thought I would pick up more. If I had duolingo back then, it would have really allowed me to take advantage of that experience. What is a reverse tree? I am still learning a lot from keeping my tree "full" but I wish there were additional lessons to help me continue to build vocabulary, and maybe some "slow spoken" stories so I could practice listening and comprehending as I go. I also think it would be cool if duolingo had some form of chat capability for people who want to "patiently" attempt to have real time conversation in the target language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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The reverse tree means taking English for Spanish speakers. After completing a few skills, I found it to be more challenging than learning Spanish for English speakers. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aicaramba

I did the placement test for the Spanish --> English tree and cleared everything except for the final three sections. It was not that hard I think.

4 years ago
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