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  5. "ここでとまってはいけません。"

"ここでとまってはいけません。"

Translation:You cannot stop here.

July 6, 2017

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

ここで止まっては行けません


[deactivated user]

    I got an alternative ここで止められません


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan553966

    That's the transitive verb "tomeru" which takes an object.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBanci

    as for stopping here, you cannot.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mzerrath

    It's more like "stopping here is prohibited."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

    It's closer to Chris' version. "Stopping here is prohibited" would be ここで止まるのは禁止(きんし)です


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daniel.z.tg

    It's actually closer to mzerrath's version.

    "You cannot stop here" (Chris' version) would be ここで止まれません

    ここで - here

    止ま - to stop

    れ - potential

    ません - polite negative

    ここで止まってはいけません means "You may/must not stop here"

    ここで - here

    止まって - to stop

    はいけ - permission

    ません - polite negative


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patdj

    how do I know that it s 2nd person?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candy580365

    Probably because it's not something you would be saying to yourself?


    [deactivated user]

      I think this question is valid. While it may be strange to say it to yourself, I've heard people use it in that context before. I think it can be seen from multiple viewpoints.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

      It would be strange to say it to yourself. It wouldn't be strange to say it about yourself.

      Your friend says "stop here," you reply "I can't stop here."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

      Technically it doesn't have to be, since it's like "One cannot (may not) stop here", but 2nd person would be the most common use/translation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderL2

      Eh, the Japanese sentence here doesn't use any personal pronouns so really, it's not second person at all. Duo sometimes chooses a colloquial English phrase that could be used in a similar situation instead of a literal translation. This is one of those times.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tai40777

      The て form of verbs (not ている) is regularly used as a command when they're the sole verb of a sentence, so this is probably why the 2nd person is implied here.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndresDePedro

      I failed because i was very distracted by the spanish translation of the first part "coco de tomate..." sounds delicious! :-D


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaszloXali

      "This is bat country."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJC0Wl

      コウモリの地域です。


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TBreezy905

      So this can't be "I can't stop here"? How would you say that then?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arcferrari248

      「ここで止まれません。」


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonathan.r387797

      ここはコウモリのくにです


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cosmefulanito3

      "You can't go tomato here"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo358607

      coconut of tomato don't stop


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tai40777

      When I learned __ていけません, I was taught that it was "must not," rather than "cannot." In English, these two words do kinda have different intensities.

      Is it wrong here or is DL just too stingy?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antimodes

      "Must not" is correct for this Japanese phrase. Using "cannot" to mean "must not" in English is a colloquialism (ie: everyone does it, but it is technically incorrect grammar). Duolingo is wrong if it doesn't accept "must not" here.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-tasty-treat

      Would "You may not stop here" be translated differently?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johana659482

      Duo marked, "You must not stop here" wrong. Is there a difference between 'can not' and 'must not'.?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mommarigo

      It's my brain mixing Spanish and English, but for the love of Duo, I keep hearing it as Coconuts and Tomatoes.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chrabia297

      Istn't "ike" "to go"? I don't understand this sentence


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T33K3SS3LCH3N

      行きます (ikimasu) means "[someone] goes".

      いけません (ikemasen) with a verb in te-form means something along the lines of "is not allowed".

      Itte ikemasen - You cannot go.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan553966

      "Ikemasu" is potential (can go)

      "Ikemasen" is negative, potential, polite (cannot go).

      "....te wa ikemasen" (As for ...., it cannot go) is idiomatic for "cannot ....."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kagabati

      So it's similar to how 行 is used in Mandarin. I had a suspicion, thank you for confirming. (:


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/corazon_piedra

      Why not "you cannot wait here?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tai40777

      The verb in use is とまる, not まつ.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eyhko

      What would it be if it was an affirmative sentence? "ここでとまってをください"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T33K3SS3LCH3N

      Just without the を I think.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tai40777

      This would have the opposite meaning.

      とまってください Please stop. とまってはいけません You cannot (must not) stop.

      In the first one, the speaker wants the other person to stop and in the second one, the speaker does not want the other person to stop.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wolverine_1

      Doesn't tomatte mean stay and tomete mean stop? If so, then the answer should be - You can't stay here.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

      That depends on the kanji you would choose to write it with. Both verbs have an intransitive and transitive version with those pronunciations:

      止まる [intr.] = to stop / cease

      泊まる [intr.] = to stay (at / with)

      止める [tr.] = to stop / turn off

      泊める [tr.] = to accomodate / put up


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laurie68898

      There is no subject, so "I" is just as valid as "you"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hirimbo

      ここで止まっては行けません。 これはコウモリの国です。


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christi207184

      I feel like one of those teachers that's like "I dunno, CAN you" - so I always translate these things as "may". Is that really incorrect for this?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan553966

      Could it not mean "stay" as well?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmcliesh1

      why is "do not stop here" wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo358607

      You can (not) stop here

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