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  5. "週まつはかん国に行きました。"

"週まつはかん国に行きました。"

Translation:I went to South Korea on the weekend.

June 30, 2017

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary564031

"Over the weekend" sounds much more natural than "on the weekend" to me, but it was marked incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mccollumj

I came here to see if anyone else complained - over the weekend is a set phrase, I feel like. In American English we say "on saturday" etc, but to describe an action that took place "over the span of the previous weekend" we say "over the weekend"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Grammatically correct, but pragmatically suspect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csvicc_

韓国 only refers to South Korea? What about North Korea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

北朝鮮

Kitachousen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

週末は韓国に行きました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarneyHoll

At the weekend marked incorrectly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohannesRu793051

"At the weekend" sounds weird to me while "on the weekend" or "over the weekend" both sound natural to me. Is it British English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

Three months later, still no change. All these "on the weekend" forced translations are painful. ^^;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hilary2

At the weekend should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aichan154267

AT the weekend is perfectly normal in a number of English speaking countries. USA uses ON the weekend


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margaret711539

On the weekend is American English only


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahBell274952

I'm an American and it doesn't sound right to me. I would use over the weekend, or maybe rarely during the weekend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregFlemin1

I agree. I might say "last weekend" here. Neither at the weekend nor on the weekend sound natural to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McKenzie165433

How is "on the weekend" different from "I went to South Korea this weekend"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

I went to ROK for the weekend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pahko_

Why did Duo only give us half the kanji? I know 国 is one we've seen before but still. Half the word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

国 is a kanji Japanese children learn in the 1st or 2nd grade, while 韓 is an advanced kanji that they don't learn in elementary school, so it would be normal in an elementary school classroom or a graded reader to see it written this way in Japan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/negell

Welcome to Korea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

where they don't have kanji


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

The last time I was in Seoul (1978), the top story headline contained only one hanja: 北, a convenient abbreviation for DPRK.

BTW hanja are still used for names of people and places.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

It's ridiculous which Kanji are accepted for this - trying to type it with the IME requires constantly switching back and forth between modes! No good reason it shouldn't just accept 週末は韓国に行きました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Was it a "type what you hear" question? The contributors are aware of the problem and would like something done about it as well - forum link. You can use the word bank to get around the bug.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanmcfarlane115

The voice is pronouncing 国 as koku, is that correct?? I thought it was kuni.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Kanji have different readings, and sometimes the voice does choose the wrong reading, but in this case it's correct.

国 (kuni) - country

韓国 (kankoku) - South Korea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

It's both. Like 人 is びと and じん.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Is "I went to South Korea for a weekend." acceptable or would that be translated differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

For me, "the" works better.

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