1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "I eat green rice."

"I eat green rice."

Translation:Ich esse grünen Reis.

March 6, 2013

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egdir

I eat it with my green eggs and ham.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/borQhuester

Sagte "Sam ich bin"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izzitty

Why can't it be "grünes Reis"? :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magicfiresnake

Reis is masculine. Grün gets an -en ending because is Akkusativ, strong decclension. Google about german djective endings...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex.tjn

My dictionary says Reis is nutural. "n. (das) rice, seeds of a tall marsh grass native to warm humid regions (used as a staple food throughout the world)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

According to dict.cc which I've heard many German professors recommend as a great internet source, der Reis refers to the grain, but das Reis refers to a graft or sprig of wood.

Occasionally in German you'll find words where a different gender confers a completely different meaning. I had a school teacher in Germany explain to me how even native German speakers will sometimes confuse das Schild (street sign) with der Schild (battle shield with your nation's crest on it).

It's confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamiaELSharkawy

Da(s)treet - De(r)evolution maybe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pauliiw

The "n" stands for noun. Reis is infact masculine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/supu1

"Das Reis" pl. "Die Reiser" is indeed a german word; it's a synonime of "Schössling" , "Trieb". Of course when one speaks about eating one think about "der Reis" but if one speaks about "eating green rice" then an educated german could even think about someone eating "Reis" with the meaning of "Schössling, Trieb"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 217

then your dictionary is wrong. There does exist something like "das Reis" (n.) in German, but this is an archaic expression denoting something like a branch. The plant used as food is "der Reis" (m.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sgtluax

I can't wait to walk around Berlin with a T-shirt of this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albertlr

How comes Ich esse grüne Reise be wrong, when i have inflected my adjective after the plural noun. Rice is countable in German, is it not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sgtluax

The adjective will also take the accusative ending when that something is receiving the action (assuming the Verb will take the Accusative form).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albertlr

Yes, I did think about that. Assuming the declension of the adjective is strong (there is no article), the ending would still be -e, even when in accusative - right?

Could it be something about that you can not say rice in plural in German, or am I completely lost here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukePender2

Accusative masculine ending is -en. Reis is masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albertlr

Yes, I am aware of that :-), but rice in English can both mean the singular and plural form of Reis, no?

If both are correct, then you should be able write the plural form, and decline the adjetive after that??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 217

rice is not countable in this context (like milk, fish and so on). Same in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eise101

*Ich esse grünen Reis (singular Masculine accusative), same in English and Dutch. Und z.B. Ich esse grüne Nudeln (Plural Feminin accusative).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickBarber2

If Rice is plural, wouldn't grüne Reis work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronWalle2

The question is, how do you say "rice" in German? Singular or plural? I think in all the examples given so far, it's been singular. If they don't say it in a plural way, then doing it that way would be like saying "I eat green rices". Which could be valid, but the meaning is different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronWalle2

And it might be "Reisen" but I'm not sure, would have to look it up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

No plural of "Reis" it isn't a countable noun.

"Reisen" is the plural of "Reise-journey"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charlotteee333

I never know if it is ein, einer, einen, einem or eine???? If I did I would be much better at German because at the moment I'm just guessing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sbester

I wrote grünes and it accepted it, although the right word wad grünen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 217

It was online "accepted" because it was considered a typo. It ist dringend nevertheless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alizmo

Ich esse den reis. Ich esse den grünen reis. Ich esse grünen reis. Any Idea??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 217

What are you asking about? Those are three different sentences, in English
I eat the rice.
I eat the green rice.
I eat green rice".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JmHayot

Ich esse den grünen Reis? Why is it not countable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 217

"rice" is of course not countable. You can't say "one rice, "two rices", ...

But this is not the issue here. You used the definite form ("den Reis", "the rice") here where there is no article in the English sentence, so there should be an indefinite form in German as well ("Reis", "rice").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohanShiju

TIL Green rice is a thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rross87

I have trouble with plurals here, why is it "Ich esse grünen Reis" but another phrase in the exercise was "Wir sehen grüne Schuhe". Why does one end with -en and one with just -e?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 217

"Ich esse grünen Reis" is not plural. "Reis" is a (masculine) singular mass noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steveh.

Colours is the most difficult part of learning German I have done thus far. I am struggling with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_subash

Why it is 'grüner' reis? Bcoz rice is a masculine..we use der..but why they use den here? And how?? Anyone clear me!

Thanks in advance

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.