"Do you have plans yet for the weekend?"

Translation:Hast du an diesem Wochenende schon was vor?

6 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Alphathon

One of the "correct" solutions is listed as „Haben Sie Pläne für das Wochenende?“. Would that not just be "Do you have plans for the weekend?" rather than "Do you have plans YET for the weekend?" I can see how they'd be interchangeable in some circumstances, but it doesn't seem like an adequate general (sans context) translation. The other answer presented, „Hast du an diesem Wochenende schon was vor?“, doesn't mention "plans" at all but rather seems to (as far as I can tell) be more along the lines of "Do you intend to do something/anything at the weekend yet?". Again, this may convey the meaning but is not equivalent.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shifu2012

noch is a very wicked word :-

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LB_StorM

How do you differentiate between noch and schon? Would noch work here?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

noch = still, schon = already, yet. Noch would work, if someone had plans, something happened and those plans became uncertain.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LB_StorM

But noch can also mean 'yet', no? "ich bin noch nicht fertig" - "I am not ready yet"?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

Right, I missed that, sorry. "noch nicht" = "not yet". Noch is something that continues from the past, literally: I'm still not ready. I think nicht only translates to yet in negations. Ich kann noch nicht sagen, was passieren wird – I can't say yet, what will happen. Without negation, it's still: Ich weiß noch, wie wir uns kennengelernt haben – I still remember how we met. Does this work for you?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LB_StorM

Oh ok I get it, it's because in this case "still not" wouldn't work like in "still not ready". Vielen dank.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vitoreiji
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Why can I not use "bereits" instead of "schon"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dfblaze

Doesn't bereits literally translate to "already"? That's kind of the complete opposite of the sentence

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenbajr
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Opposite? schon = already

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nictheman
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"was vor" - I'm not really sure how this phrase is used?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alphathon

It's not a phrase. The vor is the separable prefix of vorhaben - to intend, plan etc. The was basically means something (I think it's technically a shortening of etwas).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nictheman
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Ah thanks buddy! The separation was so far away that I never even thought of vorhaben (Also because I'd never learnt that verb before :P). Makes more sense now.

4 years ago
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