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  5. "かぜがつよくふきます。"

"かぜがつよくふきます。"

Translation:The wind blows strongly.

July 2, 2017

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yugenli

So tsuyoi became an adverb by switching "i" with "ku"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keppinakki1

Yep, that's how it works with i-adjectives


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snailwood

and here i thought it just switched to -く when you were negating it. now I'm starting to better understand, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoriK22

in order to negate, the adjective has to end in くない (plain form) or くありません (polite form)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koumori72

Polite form is just adding です つよくない (plain) つよくないです (polite)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Either polite form is acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

@feelingelectric: It would be incorrect to combine ありません and です. ありません is already a verb; you don't need the です copula on top of that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

There are multiple levels. つやくない, つよくないです, たよくありません


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

@feelingelectric Even if some Japanese people are using that, stacking multiple polite forms is grammatically wrong and you shouldn't do it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

風が強く吹きます


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Draqul

Why isn't "the wind is blowing strongly" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanjaR8

The verb conjugation is different for the -ing form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarali.for

What's the -ing form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koumori72

Verb + ています。in this case, ふいています


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/casimirthegreat

While that may be true. In the case of a general truth about the weather today, it should be an acceptable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shellax

Translation =/= interpretation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

It is now. I'll have to leave the explaining to others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shagrazir

On a previous question i was told the proper answer is "a strong wind blows." Being a good soldier, i entered that on this question and was told i was wrong. What do you want from me?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArashiNL

Pay attention to the sentence: つよい風 = strong wind

つよくふきます = to blow strongly

It's important to note what the adverb/adjective is describing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

It's accepted now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeWillisUK

Even after all these lessons I still struggle to differentiate when a topic or subject particle is needed.

What would 「かぜはつよくふきます」mean? Would it change the actual meaning of the sentence or just shift emphasis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Changing が to は might shift emphasis or change the implication depending on context, but either translation should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denis021299

I also think は should be allowed here, the meaning would be "As for the wind, it blows strongly" - which matches the meaning of the sentence. Could anyone verify if this is correct/explain why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

What would you be contrasting with, that doesn't blow strongly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radatouy

This sentence is about me when I eat Taco Bell.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

風が強く吹きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rael763700

"A strong wind blows" should be correct.... The answer given sounds unnatural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

That's not what the sentence says. Read the rest of the comments in the thread. 強い風が吹きます would mean "(a) strong wind blows"; this sentence says 風が強く吹きます, "(the) wind blows strongly". Changing つよい to つよく and changing the position turns it from an adjective into an adverb, turning "strong" into "strongly".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandon801875

Although you're right from a literal standpoint, I don't think that was Rael763700's point. He said that the correct answer sounds unnatural, and he's right. There's plenty of other times in Duolingo when nonliteral but more natural sounding answers are accepted.

There's more real world merit in giving a natural translation especially when it doesn't change the meaning, so I would agree with him that "A strong wind blows" should also be accepted as a correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

If we are to resurrect 1+ year old comments, then here are my two cents: I would argue that in the use case of Duolingo - learning a new language - it is essential to differentiate between things like adjective/adverb, because if you do not and instead accept more natural translations, then you could end up confusing the user.

Also, I think that this sentence was ill-chosen and another sentence with more natural English translation should have been chosen for presenting learners with Japanese adverbs. Hopefully the reworked Japanese tree will prove better in this regard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyo2018

風が強くふきます(what's the correct kanji for fukimasu? )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellieplants

i just said the instead of a?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cbrit

Because of the が particle, couldn't this also be translated, "Wind blows strongly" as in, "in general"? It was counted wrong for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

No. GA just is just the way how you say grammatically correct how the wind blows.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I.gor1

A strong wind is blowing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

"will blow"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImTheonecoolguy

Shouldn't "Wind strongly blows." be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FastOlMilkcart

what is windy in japanese? is kazegatsuyoi not just that? it is windy, seems a proper translation to me. help please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eyamakurenai

Google just said "I will wipe the cold"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdonisCham1

Why can't the wind blow warmly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deepfriedmcrib

There's no good reason that "the wind is strong" should not have been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakata_Kintoki

Yes, there is. "The wind is strong" is not an exact translation since it's missing the verb (to blow).

The wind is strong. = 風が強いです。

The whole point of this sentence is to learn / practice adverbs and the verb "blow".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aijox3

Wouldn't it be fair to also say the wind blows hard? -_- in english, both answers have the same meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asderekk

Yeah, no one says the wind is blowing strongly... The real life translation should be the wind is blowing hard...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/borffffff

Is "the wind will blow strongly" also correct translation for this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

I find it hard to imagine a context where it would be. If you're talking about climate change, maybe "強く吹くようになります. If you're predicting tomorrow's weather, you'd probably go with ふくでしょう (probably blow) instead of ふきます.

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