"This bento is good."

Translation:このおべんとうはおいしいです。

July 4, 2017

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EliasPs
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There is also "umai" (美味い) that men/guys use mostly instead of oishii.

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KurenaiRozu

I got it right but what is the differenxe between Obento and Bento?

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Obstructor

It seems like the O is something you throw on if it's the first word or your trying to be more polite.

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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Yes, お is a polite prefix in this sentence (similar to ご, in some common expressions).

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaens
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For your own usage, just remember to definitely add "o"/"go" if whoever you're talking to had made the lunch in question or is otherwise responsible for its presence before you :) Some words even have synonyms for this instead of just getting o/go on them: say, "(my) son" and "(your) son" sound completely differently.

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartRatc

Is ii(good) okay to describe food?

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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I think that might not work for describing food as tasting good, but I'm not sure.

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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This is correct, you shouldn't say that food is いい.

May 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nich227
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この弁当は美味しいです。

February 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rchive2

Why is べんとう translated as "bento" in English? Typical American English speakers don't know what a "bento" is (unless I'm missing something). Wouldn't "boxed lunch" or something be a more appropriate translation?

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
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I wouldnt know what a boxed lunch is. It's always bento. I am from NZ and have seen this used in the UK and Aus.

July 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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If it has a wiki, I think it's standard enough (though of course not all English speakers will know the word). "Boxed lunch" should also be accepted and seems to be the standard translation of "bentou". I will say that I would never use the phrase "boxed lunch" and am not even sure what it means outside of the context of being an English translation of "bentou".

February 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kurros
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Plenty of English speakers know what a bento is. Just depends if they've ever been to a Japanese restaurant in their life. Same goes for lots of foods in other languages; nasi goreng, thali, kim chi, paella, etc. It doesnt make sense to translate most of these. People can just google it if they don't know the word.

February 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex567371

Why ha and not wo? I always mix them up...

January 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GhBar
Plus
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は denotes topic and is really an unfamiliar case for native English speakers (at least for myself). My favorite translation is "as for -." In this case このおべんとは - "as for this bento (sounding proper)" おいしいです。"it is good." Then after another step, you might rephrase the sentence as something more natural, "as for this bento, it is good," - "This bento is good." The prevalence of this cased is pretty mystifying to me and I would imagine most native English speakers, because after the rephrasing step, it seems to take many different forms. を on the other hand is mostly consistent with the direct object, the thing an action is performed on. "I eat rice" - "ごはんをたべます。” However, there are some concepts that are conveyed very differently in Japanese compared to English. For example, "I like rice." In English, rice takes the same case as the previous sentence: the direct object. In Japanese however, the verb for "like" - 好き is different than in English. I think of 好き more like "to be liked" or "is pleasing." In which case, you can use が or は to make the sentence "ごはんが好きです。" - "(speaking for myself) rice is liked" which you would rephrase as "I like rice." Which might be the root of your confusion. In light of this, を and は are quite different.

December 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaens
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Because they're so completely different, it's hard to answer. It's much easier to get ha and ga confused... Basically は sets a topic, and を is like "I be doing things to this".

January 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/derincay

is the お before べんとう really necessary?

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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No, it's not.

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KurenaiRozu

*difference -_-

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sora_Japan
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They are same. 'Obent' is 'o' add to the noun 'bento'. A little polite. 'o' or 'go' are used to 'noun'. you can find same case when you continue Duolingo.

update( ˆoˆ )/

They are the same. 'Obent' is 'o-' added to the noun 'bento'. 'o-' or 'go-' is used with a noun to make it a little more polite. You will see more examples as you continue the Duolingo course.

I forgot 'the' before 'same'. oh... I can not write the hat on the letter. ō (←this is the copy)

July 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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*They are the same. "Obentō" is "o-" added to the noun "bentō". "o-" or "go-" is used with a noun to make it a little more polite. You will see more examples as you continue the Duolingo course.

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sora_Japan
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Thanks a lot! I fixed!

September 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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Regarding the ō, it was easy to type for me on mobile by just holding my finger on the "o" key. I'm not sure how to type it (besides copy/paste) on my computer. You don't technically need to use it; it's just a different way of romanizing the おう sound (instead of "Obentou", as it's spelled in Japanese).

September 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sora_Japan
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German multiple letters have two dots like hair ornaments on the top. It is not line but two dots. It was my memory wrong. And you have German flag. So I thought it is German's letter at that time.

September 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sora_Japan
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I copied 'ō' from your sentences. My keyboard what English and Japanese don't have 'ō'. I guess it is the letter for German.

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I searched about it. It seems I have to input the code like numbers, maybe. There are many Japanese have asked about it on the internet.

September 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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It's not a German letter. There are some Latin-script languages that natively use vowels with macrons (e.g. the Māori language spoken by the indigenous population of New Zealand), but English and German are not among them. More info about macrons: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron_(diacritic)

Macrons are used for long vowels in Hepburn romanization of Japanese: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron_(diacritic)

September 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PricelessCloud

Your comment really helps!!!! Thank you so much its swishy that you explained it so well!

March 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Picmov
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I like your name. Mr\Mrs Sky ? ;)

February 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloArias470876

I like to think of it as 'Honorable' applied to things

July 8, 2017
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