https://www.duolingo.com/odoinn

How does learning Irish make you feel?

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We go through a range of emotions learning a language unfortunately there has been little research done in this area. This is true for all language not just Irish.

In order to answer this question, a fellow researcher of mine is conducting a survey among Irish language learners to investigate the range of emotions learners experience when they are learning the Irish language. This survey takes 2 minutes to complete and your participation would be really appreciated. The results of this study will inform the design of Irish language courses going forward.

The study has received ethics approval from the DCU Ethics Committee and all data received will be protected.

Click here to access the survey: https://goo.gl/forms/ToIW2KZEgq89FNir1

On clicking the link, you will be presented with a more detailed description of the study as well as a consent form which you will need to complete before filling out the survey.

Thanking you in advance for your interest and participation in this research.

1 year ago

157 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sphecida

I'm of Scottish descent and learned some Scottish Gaelic years ago. Learning Irish is both familiar and confusing! It takes me a little while to recognize the Irish versions of the words. I'm so glad that Duolingo offers Irish, but I wish they had Scottish Gaelic as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan732254

Where did you learn Scots Gaelic? I aspire to learn all the Celtic languages. I am slowly working on Irish (as I am an Irish native and studied it in school) and I will be doing Welsh in the near future but do you have any recommended books/sites for Scots Gaelic (and Manx if possible too)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sphecida

I learned Scottish Gaelic from Tris King, whom I met at a Scottish Games in California. We used a book called Bun-Chursa Gaidhlig by Bill Blacklaw. I was fortunate to visit Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, the Gaelic college in Skye on a family trip. My dream is to go there for a full course. Their website has a lot of resources. I also have a dictionary by Malcolm Maclennan that I sometimes read for fun, because it's full of words that give insight into Gaelic culture.

Good luck with learning all the Celtic languages! I took a look at Welsh and decided I needed more than a book and a cassette tape. Tris used to joke that the Scots and the Welsh had a fight over words. The Scots came out of the fracas with all the vowels, and the Welsh ended up with all the consonants. :D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan732254

That's funny. I tip my cap to you good sir. Thanks for the tips and recommendations and Tá suile agam go mbeidh tú go hiontach a dhéanamh, maidir le do léinn.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaiTwp
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For Manx you could try https://www.saysomethingin.com/manx it's an excellent audio course (There's also a similar course for Welsh but not Irish or Scots Gaelic yet unfortunately)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizabethS746001
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Transparent has Scottish Gaelic on their Byki site. the most simple of their language learning. More just learning vocabulary than structure, for the most part.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cathal36986

cád é mar a tá tú inniu?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrishSelkie
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yovan.24

Manx is extinct :(((

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RabbitsRabbits

https://www.memrise.com/courses/english/scottish-gaelic/ Just in case you haven't seen this.

The nice thing is you can make your own course, or help other people with other community courses.

Once you have been on memrise for a while and clearly know the ropes the moderators will let you be a curator of a course. For example, if you are studying using the Routlage Colloquial book you could ask to be allowed to add to that course

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KimberlyS2

Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yovan.24

Alba will be indepent soon. Lol I have just watched the Outlaw King (about Robert the Bruce). I'm Serbian (ex Yugoslavia, Balkan peninsula) and I really like Celtic symbols, culture,languages ecc. My geographical dreams are recover of Yugoslavia, independent Scotland, independent Wales, bigger autonomy for Cornwall and Brittany, reviving of Manx, and finally Ulster not divided (which means N. Ireland annexed by Republic of Ireland).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

hi! i love Irish and Ireland and am trying to learn there beautiful language! i’m actually an aspiring writer and one of my books is based there!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheDoctor263480

That is so cool!! what is the name of the book? it would b cool to read a book in Irish!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

sorry i’m so late to reply to you i lost the password to this account and i just recently found it

i haven’t really come up with a name yet i like to do that at the end idk why :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

fluttershy937702 stop lying to yourself

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

excuse me! what are you trying to say?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mindy786745

he's a troll.. ignore him

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

you talk to much

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chromalogue
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I find that the lack of slowed-down audio on the dictation questions has been a major stumbling block for me. I've tried to power through it, but what I'm doing feels like cheating, not learning. Not being able to pick out the sounds means I'm just guessing as to the spelling, and not being able to work out the spelling means that I'm guessing about the grammatical rules, too. All in all, I've found it very dispiriting.

