1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "この本は長いです。"

"この本は長いです。"

Translation:This book is long.

July 3, 2017

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aeovis

Silly contribution: If you have trouble remembering which is long and are fond of mythology or tabletop gaming, just think naga = long. Because snakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nominusJPG

I'll remember Nagini, Voldemort's snake :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuffBlunts

That's exactly what I thought for some reason but it works!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielGarr830049

I never put the two together, but I looked it up and learned that nāgini is Sanskrit for "female naga".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ka_ktu

Ah! Sanskrit....interesting. Tq for the info


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thebluebow

That's an awesome mnemonic, ty!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VitaRey

And the kanji looks like a guy holding a banner for another snake cult. It helps me haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanAmongMany

And here I was, tinking of Usopp's nose


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/omiana04

I think that's why Indonesian call "dragon" as "naga"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrimed

Does "long" in 長い mean exclusive long as in this case or also physically long as in a long line. Could you use it for a long train ride as well or would there be a time specific one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

長い also means "long" when it comes to the length of objects, time, and distances.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedAli825240

It's a contextual word then !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satwita

Just like English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyGoat8

I have the same question you do and i didn't find an answer...

does

長い本

mean that it takes a long time to read, or only that it's physically long and not wide?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felix315091

As far as i know, its a physically long book.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkaze

Long = nagai


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kartikay217032

Long long maaaaan

さけるごみたい長いさけるごみ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

To memorize the character for "long" well; it looks like a man facing left with long hair.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouGJnQDxR7U


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevadensis

Can this mean long content-wise? Like saying it has a lot of pages, besides than just long physically?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

sorry for posting multiple times, I wanted to help both people

It can mean both, though one could assume a long book to be long content-wise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john990735

It does mean long content-wise already


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinha_joy

長い sounds like nanai to me. Why does the "g" sound change sometimes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Because the Japanese が-set sounds a bit like "nga", though it's represented by "ga" in romaji because that pronunciation is somewhat closer.

Nonetheless, the "nga" is still present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magicman950643

この本は長いです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattPiecho1

この 本 (ほん) は 長 (なが) いです It can mean both that the book is physically long, as well as it is commonly used to say that the book takes a long time to read. (I confirmed with a native speaker.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemetriaVH

So, I wrote this answer earlier on a different question, without the "desu" and it was accepted. How necessary is the "desu" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

です = polite version of だ = to be

長い(ながい) = long, works like a verb in Japanese ("to be long")

Since ながい already states something is long, you don't need it at all, grammar-wise, but it's considered very polite to add the です in any case!

With these kind of polite sentences, only conjugate the necessary part, not the added です! (e.g. 「この本は長かったです。」 = "This book was long." / 「この本は長かったでした。」 = バカ外人(=goofy foreigner) stuff


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlos265539

partially true, the problem is です cannot always be replaced with だ、for example in questions or with い adjectives

For example, おいしいです, in informal you would use おいしい、never おいしいだ

Correct me if im wrong, im still a ビギナー


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramantsuuu

can we put "na" instead of "desu"?

この本は長いな?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver747900

No, if you were to have a "na" at the end of a sentence, it would be "da". "Na" is just the connective form of "da": what you would say if you were putting another noun after it. If you were to say that the flower was pretty, you would say, "Hana ga kirei da." But if you were to put the word for "flower" at the end, you would change the "da" to "na": "the pretty flower" would be "kirei na hana".

And in any case, you only do that for so-called "na" adjectives, and "nagai" is not one of those.

So-called "i" adjectives have the "da" or "desu" built into them, so to speak, so you don't need to put "da" or "desu" after them, grammatically speaking: "Kono hon wa nagai," would be a complete sentence without anything after the "nagai".

You can say "desu" after it to make it more formal, but grammatically, you don't need to.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJ2EhSPLQsk
Japanese Adjectives i and na - secrets they never tell you! Four facts that make adjectives easy
21,067 views•Dec 9, 2017
Organic Japanese with Cure Dolly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kawaiineko177

But what does "desu" mean


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamettiFogliuti

Literally, as I understand it, it means "to be equal to, to be the same as". It's translated with "to be", because in the end the meaning is the same, but it's not actually the verb "to be". It's more like the = sign.

私は学生です -> "myself = student" -> Regarding myself, I'm equal to a student, I'm exactly the same as a student. Translated: I'm a student.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisaLipkin

It is not necessary for understanding, however desu is a polite way to end a sentence, and unless you are talking to family or close friends it is always better to include desu than to exclude it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freyr456924

If I remember correctly, its a matter of who you're talking to on what you can drop.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

You're absolutely right!

When you need to be very polite to someone, say talking to your boss or school director for example, definitely add the extra です!

On the other hand, in casual conversations, such as when you're talking among friends, you don't even need to put necessary です's! (e.g. 「あ、、、バカ外人は!」 = "Ah... Goofy foreigner", incorrect Japanese, though it's understood to be "Ah... I'm such a goofy foreigner" after making your so manieth grammar blunder totally not out of experience nah... )

Also, kudos for Rem, Emilia best girl though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sam31111

This book is long in its dimentions or in its context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

sorry for posting multiple times, I wanted to help both people

It can mean both, though one could assume a long book to be long in its content.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanWold

Could a long book be a large book (marked wrong)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FordA44

I believe there is a distinct difference between long and large


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MQfjb

この本は長いです『このほんはながいです』


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkaiKonekoChan

Nagasaki city in Japan 長崎 = "Long Cape"

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.