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"Credo che i miei compagni di classe abbiano la stessa domanda."

Translation:I believe my classmates have the same question.

March 25, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aanaaaa

are -"lavorare" - lavori, lavori, lavori, lavoriamo, lavoriate, lavorino
ere- "vendere" - venda, venda, venda, vendiamo, vendiate, vendano
ire - "dormire" - dorma, dorma, dorma, dormiamo, dormiate, dormano
just some terminations in subjunctive present


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iluaehrvf

I kinda translated compagni to comrades as a joke but I really wish it would've been accepted if not for accuracy then just for laughs... Plus it was suggested.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanni666

"I believe that my class mates have the same question" was rejected by DL. Spot the difference and tell me why anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

Your use of "class mates" instead of "classmates" is the likely problem. Expressions like classmate, shipmate, flatmate etc are one word. You occasionally see them as two words but I think that is really a mistake, and so it has not been included as a correct answer by Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tini582581

Classmates is one word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlfZimmer

'that my classmates ...' is correct English. Duolingo's skipping the 'that' or not is haphazard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryBallan

Is same request wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

I notice that the exercise uses the word "abbiano". However, in the tips and notes and in Barron's 501 Italian Verbs (4th edition) it is "abbiamo". Is this a typo or is there some additional rule here of which i am unaware.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanni666

Certainly it would not be "abbiamo" as this is present indicative for "we are" and the sentence would not be correct obviously. It could be "hanno" for present indicative of "they are" and I believe this would be correct and that the sentence would make sense. "Abbiano" though expresses the subjunctive mood as in '"they may have" the same question' in which an uncertainty is being expressed and this probably works best in terms of what the sentence is meaning to convey. There is a great explanation of the subjunctive at this link provided by adamyoung97 - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/8783716/Italian-Subjunctive-Guide


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

Thanks. Now I see that one has m and the other has n. I guess I need new glasses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derek199688

I translated "credo" as "I belive", clearly a typo, but Duo tells me i used the wrong word, yet when i make an outrageous spelling mistake Duo tells me i have a typo and passes my answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dusics95

is class comrade a word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sal716426

This is not an expression normally used in English. Classmates is the conventional word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueWaller

I believe "request" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sal716426

A question is not quite the same as a request. A question would most likely be an enquiry, whereas a request is an attempt to get something from someone. E.g. In class a question might be "What is the capital city of England?" compared with a request "May I leave the room, please?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PattyDiLaura

Why isn't the answer" I believe THAT my classmates have the same question"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne409117

Classmates is US English, not English English. Why dont you accept ‘class companions’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sal716426

"Companions simply would not be used by a native English speaker (except, perhaps, ironically). "Classmates" is normal and as an English native I would expect to (and did) translate the Italian thus. "That" is technically correct and I try to use it wherever it introduces a subordinate clause but it can sound a little too correct and unnatural and is often omitted; after "I think" and "I believe" for example.

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