The good news is, it seems to make every other language ridiculously easy by comparison. German was hard for me at first, but after Irish it's a breeze. Welsh? Difficult, but with the slowed-down audio I'm getting the sounds, and that means I'm slowly getting the rules too. Everywhere tells me Icelandic is wildly hard, but I can understand more Icelandic after one month than I've been able to understand of Irish in a year and change.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reynir4536

I agree that some of the sentences are spoken fast and are rather hard to understand, so that it is tough work to "beat the clock".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheBodhranGuy

I find that writing every vocab word I get has helped with that greatly, especially at the beginning. I have a stack of papers with words written out along with my own translations of how they're pronounced (how my ear hears it anyhoo) , and as I practice, I look back at words I thought I heard. After a while, I'm able to better recognize the words as the speaker says them, and I don't have to look for them anymore.

Write out the words (many times) and say them out loud or in your head as you do. It helps them stick, for me at least.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessMacW

I do that too. I have to learn things with my fingers and my mouth or I'm hopeless.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

you could keep going with irish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chromalogue
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I haven't stopped, or anything. I just do a couple of modules a day and despair of ever being even minimally functional in it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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For most people, minimal functionality will require interacting with other people in the language, whether face to face or online. Even other learners, if it encourages you to loosen up and actually engage in a back and forth conversation.

Very few people can develop any real facility with the language as lone learners.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmlfanning
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It makes me feel patriotic. Under British rule, the Irish were outlawed from speaking this language, and that includes my family. Now, I have the ability to learn Irish and speak it thanks to Duolingo. It's a really wonderful feeling! Thank you, Duo! :D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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Did this "law" have a name, or a number?

There was never a law that "outlawed" the Irish from speaking Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imi_imp
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they were a bit oppressed for a while, right? the brits didn't let them teach or speak it in schools, nobody could stop them from doing it at home but it was shameful and made you 'look stupid' they thought

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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The National School system was originally designed to be a secular system, without religious segregation. But that changed because the Irish people didn't find it acceptable. So this idea that "the brits" just imposed whatever they felt like on an oppressed Irish populace is wilful ignorance on the part of modern readers who are too lazy to appreciate that those oppressed Irish speakers had minds of their own, and were very willing to stand up for what they thought was important.

The Irish wasn't part of the National School curriculum, and there was no demand that it should be added, because learning English was considered a valuable skill - exactly the sort of thing you send children to school to learn. These Irish speakers didn't consider Irish "shameful and made you 'look stupid'", it just wasn't considered a requirement that it be taught in school. If there was shame, it was about not being able to speak good English - but nobody was ashamed of bi-lingualism, they just didn't consider it useful once enough people could speak English.

This still happens today - you can hear conversations in English between native speakers in the Gaeltacht, and there are still Gaeltacht families who insist on their children speaking English in the home, while in the Galltacht, people are hammering on the doors of Gaelscoileanna trying to they their kids enrolled. (In both of those cases, both the Gaeltacht and the Galltacht children will end up leading essentially monoglot English speaking adult lives in most cases, unless they make an explicit choice to maintain their Irish, either by seeking out a job that requires Irish, or actively pursuing social opportunities that will allow them to use Irish).

Modern value judgements about whether this was a good or bad idea are irrelevant. The people of the time made their own value judgments, and they were far better placed to make those judgments than most of the people reading these comments. It's patronizing to assume that they made a bad decision because you don't agree with it, and that someone else must have been to blame for that bad decision, because you won't accept that they made a decision that you don't agree with.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FeasterFamine

It seems like you are saying that the majority of Irish folk, a population with an unusually strong oral tradition, made a conscious and purposeful decision to give up their own language in trade for English all on their own.

