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  5. "三週間かかります。"

"三週間かかります。"

Translation:It takes three weeks.

July 4, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

Why 週間 and not 週々 like in other of the exercises?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I assume you mean ヶ as in 一ヶ月, not 々 as in 時々. (々 is an ideographic iteration mark, indicating that the previous kanji should be repeated.) The kanji ヶ (pronounced "ka") is apparently a graphical abbreviation of another kanji, 箇, used as a counter for months, places, or provisions.

As for why 間 is used for some spans of time and ヶ is used for others, I don't know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crystal754779

What is the difference between 三週間かかります and 三週かかります?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kozumes

間 is the counter for weeks. its a measure word. for example you wouldn't say "one bread", you would say "one slice of bread". the difference is japanese has measure words for time as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeWillisUK

So...

「三週間かかります」 It takes three weeks.

「三週間かかりました」 It took three weeks.

What about "It WILL take three weeks"? ... Just curious =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PholaX

三週間かかります


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Japanese doesn't differentiate between the present and future tense, so "takes" and "will take" would be translated the same way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokawa1

No future in japanese, you have to guess it through context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

If there is no future in Japanese, Why am I bothering to study it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASleepingRock

Because you're bound to make the same mistakes if you don't learn from the past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m0rya

So do learn from the past and make a whole different set of mistakes ( 人︶∨︶)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adunlap1337

The difference between "it will take" and "it takes" is context, there is no difference in how you'd form the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/runouce

English is the one who's based heavily on the "when"

The time is just simply not that important in some other languages


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanaLife

さんしゅうかんかかります


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Okappys

It takes for three weeks. Please tell me why this is a mistake, native English someone. 日本語の3週間は three weeks とfor three weeks の、意味があります。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

When you say "it takes [an amount of time]," "takes" is transitive. It needs a direct object, the amount of time that "it" takes, like "three weeks". An intransitive verb would make this sentence correct. "It happened for three weeks," for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Okappys

Thank you very much. I noticed a mistake. In this case it was a transitive verb. ^_^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloArias470876

If I were to guess, because 間 is the counter for weeks and 週間 did not have other meaning like 10月 has


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/comeoutcomeout

So why was "it took 3 days" just mikka kakarimashita, and not mikkaKAN kakarismashita?

I'm confused by this structure...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adunlap1337

If I understand correctly, "kan" is being used as the counter for weeks, and "mikka" is specifically used to mean three days and does not need a counter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaueJ.

I've been told that 三日- みっか means the "third day of a month" and 三日間 means the "period of three days". I am still confused about why Duolingo is using it differently though.

Also I've seen people using 間 to count days, weeks, months and years. I don't know if it's exclusive to count weeks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

三日 (みっか) means both "3rd day of the month" and "a period of three days".

3日間 is also "three days" but rather than a length of time (during which something is happening), this indicates a 'frame' of time within which something can happen (often followed by で).

And 間 is indeed a counter for all things time related, from seconds to years - not just weeks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ekusuplosun

間 Noun, Suffix 1. interval; period of time​ その芝居(しばい)  は6ヶ月間上演(かげつかんじょうえん) された。The play ran for six months.

source:https://jisho.org/search/%E9%96%93


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokumaker

How is the kanji counter word for time pronounced here? The audio sample sounds like "ha" or "han," but these kanji audio samples are unreliable and I can't seem to get the character to come up with I type out those sounds in hiragana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

三週間【さん・しゅう・かん】

there is a table in this article with the ones for weeks:

https://www.learn-japanese-adventure.com/japanese-numbers-durations.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MessSiya

三周間 = about 3 weeks??

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