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  5. "このおはしはすこしふといです。"

"このおはしはすこしふといです。"

Translation:These chopsticks are a little thick.

July 2, 2017

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gathoss

乇乂ㄒ尺卂 ㄒ卄丨匚匚


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

According to Google Translate: your extra thicc = ultimate scales

For 巳メ下尺卂 千廾工匸匸 it says "Timeless Thunderbird"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JahredW

Underrated comment


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluFoot

haha this comment made me laugh I mean me too thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

what language is that? doesn't look like chinese or korean


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigFlamer

thicc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

このお箸は少し太いです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danial702692

Pro tip: don't rub your chopsticks together in a store. It's rude to the store owner. Means that you're implying he's supplying subpar chopsticks by checking for splinters. http://justhungry.com/your-guide-better-chopstick-etiquette-mostly-japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chibika1

I would err on the side of caution in any case, but does that also apply to disposable chopsticks? Are reusable chopsticks common in Japan? (I hope so)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AesusV

I would tend to agree, but after living in japan for a while, ive seen a lot of japanese rub their disposable chopsticks together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mactuary1

What's the difference あつい and ふとい? Is it like the difference between 薄い and ほそい?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Yes, "atsui" and "usui" are for flat object like books, while "futoi" and "hosoi" is for round objects like pencils.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regularfanb0y

"Atsui" is hot or warm right? So I'm guessing that the "Atsui" for books have same pronunciation BUT different kanji? Please correct me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Yes, you're right. 暑い (atsui) is hot weather, 熱い (atsui) is hot to the touch, and 厚い (atsui) is thick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamomNF

What is the difference between ふといです and ふとっています regarding meaning and usage ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReisenII

ふとい is an adjective that means "thick, fat", while ふとる (your example in the -て form) is a verb that means "to gain weight"

Their meanings are different, and so is their usage being an adjective and a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/x13nn
  • 1128

Why chopstick, not bridge? There is no Kanji :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

Remember never to use bridges to spear food.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

You don't usually put お before the bridge...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suetois

The clue is the honorific "o." Hashi is a bridge, but o-hashi is chopsticks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lerosbif

No self-respecting Japanese person would use thick chopsticks! XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe598286

Sorry for interrupting all the T H I C C N E S S, but I think "These chopsticks are a bit thick" should be accepted as well, like in previous lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Josh940085

accepts "these chopsticks are a little THICC" as an answer lol

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