This during a period where a foreign government had established a system that refused to teach or even allow the language to be spoken, and in less than three generations Irish went from being the primary language to rarely spoken in all counties but those most distant from the UK. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Irish_language#/media/File%3AIrishin1871.jpg

I recently read in the Irish Times of a fellow in Cork that quit his job because his boss insisted that he not ever speak Irish in the workplace. https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/irish-speaking-barman-leaves-job-after-being-told-not-to-speak-irish-1.2785633 Other stories crop up about how Irish is at least occasionally frowned upon or somehow considered elitist or foppish, but not so when speaking English. http://www.thejournal.ie/readme/conradh-na-gaeilge-negative-reaction-speaking-irish-2975889-Sep2016/

I dont know man, it sounds to me like there is more to this than a whole country suddenly deciding a foreign language makes more sense to speak than their own.

Here’s an interesting link describing in some detail how the language declined (Essentially the English, the famine, and emigration) and seems to be speaking about exactly this thread conversation... https://whistlinginthewind.org/2015/08/20/why-dont-the-irish-speak-irish/

And a couple of links about the Irish oral tradition: http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20160502-how-the-irish-lost-their-words

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seancha%C3%AD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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You have a very simplistic view of the matter. (You're hardly alone in that).

On the one hand, you credit the Irish people with "an unusually strong oral tradition", but you think that, after speaking Irish for centuries, without any formal educational system, that 6 years of National School was enough to make a person forget how to speak Irish? The products of that National School system were still Irish speakers, but many of them choose not to use Irish if they didn't have to. There were social pressures that encouraged speaking English, but there was no legal compunction, and the social pressures came from other Irish people, they weren't imposed by "a foreign government".

You say that "a foreign government" didn't "even allow the language to be spoken" but that simply isn't true - it was never illegal for Irish people to speak Irish, and even the infamous "tally-sticks" in the national schools were there because the parents who sent their children to those schools wanted their children to learn English.

"The English" didn't suppress Irish - "the English" couldn't give a tuppenny damn about Irish, and simply ignored it, and refused to recognize it's existence. On the other hand, "the English" actively suppressed the religion that most of the native Irish professed, yet that suppression was singularly ineffective. The National Schools were supposed to be non-denominational, but that changed because of pressure from the communities, who refused to comply with the system as originally designed. There was no such push back on the issue of the language of instruction - the schools didn't need to teach Irish, because the pupils already knew Irish, and when that generation choose to only speak English to their children, it wasn't because they couldn't speak Irish to them, or weren't allowed to.

People who speak Irish to their parents and English to the children are not the victims of some hateful foreign campaign of language suppression. They considered themselves forward-thinking and progressive, equipping the children for a future in the modern world.

You might want to compare the experience of the Irish language in the US, compared to German, Italian, Spanish and Polish. There is still a weekly German language newspaper published in Chicago, and you can still hear Italian spoken in any Italian-American gathering, yet the Irish language has never been a mainstream part of Irish-American culture, because the generation or two that lived through the transition from Irish to English did not consider themselves impoverished by losing the Irish language.

I'm not saying that that was a good thing, or that, sitting here in the 21st century, I agree with the decisions that were made in the 19th century. I'm simply saying that you are trying to impose your 21st century values on these people, and you are yourself indulging in a form of cultural imperialism, by refusing to acknowledge that these previous generations made active decisions for themselves and their children, and that they weren't helpless pawns in this process. There are still native Irish speakers today who are raising their children through English, on purpose, and just as you have to respect their right to do that, even if you disagree with them, you need to respect the decisions made by people 150 years ago in this regard.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timoth.gher
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Some Research is needed. (( Read up on what happened in the 1920's in particular - how December 1924 had a University of Professors, correct and update the MODERN NUMBERING SYSTEM so as a language - we could use Math to Trade and do Business with others.)) This is a big issue in itself... and you'll come to appreciate why.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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???? Did you run that paragraph through Google translate before you posted it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia_Ir

Funny, I understand it fine and English isn't even my first language.

Of course, I'm a distrustful person; when someone makes critical but unspecific remarks about grammar or spelling instead of replying to the statement, I usually think it's just a smoke screen for "I have no good answer to that".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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I'm glad you were able to understand it, Julia. Maybe you can explain to the rest of us what the "University of Professors" did in 1924?

