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  5. "手がいたいです。"

"手がいたいです。"

Translation:My hand hurts.

July 5, 2017

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

手が痛いです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelvinBB

ありかとう。You are doing 神さま's work!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dante.I.

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Starkbaer

The plural is often contextual in japanese, couldn't "My hands hurt" also be valid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rie.8

I did that and got a wrong answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jnee12

I also wrote that and got it "wrong"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lerosbif

Of course it does. I've been typing Duolingo answers on my phone all day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PepijnEkel

Is "I hurt my hand" correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro_42

Not literally, since "I hurt my hand" implies that you caused the wound. "手がいたいです" means that your hand hurts, but we know don't know who or what made it hurt. If you made it hurt, then the sentence would be "手をいためました" (you can see more example sentences using いためる here )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben813848

手 here can mean "arm(s)" too, yeah? Just tried, "My arm hurts" and got marked as incorrect. Checked a dictionary and got these two definitions:

The upper limbs of the human body. The part extending from the left and right shoulders of the upper torso. The part from the shoulder joints to the tip of the fingers.

The part [of that] starting at the wrists. Also used not of this entire section, but vaguely of the fingers, palms etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro_42

Technically yeah (according to jisho, but not according to wikitionary), but "手" most often means "hand" ("arm" is usually referred to as "腕"). If you take a look at the example sentences, you'll see that "手" rarely means "arm".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jvitti624

でしょう!大学の授業では、俺の先生はいつも両方の意味と使ったと思いますけど、間違うかもしれませんか?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro_42

Like I said before, the "hand" meaning seems to be more frequent, but the "arm" meaning is also possible. Also, there is a little ambiguity on what the definition of "手" as "hand" is (it may or not include the wrist) . Here are the two main definitions of "手" according to the Japanese dictionary goo:

㋐人体の左右の肩から出ている長い部分。肩から指先までをいう。俗に動物の前肢をいうこともある。「手を高く上げる」「袖に手を通す」「手の長い猿」 (The long part that comes out of both shoulders in the human body. It refers to (what goes) from the shoulder to the fingertips. It's also how animal forelimbs are commonly called. "I raise my arm high" "I put my arms in the sleeves" "A monkey with long arms" )

㋑手首、手首から指先までや、手のひら・指などを漠然とさす。「手に時計をはめる」「火鉢に手をかざす」「手でつまむ」 (It vaguely indicates (parts) such as (the one) from the wrist to the fingertips, or the palm and its fingers. "I put the watch on my 'hand'(wrist)" "I hold out my hands over the brazier" "I pinch/pick up (something) with my hands" )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jvitti624

ご説明ありがとう!Next time I'll report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hugo556225

手たちが痛いです Is "Tachi" needed for hands or isn't it necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amexxxx

No, generally we don't say "手たち".

When we want to emphasize "hands" as both left and right hands but not "hand", we say "両手(りょう て)".

A:どこか痛(いた)いところがありますか?

B:手(て)が痛(いた)いです。

A:どちらの手(て)ですか?

B:両手(りょう て)です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

Not needed and sounds awkward, as if the hands were disembodied and running around in pain..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tuerkenheimer

does the Kanji 手 represent a hand with 6 fingers ? ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡ °)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro_42

Not quite, but you had the right idea. The top stroke is the bent over middle finger, while the horizontal strokes are each two fingers. See the glyph origin here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanVR07

The Sips hand clap test

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