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  5. "水がたくさんあります。"

"水がたくさんあります。"

Translation:There is a lot of water.

July 3, 2017

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EXPLICITLANGUAGE

Describe the Ocean...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

Why ga instead of wa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HolomorphicShawn

The subjects of the verbs ある and いる both take が


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freyr456924

This made me more confused. ある? いる?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImADorkIDo

ある and いる both mean "to exist", but ある is used for objects and plants while いる is used for animald and people.

The polite form of these is あります and います, the things you see at the end of the sentence sometimes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dennuzz

"a lot of water, there is", Yoda-san


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonkeyBrains

"ありますたくさん水が" - 日本人ヨダさん


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GewoonLeonYT

ございますありがとう


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yemi.jr

Ga indicates subject being 'water', Wa/Ha indicates topic which would be the fact there is 'a lot of it'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenJammin234988

What to say to the plumber.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert931915

You could certainly, and quite correctly, say, "There is much water." It would sound a little stilted, so you might say it if you were being facetious, for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChicknParm

I can now describe Wind Waker in Japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jay.hammer

Is it wrong to say 'There's much water'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaei

It sounds unnatural in English. It's better to say "there is a lot of water" or "there is too much water" depending on what you're trying to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlitosMiranda

Not the english course, but: "Much" should be used in negative sentences, questions or with a negative particle. In day-to-day english people may use it in positive sentences but itvis rare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/circumbendibus

A lot of times people will take the reverse course to get more advanced practice in the target language because you have more exercises where you compose in the actual language you want.

But also, nice explanation. I didn't even realize that about my own language!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex_wei

It is perfect English, though it may sound a bit formal or old-fashioned. It should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxy477008

me when i go to the beach


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuroumi

たくさん means a lot? Are there similar words that require different conditions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ratfink88

Could this also mean "I have a lot of water"? I've seen "arimasu" also be used when referring to "having" something...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trissbrook

I guess, if you add 私は (わたしは) before the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaBale17

Would たくさん水があります be correct? If so, should I still use が or は?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelBoy535994

I put this and it was marked as correct. Not sure if there is a meaningful semantic difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angel766341

that's good that there is a lot of water. stay hydrated y'all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/penumbrak9

That's Hoenn for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chandelair

Why is "there is enough water" not correct? Doesn't takusan imply 'in abundance'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffT1234

"Enough" doesn't necessarily imply abundance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandon.ha20

I mean those are kind of different concepts. "Enough" is like "the right amount" or "a sufficient amount," whereas "an abundance" is more than enough, maybe even too much. Saying there is enough when there is an abundance is a form of sarcasm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yzuzqWGo

Can I translate it like "We have a lot of water"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrazedSwed

Earth in a nutshell


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeAnn918744

"Day after day, day after day, we stuck, nor breath, not motion As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean Water, water everywhere and all the boards did shrink Water, water everywhere nor any a drop to drink." Samuel Taylor Coleridge, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pleitezl95

Would takusan mizu ga arimasu work to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZokkoMan

Maybe "takusan no mizu ga arimasu" Idk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidOland6

Nestlé wan't to know your location.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KVELLER

The guy from the other sentence must be in hell right about now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeWalker46

The way she says it is so funny. "水がたくさん.... あります。" It's like she's upset and speaking in short, quippy phrases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Omg_Ein_aLLa

I translated it as "I have a lot of water" and I imagined a dude sitting in a Date and he sais this to impress the partner. I dont know why, but that was my first thought and I had to laugh so hard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoshingSam

Its called having a tap (or faucet if you're a weirdo)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShotoAizaw1

Umm... Isn't it a "Family 2" unit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jackarie

Last words before drowning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/virtualtester123

I do not know that 'There are a lot of water.' is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaadRock

Could this also have been translated as, "I have a lot of water."?

Given that 〜は is not provided, it could be "understood" that the topic is referring to the speaker ("As for me, there is a lot of water.") Or am i misunderstanding something?

I know that "There is a lot of water." probably makes more sense in just about every scenerio where this sentence might be applicable, but i would like to have some clarification as to why the alternative would not be a correct translation, given the lack of context.

I assume the "There is a lot of water" translation only works as a response to a sentence that has already clarifed the topic, rather than a sentence that stands alone or is used to start a conversation-- because 〜は would be needed for clarification if one where to change the topic of the conversation.

Am I correct in these assumptions, or am I forgetting something fundamental here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nightbane30

7/10 too much water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tranquocth4

I typed this and Duo still accepted: "I have a lot of water"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erica_adj

There is a lot of water or I have a lot of water? What is the best translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsIreneAdler

水が好きじゃないです 。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raspymorten

Ehm. Correct me if I'm wrong. But "Misu" is suppose to mean like "cold water" right?

Like specifically cold water?

Also, with it being used here, I'm assuming that means it can be used to just mean cold water in general. And that if I'm saying this, I'm not actually saying "Boy, there sure are a lot of cold glasses of water out here!"


[deactivated user]

    So the sentence is mizu ga ta ku san aromas? Or taku san?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freyr456924

    Mizu ga takusan arimasu

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