I wasn't remarking on the grammar or spelling of the previous comment, but on it's logic and credibility.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DithBhatag

I am an Irish man born and raised from the North Eat of the Country, Drogheda. I have to say duolingo is absolutely amazing. I have learned more on this site that I had at school. Great to see it and I hope it continues for years to come. Keep up the GREAT work duolingo!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

I don't really enjoy Irish that much but you on the other hand like it so I can't really say much about that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GresoTheGropaga

Short answer: "there are two kinds of people in the world, those who are Irish and those who want to be Irish" XD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

lol i love being part Irish

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yak_spammm

H

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia_Ir

That leaves out the third kind: "I'm Irish on my great-grandmothers' side, because her husband/father/brother-in-law was from Dublin, and I drink green beer every St Patrick's day". ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Go1rish
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I have this vision in my head of sitting in a nice, cozy restaurant in Ireland sharing stories with locals in Irish. (hopefully, older folks - to hear their history and stories from the past (but I like talking to older people here in the States, too.)) That thought keeps me going. I think that would be great. I would feel totally immersed in the culture. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allverdizade

This is fully possible in Galway, for instance. Saw it with my own eyes a few days ago!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steven306704

I was once in a pub in rural Galway and the toilets were covered In graffiti ' as gaeilge '

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizabethS746001
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this is pretty much my dream also. I finished the course, but I keep it fresh every day. Irish is feeling more and more like a regular language to me, instead of a learning language. If that makes sense.

Duo has been perfect for learning Irish. From Duo I am jumping to videos done in Irish language and music and TV shows. Understanding clearer and more every day. Reading is the best, since it makes the most sense to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shunk4

u gay haha

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TLoftus

Picked this up on a whim while tracing my family lineage. Contacted a cousin in Dingle and thought it would be nice be able to say hello one day.
Not easy for an old boy like me but fun nevertheless. Maybe something like a childs book in irish would be great. "See Jackie run. Run Jackie run. Don't drop the Guiness."

Go raibh maith agat agus slán

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaClery
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There are lots of children's school books in Irish , they start at the very beginning . You can also buy posters , all can be found online . I think Folens is the school book site . There is also a little red book of verbs that could be useful

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaikyFarsk
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Even though my culture has nothing to do with the Irish's, I love learning it because it makes me feel Unique!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Durellion
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Learning Irish and Welsh on DuoLingo has made me feel hopeful. I'd really love to see the other Celtic languages (Scottish Gaelic, Manx, Cornish, and Breton) on the site.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nogaash
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I only see the welsh course, where is the Irish course?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_McG
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Well done on such a positive comment. Have a lingot!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Official-EU

I thought Irish would be similar to English. I was wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia_Ir

Oh dear. That expectation has somewhat better chances to turn out true than "I thought Japanese would be similar to English" and somewhat worse chances than, say, "I thought the US would be like in a Hollywood blockbuster movie". Okay, you're already learning German, that is similar to English. Only with lots more grammar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smacclutch

haha! No language could be more different!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuckiestPixel

I'm learning it because I have a bit of the heritage, I love the culture, and I just want to keep this beautiful language alive. One day when I'm proficient in it, I might try and teach it to other people.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackMcslay
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I am glad duolingo offers a language that's been in decline, hope it helps preserving a bit of european culture

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ptrk83
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I started to learn it just to see what it sounds like and understand the basic linguistics of the language. The little nagging voice in my head kept on saying (don't do it!) because it wouldn't be practical to learn it other than just to learn it. Wouldn't mind getting closer to my heritage by learning it but I'd rather just focus on languages that I plan on using.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

so i agree with Go1irsh i would love to visit there and “try” to talk with some people and since i am only at level two i have a long why to go!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Go1rish
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just keep at it. a few minutes a day. and make videos of yourself trying to speak it, too. I find that that helps a little.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizabethS746001
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Yeah, I use the iphone recording to record my answers and play them back, erase, play and erase (several times) until it sounds like the speaker in the app.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

Thanks so much! I’m part Irish and love the country.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

I wasn't talking fluttershy937702 to you when I said your a good person go Irish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

