"Sorry, where is the bathroom?"

Translation:Desculpa, onde é o banheiro?

March 6, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ebraga14

The comments in each are teaching me as much as the lessons

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/samosborn88

sorry in this sentence is closer to "excuse me" which is why it wants com licença. but what would i say if i already bumped into you or something, what would i say after the fact. Italian uses scusa for both before and after this situation, and sometimes for i am sorry too. what would you say afterwards in brasil?

June 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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We normally say "desculpa", but you can also hear "me desculpa, desculpe-me, perdão,me perdoe" (pardon me). Then the other person says:"magina" (in my region)

June 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/samosborn88

haha i was confused for a second. (in my region) isnt the translation, youre saying where you live people say "magina" but is the correct word "imagina"?

June 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Yeah, in my region people say "magina". The correct surely is "imagina", but we say just /magina/....ok.. you wont have to imagine anything.... just another different way to say: "no problem" (weird....)

June 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/a.vickers
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Another thought. If I wanted to ask you where you are from, would I use ser as you can't change where you come from? If I then wanted to ask where you are going, would I use estar because your destination could change?

March 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Yep, you got the point. Where are you? - onde você está? - (now, at the present moment)... where are you from? - de onde você é?... where are you going? - onde você está indo? - (now)

March 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyLights

Isn't "quarto de banho" also an acceptable translation for bathroom, at least in Portuguese from Portugal? It marked it wrong for me, but I'm sure I've seen this in a outrigger travel book before.

March 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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Yes, it is perfectly acceptable, it feels more polite (and, I would add, more posh). "Casa de banho" is just more common

March 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/a.vickers
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I thought the word onde always takes the verb estar rather than ser? It certainly does in Spanish.

March 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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No, it doesnt. We surely say onde é when we ask for locations of places, spots. Onde fica is also frequently used. Onde está would be for locations of belongings,example "onde está meu livro?", or for things that "move/ can change place", example "where is the dog?" - "onde está o cachorro?" If its undertood "at the present moment", as quoted in this sentence, use está. The bathroom is supposed to be all the time at the same place, so you use the verb ser, onde é o banheiro. Got it?

March 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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Adding to Paulenrique's answer, if you asked "onde está o banheiro?" it would seem like "where did you put the bathroom?"

December 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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A friend invites you to go to his favorite restaurant, one you've never been to. Before your meal, you ask him where the restrooms are. After listening to his directions, you go to look for it. Your friend notice it takes a long time for you to come back and decide to see where you are. When he finds you and you're angry for not finding the restrooms, you say "onde está o banheiro?"

December 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/KTKee-EnglishEng
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Would you always say bathroom not toilet?

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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In Portuguese, yes, if you say something like "I'm going to the toilet" or "Where is the toilet?" you will always say the word "banheiro" aka bathroom. We only refer to the toilet when talking about the toilet itself, or sitting on the toilet (whose translation in Brazilian Portuguese is "privada" if I'm not mistaken). Saying "privada" instead of "banheiro" when you're asking to go to the toilet is not polite.

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KTKee-EnglishEng
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That would make them like Americans then as they say bathroom, whereas Britons say toilet.

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jdm249

Portuguese is actually more consistent with the permanent vs. temporary distinction between ser/estar than Spanish in this way.

February 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/a.vickers
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Very helpful . Thanks. A

March 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/KTKee-EnglishEng
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Would desculpe and desculpa both be acceptable here? What's the difference between desculpe and desculpa?

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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none, one is conjugated for tu and other for você.

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie.Lkl

Where I live in Brazil I hear people say just 'licença' without the 'com'. So I put 'Licença, onde fica o banheiro?' but it marked it as wrong. Is this an acceptable way to say it?

November 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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I don't think so. "Licença" without "com" is just a colloquial abbreviation. You can say it, but you should never write it. "Com licença" is the correct form.

November 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Quixotic22

"lamento, onde é o banheiro?" ??

October 1, 2015
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