1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "ちがうおみせに行きましょう。"

"ちがうおみせに行きましょう。"

Translation:Let's go to a different store.

June 30, 2017

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

違うお店に行きましょう


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arcferrari248

違うお店に行こう。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshGabrie2

First one is formal, second one is informal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbdullahIsmile

In the anime "Attack on Titan", I often hear them say "ikozo" or something like that for "let's go". Where does it fit? Is it also slang?
Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David208499

It's probably 行くぞ (ikuzo). It does mean "go!" or "let's go!", sort of like 行こう, 行きましょう or the imperative 行け.

See https://jisho.org/search/zo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

People often say 行こうぞ too, or ぜ, etc. It's very strong willed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-CaptainCoconut-

It's only used in anime, in real life it may be used ironically by natives when they are pretending to be an anime character, but not seriously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alec.Fitzgerald

Is there any subtle difference of meaning between 違うお店and 他のお店?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginkkou

It's the difference between "another store" and "a different store".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiceSato

so which is which? can you give more details pls?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaserDuck

違う-ちがう different 他-ほか another


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monocake

doesn't chigau mean "wrong"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Itlandm

It means different. Instead of saying "you are wrong", polite Japanese will say "it is different". Think of it as "it is different from what you think" so in other words you are still wrong, but no harsh words are used. The English phrase "you are wrong" is actually quite insulting. In Norwegian we say "Du tar feil" (you take error) as in you take a wrong turn or make a mistake. We do not want to describe the person with a negative word, just their actions. The Japanese do not even go that far. They just point out that reality is different from what you say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DylaC

I'm confused by this as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/romcheek

Can mise be without the o in front of it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffWhite373278

Yes, but it is more casual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James151779

So, should it have been accepted by Duo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaserDuck

I think it should be accepted if it hasn't been.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jerran8

Whats the difference between "lets go to a different store" and "lets go to different stores"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Most nouns don't have a different plural form in Japanese; it just depends on context. I think technically this sentence could mean the latter as well.

(Also, you forgot the apostrophe in "Let's" both times.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne427822

The first implies you're going to visit a different store to the one you're in. The second implies you'll visit a range of stores.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neddo5

I had the same question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orion-the-Red

The first case is more used. It would be used in the case of changing from one store to another in the same mall. The second case would be a very dissatisfied person who wants to go to another set of stores entirely - or possibly the case where the speaker wants to split up from the listener and go to separate places.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mrop4

What is the pronounciation of "different" supposed to be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanjaR8

When "g" appears in the middle of a word, as in ちがう, it becomes a nasal, soft "ng" sound like in "king". When "g" is at the beginning of a word, it sounds sharper like in "game".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artifex421

Is this use of 違う a common thing? I learned it as a godan verb meaning "to be different" or even "to be incorrect" How is it being used here in adjective form?

And wouldn't words like 別な or 別個な be more appropriate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butsuri

I think it's a relative clause: "a shop that differs".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

Yes, it's very common, in this case in particular but also as a general grammatical structure with other verbs. And then you're on the train and they use that crazy formal form: 開きますドアにご注意ください。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukas637195

All those hats are chewed on, lets go to a different store


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David208499

It is, but a verb clause can be used to modify a noun, similar to how we say "moving car" or "boiling water" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenJammin234988

My dog sells hats there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lea584371

When do I use ちがう and when ほかの?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cecil164832

Explained above- the first is "different," the second is "additional." In this context, the meaning is the same, but in other contexts, you would use one or the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

"Different" or "another"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouroboratika

Could this also be read as "We will go to a different store"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

No. That would be 行きます, not 行きましょう.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouroboratika

Ah interesting, so the ましょう form of verbs is more of a command and the ます form is more of a declaration then? I think I misunderstood this in an earlier lesson and I took it as the group form of a verb. Like, 食べましょう. I took as "let's eat".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

It does mean "let's eat", among a few other possibilities. The -ましょうform is known as the volitional form, and it used to express many things relating to desire, will, and choice. You can read more about it here: http://selftaughtjapanese.com/2015/02/17/the-japanese-volitional-form-しよう、〜しましょう-more-than-just-lets/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouroboratika

Good to know, thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

The command form is ましょ whereas ましょう is the volitional, like the English shall IMHO. Take for instance the rarely-used question tag for 'let's': "Let's go, shan't we?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pichaliiin

Why に instead of へ? Like going "into" other store?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

As someone explained to me quite recently へ is used only for place, but に has other connotations. Here the location of the store is not what's being referred to.

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.