Go raibh maith agat!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

your a good person goirish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

what are you saying your on level 6

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

I was on level 2 when I posted this

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

fluttershy937702

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johnjoe80146

I'm using Duo Lingo every day because I want to improve my ability to read/write and speak Irish, not just now and then, but to have it as a regular part of my communication options. I'm very glad I downloaded the app to my phone and tablet. Do please keep the improvements and maybe new features??? coming. Many thanks for your hard work and perseverance.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bernadine933054

i feel more connected with this beautiful country :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatieCople

Learning this language makes me feel more alive inside and much more connected to my ancestors. Going back through the family tree, 6 of 9 last names, from both sides, originated in Ireland or Scottland.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin_Tracy

It makes me feel close to my grandma. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdp1974
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Learning Irish is certainly a challenge as a native English speaker, I find the Scandinavian languages much easier to pick up in terms of spelling and pronunciation. I do feel strongly that all the native languages of Britain and Ireland should thrive and reverse the declines experienced in the 20th and this century, and Duolingo is, I hope, playing its part in this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maragatu
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Irish orthography is madness. I love it. I find myself laughing at the fact that I am able to pronounce some words that look as if a cat walked on the keyboard.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_McG
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I used to think that too! But give it time because it is actually very fair: what you see is really what you say, you just have to see it 'as Gaeilge' and not as you were trained to by other languages. (Just for comparison, think of '*ough' in English as in: cough, rough, through, thorough, plough, slough, ought, bought, bough, dough... can't be all that easy for an English-learner!)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xXCiaraXx
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This is a language that I really want to learn but it is also a lot harder than learning other languages. The grammar of germanic and latinian languages is way more familiar to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onceuponaflower

I love learning languages, and Irish is refreshing because it's so different from anything else I'm learning. I'm trying to delve deeper into the language and would love to live in Ireland one day, or at least visit areas that speak Irish in the countryside. I'd also like to learn more about Irish culture and folklore, and I feel like understanding the language will help me in that aspect.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cathal36986

go n-éirigh leat a chara

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

hello!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adri293338
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I'd love if you can share the research results in the end! It's very interesting and unusual.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dennis324822
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I have to say that Irish is quite a heavy project to begin. Right now my focus is Swedish and with knowledge of Dutch, English, French, German and some Spanish you can even rush through some new lessons which is obviously not the case in Irish :D Any knowledge I have turns out utterly useless for that project.. I'm happy to start it another time next year because that langauge is a tough cookie =)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glynnes1
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This is kind of where I'm at. I am focused on Spanish, German and Italian right now and thought I would try Irish because that is a big part of my heritage and I am going there in a month and a half. It is much more to tangle with than I anticipated. I still toy with it every now and then, but I think it is going to have to wait until I am more secure in the other three languages so I can give it the attention it really deserves.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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As a visitor to Ireland, the two most important words of Irish to know about are Fir and Mná, because even though English is the first language for the vast majority of people in Ireland, it's not unusual to find signs and labels in Irish, and if you want to use the bathroom/washroom/restroom/toilet, and assume that the F in Fir has something to do with "female", or that Mná must mean "Men", you might embarrass yourself!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuisQ397354
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I found Irish absolutely fantastic to learn, it is a little difficult to understand at the beginning but then I found that the learning curve is more or less easier than other languages... I love it!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanHakam

Took the survey and had the GF take it as well. We're both grad students so we know how challenging it can be to get people to do surveys and get the sample size you're looking for.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annievlord

I started learning Irish as a challenge. It certainly is that! I keep trying but haven't moved on very far as I keep needing to go over the basics again and again. When someone did speak to me in Irish recently I knew what they were saying but could not formulate an answer. Perhaps that's something that will come. I have found Greek easier!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RabbitsRabbits

Your question should read "how long have you been learning Irish online" or you will get distorted results caused by people learning it in a school environment.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nora313001

Wow! This research topic really interests because everyone feels differently and has a different worldview depending on the language they speak, according to the research I have done.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tiger909

I am an Irish man born and raised from the North Eat of the Country, Drogheda. I have to say duolingo is absolutely amazing. I have learned more on this site that I had at school. Great to see it and I hope it continues for years to come. Keep up the GREAT work duolingo!!!

