https://www.duolingo.com/John701175

English- Spanish for non english speaking persons

I am Danish and i am trying learn spanish - not english Duolingo is not available in danish and have to use the english version of Duolingo.

When i translate some spanish text to english, i get a lot of wrong answers, because i made minor mistake in the english translation, like writing "a " where it should have been "an". I could not care less. It is annoying to have to focus on another languish then the one i am interested in,

July 1, 2017

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Heike333145
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Here you have the chance of improving one language while learning another. I think this is a double benefit.

In my opinion, a language-related site, in particular one that teaches languages, like Duolingo, has to implement and encourage correct language use everywhere.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Oritteropo1
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I'm a native English speaker and I also sometimes get exercises wrong because I got the English part wrong. Usually from not paying enough attention...

Once you feel a bit more confidant in Spanish, choosing to learn from Spanish will mean it cares much more about Spanish. Obvious choices for you would be English from Spanish (the reverse tree), or Catalan.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
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Heike333145 and Criteropol are both right.

Oritteropo1's suggestion of doing the English for Spanish speakers course is a REALLY good suggestion for someone wishing to practice Spanish, as most responses will be in Spanish. Try it, and you'll probably really like it, once your Spanish is good enough (and it does not take much). And should your Spanish be not quite fluent enough, you could take the time along the way to translate any Spanish instructions you don't understand yet, which will help improve your Spanish all the more.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dsjanta
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Maybe you could try memrise then. Maybe there are some Spanish courses you can learn directly from Danish.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Peztis
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And I am Swedish and I agree with you totally!

I understand the benefits of learning English at the same time as learning another language but it also means when trying to grasp grammar or things you just have to learn that I have to go from Swedish to English to Spanish or the other way around.

I am not saying that Duo should be more lenient with the English or such. It is just sooooo frustrating sometimes!

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Heike333145
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I can understand your frustration (and also the frustration of John who started this thread). The best solution would be if Duolingo offered courses from all languages to all languages.

But since this is not viable at the moment, we have to use what is at our disposal. And so we have to say "certain language pairs are not available yet". So we should do the best in the situation we find ourselves in, and I think the best is taking the perceived disadvantage (I have to deal with English although I don't want to!) and turning it into an advantage (actually, it's great that I'm encouraged to use proper English, too, because this will help me in many other situations, regardless of the specific purpose of my language course). Any other way of thinking just increases our unhappiness.

This is just my experience.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Peztis
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I am more that grateful for Duo! I agree in all that you say and I learn a lot of English along the way. But sometimes it is harder to grasp the difference between two words or expressions when there is a language in between, so to speak.

July 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Oritteropo1
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I have been trying to use a monolingual Spanish dictionary first, for that very reason, and then only consult the bilingual one second when I didn't understand the Spanish one :)

I don't think there is only one right answer, many paths end up at the same destination.

July 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
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https://www.memrise.com/de/courses/danish/spanish-spain/
https://www.memrise.com/de/courses/danish/spanish-mexico/

If you do not use the "all typing" user script from Cooljingle, the offical Memrise courses 1-7 will disable typing >=15 words letters by themself, so it will be much easier for you to learn Spanish.

I guess that might help you a lot for your English, if you would choose the https://www.memrise.com/de/courses/english/spanish-spain/ variant where you have not to type that a lot like you have to do on the DuoLingo website.

For my Portuguese courses my setting is, that I only type the target language "Portuguese", when I translate something.
So for the 6 flower planting steps the excercises might be source/target mixed, but for reviews the target usually is Portuguese, not English.
At least in my setting with all the installed user scripts on the web site.


If you would use DuoLingo on the Android app, e.g on Bluestacks (Android emulator, Windows PC) you would be much more focused on tapping and "finding two word pairs from two rows" excercises than typing.

If you do the reverse tree Spanish (source) -> English the focus is much more on Spanish.
But that may have changed on the new portal and new Scala code, what the exact mixed ratio between Spanish and English is.
However, it was the case for the old Duo portal.

July 2, 2017
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