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  5. "He is Mr. John's uncle."

"He is Mr. John's uncle."

Translation:かれはジョンさんのおじさんです。

July 2, 2017

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkaland

Mr. John still sounds super-weird to me. There are English dialects that do this, but...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

If translating this sentence from Japanese to English, it should be acceptable to leave it out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

It's possible that the person's last name is "John", but otherwise, yeah, where I live we don't address people by Mr. (first name).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PadiS46

How can you tell when hiragana will only be accepted and not kanji? かれ  彼


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

It's a magical guessing game until every single error has been reported and dealt with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JugglerNorbi

This guy duolingos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GhBar

Is the かれは really needed here? I omitted it and got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blain34723

I would think that omitting it would imply that you (the speaker) are John's uncle, rather than a third party. It seems necessary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

In context you can leave it out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

They probably want to introduce this concept of attaching a title to a given name. When I taught in Japan they would call me Gabriel Sensei or Gabriel San all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eph.

Pronouns like he/she (kare/kanojo) are usually omitted in Japanese. (I studied Japanese in college and lived there for some time and am just doing this as practice, to give my bona fides.) I think it's really weird that Duolingo insists on it. People who talk like this in Japan are going to get some strange looks.

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