Hahahaha

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylarrumble1

it makes me feel good about my self

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim969579

shy

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LibertyLindsey03

really confused! my roots are Irish, Scottish, and German... and learning irish is absolutely, and totally, confusing!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

I am german jew scott irish wow were like the same!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LibertyLindsey03

Haha! yea! i guess we are;) i dont have Jewish in me, though... not that i know of:0

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin_Tracy

I do, however, wish on the mobile version, there was more Irish narrative like when learning French. I have trouble with some words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GuardianSoul

I've always wanted to learn Irish and I like it a lot. It makes me feel happy. It feels like I'm a part of it! Keep going Doulingo and keep going Odoinn!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LavaPerson

I am Irish on my dad's side, but never knew Irish, so that's why I'm learning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leimcon
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I am enjoying learning irish but find all the vowels and accents clustered in words difficult to remember and it is not easy as a beginner to get a grasp of regular patterns to help the learning stick

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarylMarkey

IT makes me feel great

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pukenjam
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Best language in the world to learn, gan amhras, pity that it isn't thought in a more youthful way, outside of mainstream schooling is the only way to learn the language. But it is the best regardless.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bredacm

Why is this section still on here if you are not accepting responses?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HiroMahtava
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I am not an Irish , i dont even have any Irish ancestors. I simply loved the language ( i have never been to Ireland before) I wanna keep the language alive , the best way to do it is to learn it myself , it's challenging as always cuz it's not even related to my native language, it will get better if more and more people use it and speak it everyday , i kinda wish someone can talk to me and practice with me , cuz i still cant say a full sentence for now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanieRoss

The survey is no longer available. What happened? What were the results? I hope to go to Ireland this year so would like to greet people and order a pint. I'll look for a speaker with whom to converse.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoYOUknoeDEwei

im stuck on this

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HAILI421868

i love learning Irish because i mean who wouldn't if there Irish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krysteena10

Aww, survey is closed! Maybe edit the title or post and let people know that? I was kind of excited to share my experience trying to learn this language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sponge808

Dia Duit!!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Straffan

I feel warm and fuzzy inside! I live in Australia now and as I'm getting older I find myself wanting to connect more strongly to my roots. As a child I spent thirteen years learning Irish in school but i have a better understanding of it now after only a couple of months on Duolingo. I'd love it if my children showed an interest in learning Irish!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kate966446

It's tough, I'm not very far, but it's also lots of fun!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
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I love learning Irish but not here on Duolingo. I come back from time to time but I find that they give the most difficult sentences they can find. Always the ones that are exceptions to the normal grammar rules. I find it totally frustrating here...however, I have been doing the Future Learn courses and make all the vocabulary into quizlets and I have learned a great deal from them. I feel like I am moving ahead with my learning from Future Learn, not constantly getting confused like I do here. I came back today to see if I could use Duolingo to reinforce what I am learning at Future Learn but it was just frustrating again.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spencer269188

I'm learning Irish it is confusing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan732254

Well no language is easy, especially a language from a different European family tree to the Germanic, Romantic and Slavic trees. But there are knacks to it and I would recommend visiting West Ireland (or the Gaeltacht in Newfoundland) and speaking it, along with some (YouTube) classes as well as Duolingo. AND ALWAYS ASK QUESTIONS!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maduganme
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I'm ashamed to say I had to give it up, I found it too hard. Plus the fact I'm not likely to use it. I wanted to try something different from the European languages and thought I would give Irish a try. I may go back to it in the future.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LemonComputer0

I am learning this because of an interest in the family history. This may just be because I have tried Greek and Russian (before stopping them), but I'm finding it kinda easy so far.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timoth.gher
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Only my Fathers' Surname of Gallagher...made me curious about any interest in foreign travel. (( As a citizen of The U.S., there's been a lot of Hatred in general.)) For Instance... Entitlement Issues with Relatives that expect fantasy and financial well being without putting in their own blood, sweat and tears into The Household.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnysunday
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uhh.. warm and fuzzy?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeeganRyan3

I just started Irish and I'm already super confused because they've seemed to forget some of the alphabet, but in my experience learning my first second language (if that makes sense), I was super hyped then just annoyed now I'm passionate about learning it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WatkinsonPat

I find myself confused by the sounds of the letters and diaphones. They don't seem to be the same in all places in the words. I understand "s" before "a" or "e" sounding like "sh" because I am familiar with names. Do others have the same problem or is it my hearing?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smacclutch

