"Mr. Tanaka is Japanese."

Translation:たなかさんはにほんじんです。

July 2, 2017

25 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrowsVeldt

I always forget when to add 'wa' and when not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tlrcmbs

Same, anyone have an answer as to when 'wa' should be added?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airzae

It's used to mark the topic of the sentence (or the subject if the topic and sentence are the same)

If you're not using it, the subject of the sentence should be clear from context.. 田中さんはたべました。(tanaka ate.) 田中さんをたべました。(someone ate tanaka) 田中さんたべました。 (Doesn't mean anything)

A common time that you don't have any particles is with desu (です). In English we use 'it's' for this purpose. This is because desu isn't a verb. 田中さんです。( [It] is tanaka.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siddarth168311

So it comes after the subject


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UnknownOta

No it comes after when ur talking about a person it goes defferent when talking about something like a place


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woif

I guess it's when you refer to someone. In this case Mr Tanaka -> he's Japanese

So basically Everytime you talk about someone other than yourself except if you mention yourself by adding watashi then you have to use wa as well.

This is as far as i understood it by now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xandaros

Japanese is all about context. "Mr Tanaka is Japanese" could also be written as 日本人です。 This only works, if you were already talking about Mr Tanaka, though, since otherwise you wouldn't know who you refer to. (In fact, the default context is yourself, so you would actually be saying "I am Japanese")

To introduce a new context, you use は. Therefore, 田中さんは日本人です means "Mr Tanaka is Japanese". If he was already the topic you could just say 日本人です as mentioned earlier. If he was already in context, but maybe not the main subject right now, you can use が to make him the current subject, so 田中さんが日本人です。 However, if you do that without Mr Tanaka being in context, it sounds like you are surprised at this fact.

The difference between は and が is confusing a great many learners; you will develop an intuition for it eventually. Luckily, simple sentences without any context generally only use は.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaddyOP

I am a complete newbie but I am trying. But why it is that in some cases the Japanese is translated in English from the right side while in some cases it is from the left side. I am confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucasLopez352889

Depends on the translator, but in Japan, people read from right to left, in contrast to America, from left to right. At least I'm almost certain its like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teacher_Jorge_

Is the topic particle WA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlos.val755414

Why is 中 pronounced as "なか" when its descriptions say its ちよう?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilhelmAntunes

Some kanjis have diferent types of pronunciation, the one you are talking about has 3 different manners: なか,ちゅうand うち. I don't the rules about how to chose in each case, but I hope I helped at least a little bit. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airzae

Kanji have one set of readings when combined with other kanji (Chinese, or onyomi) and one when they are not. (Japanese or kunyomi). Some of them are the same for both and some of them have many readings for reasons that are not obvious. Compare

中国 (Chuugokuk 中 (Naka)

There are a bunch of more complex rules governing which words use which ones。Body parts are notorious for only using kunyomi readings with other kanji; the onyomi for east (東, とう) is thrown out the window when combined with mouth to form 'east entrance/exit' 東口、[ひがし]ぐち


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TsukuyoGintoki

Kanji have different readings, called kunyomi and oniyomi. They are also bringing attention to the 中 in 田中 and how it is also used in 中国 but with a different reading.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatsow

Isn't it more appropriate to say nihon no kata instead of nihon jin while talking about someone else or is it just used to be more polite while asking someone directly about his or her origin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airzae

Nihon no kata has the same meaning but is more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freyr69

When is it correct to use です and ます and anything I've missed? I've been a bit confused by this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manaia549413

desu is the "be" verb of japanese, it means is/am/are. imasu and arimasu mean "it exists". imasu is used for living things while arimasu is used for objects, for example: if the teacher was checking attendance and called your name, you would say "はい, います” meaning "yes, i exist". but if someone was asking, for example, if theres a train station in your town (えきがありますか) you could reply with ”はい, えきがあります” meaning "yes, the train station exists" hope that helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larissa918888

Wa isn't really needed here. The topic is clear from context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarryD90

Thats what i was thinking. The subject is obviously about Tanaka so why do we need 'wa' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily_Slaybaugh

It's used to mark the topic of the sentence (or the subject if the topic and sentence are the same)

If you're not using it, the subject of the sentence should be clear from context.. 田中さんはたべました。(tanaka ate.) 田中さんをたべました。(someone ate tanaka) 田中さんたべました。 (Doesn't mean anything)

A common time that you don't have any particles is with desu (です). In English we use 'it's' for this purpose. This is because desu isn't a verb. 田中さんです。( [It] is tanaka.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p7CH3

Why is "さんは" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K-Yennie

That is a term of respect. Its like the English term Mr.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoelEscalante0

Why don't we add しゅっしん ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1GBu7

but i know only hiragana what should i do ?

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