1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "Are there yellow flowers blo…

"Are there yellow flowers blooming in the yard?"

Translation:庭に黄色い花が咲いていますか?

June 30, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EltonOgoshi

Shouldn't be で instead of に?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

I have the same question. Blooming is an action so it shoild be de, shouldnt it. Its not like the japanese sentence says rheee are blooing flowers in the garden. Instead it says the flowers in the garden are blooming.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

I think it should as I hear blooming as coming into bloom since flowers don't bloom, the plants that bear them do. The Japanese with に is used for what I'd render, "Are there yellow flowers having come into bloom in the yard?" Or more commonly, "Are there yellow flowers in bloom in the yard?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linksta35

I believe that "blooming" is just the state of existing for flowers. Just like you'd use あります on a person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aramishureaux

I know this isn't the point, but you don't use あります on a person, you use います.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cantouche

In : に at : で after I'm not Japanese but it's like that I've understood it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

No, "in" vs "at" is very much an English-specific thing where it depends on the nature of the space, and even varies from dialect to dialect. Kids can play both "in" and "at" the park (you'd use で for both in Japanese) and you can be "at" home (家に), and talk "in" Japanese (日本語で) etc. etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XiaoLiu02

黄色いの花が庭に咲いていますか。 this should be accepted. i asked a couple of my japanese co workers and they said its the same meaning as the one in the context. well..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oskeith

I think your mistake here is that you used 「黄色いの」。黄色い is already an i-adjective, so theres no need to put a の to attach it to 花. You would do that in the case of some other colors, like ピンク色, which can take a の, a so called "no-adjective".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JezImpbox

Shouldn't this be あります not います?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KagayakuSeiza

This is not a case of using the いる/ある "to exist" verbs. It is a verb conjugation indicating continuous action, and is created using the "て" form of a verb plus いる (or います to be formal). It doesn't matter that the flowers are inanimate because this sentence is talking about what the flowers are doing, not just that they're there.

So:

さく (さきます) = to bloom

さいている (さいています) = to be blooming (continuous action)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianTepes4

Why not 庭に黄色い花は咲いていますか?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwright874

How would you ask if the yellow flowers, which you already know exist in the yard, are blooming? Would changing が to は serve that purpose?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayyanSheh1

にわにきいろいはながさいていますか?

Niwa ni kiiroi hana ga saitei masu ka?

《咲き • さき》Bloom

《花 • はな》Flower


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

piggybacking your comment...

「庭に黄色い花咲いていますか?」is more natural and is already accepted as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vlad852942

Isn't the Japanese version more like "Are the yellow flowers blooming in the yard?" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.qW7NdO

Why do we first use color and yhen flower ,shouldnt flower go first then cllor


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KagayakuSeiza

No, the adjective goes before the noun it modifies is Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MFf611

I don't understand my answer is exactly the same as the corrected one and I have my answer wrong?''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

Try pasting your answer and the given answer into the same text file on subsequent lines - there's almost certainly some subtle difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teemu191333

What's wrong with「庭に咲いていて黄色い花がありますか。」?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dleal93

庭に黄色の花が咲いているの?shouldn't this be accepted?

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.