Listening is everything! check out www.tg4.ie - the rest will come!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sIzIY
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I think Duo Lingo is great but I would also love if there were a Michel Thomas style Irish course. Does anyone know of such course?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littlebird10

I have some Irish In my blood so I think it is great that I get to learn the language of my ancestors! Though it can be difficult to get the accent just right!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janMaten
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Taim maith.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nwwsl
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It makes me feel like someone should consider revising Irish orthography...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MateuszWil16

Haha, they already simplified it back in the thirties. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beefschuhe
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I am a staunch anarchist, so I definitely can't say that patriotism brought me to the language. Almost all of my family is from Ireland with the most recent immigrants being from the 1960s, I like the culture and lore of the island given that I grew up with it, but that being said, I am only learning the language for fun. I like the sound and look of it, nothing more, and I hate how the language has become such a politicised issue by nationalists.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sIzIY
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The gaelscoileanna have come about through people and not the government. There are children from non Irish backgrounds learning Irish....if anything the state has totally messed up the Irish language's status

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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In all fairness, the "politicization" of the language issue in Northern Ireland can more fairly be blamed on Unionists. There have been various degrees of cross community support for Irish language initiatives over the years, and the current political stalemate in NI surrounding this issue boils down to "we oppose it because they support it" - classic zero-sum 20th century Unionism, in a nutshell.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephDonn9

I like learning Irish - I learn it in school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medievalmaide715

I haven't started it quite yet, so I can't really say XD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stellanfarrell

Irish. Is. fast.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/munchygaro

❤❤❤❤!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiofraMcGeoghan

No.1 I don't like Irish No.2 I'm forced in school No.3 My name is Irish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shannon_Clarke_

I'm from Northern Ireland. I always hated Irish in school and much preferred to learn French. I find that French is a lot like English while Irish sounds like gibberish to me. However, I am trying to learn it slowly but surely on Duolingo to make myself seem more Irish haha

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HoshaCrume

Since Irish is the only language I have gotten into studding so far, its really confusing and complicated for me. I cant remember half the stuff Ive already "learned" besides 'An or na'.(The) Idk, its hard cuz I have trouble remembering new things anyways and I'm in the middle of practicing and learning my guitar and many other things as it is!(I have major ADD and that has affected my learning ALOT!!)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Confused, mostly. I'm scottish by heritage but Scottish Gaelic ain't available here so second-best option :D

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chevko

I've been mildly confused by it myself because it seems like the dialect being used changes between some phrases and there's just not enough voice examples showing you how things should be pronounced.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordan179848

Why isn't it letting me do the survey?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
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The researcher who conducted the survey has presumably received enough responses to complete their research, and submit their report.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FirstConan
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I wanted to learn Celtic Languages and I wanted to be speaker of it.... Just hoping this language will not vanish into the oblivion... (Despite of the fact that only 1 learners will not help preventing it from dying... but my interset, sometimes goes out of my control) That's Why

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cactus5764

I am of Irish decent, and It makes me feel accomplished!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeganPantr1

la

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adam75569

makes me feel gay

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvaBhowmik

Irish? Bleh.. I'm still sour about it. It is HORRIBLE you've got to believe me! The agony, the pain, the nausea. HORRIBLE LISTEN TO ME

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cathal36986

Rubbish - Irish is a thing of beauty, predating English and forms the basis of a lot of words and phrasing that is used in English today.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spencer269188

Hi

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan732254

Yo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

I am from Nigeria and I don't really like Irish because its so boring

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LibertyLindsey03

aww! I can see how you would think that^... but, if you actually talk with an irish person, they are very animated and funny!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingbatch12

your a really nice person unlike fluttershy937702

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LibertyLindsey03

thanks...i try to be nice<3

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LibertyLindsey03

i think that fluttershy937702 is just trying to get his point across... but his point might have seemed meaner than it was intended to be:(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

what point? just asking :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunsetsasha

I actually love these comments, like the whole argument deal between kingbatch12 and Fluttershy, and then liberde just like stuck in the middle. So classy, I love comment section arguments, sign me up

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluttershy937702

XD ya "classy"

6 months ago
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