https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

I'm having trouble with learning two languages

I'm Italian and its my dream to learn how to speak Italian but I'm also taking French class and I already took a year of Spanish too. I always seem to mix up the languages. Am I the only one who seems to do this? I also am great when it comes to learning it and speaking it but then when I test myself on it I ALWAYS fail. out of a year of French class I only got one A+ , two B's and the rest were either C's, D's, or F's.

1 year ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jenshero
jenshero
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I was learning bits of Italian while I was studying French and then Spanish at school as well!

My best advice would be to focus on one language at a time.

What I did was I left Italian until after my exams so that I wouldn't be learning more than 2 languages. Then I made sure never to study French and Spanish in the same day so that I didn't mix them up, and bizarrely I could switch quite fast from one language to the other. I'm guessing it was just practice..

That's my experience and I'm not sure what else to advise really, sorry :( We will see what other people say.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

that is actually really helpful! Thank you so much :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenshero
jenshero
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you're welcome! i'm glad :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarryPotterJedi

I mix them up too, the best way for me, is to do maybe one lesson a day for each one, but then go back and redo and strengthen old lessons.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

That's a smart idea. Thank you for the advice

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/therandomfandoms

Maybe make flashcards that have a word on them in a language, and on the back is the language that it is. For example, the front of one might say "bois," and on the back it would say "French." I'm just throwing ideas out there... For extra style points, on the back where it says what language it's in, put what the word is in your main language. Example: the front might say "bois," and on the back it says "French" and underneath it, it says "drink."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

but I really appreciate the advice and I will give it a try. Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/therandomfandoms

np

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

thats a good idea but I always loose them and I don't have a phone so I cant use an app either

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferPa930371

Hi, My first language is Spanish and I am trying to learn French and Italian. However, I see that some words are very alike. I sometimes mix them up. Since the languages we are trying to learn are so similar, I would say learning one at a time would be best. I would say French is the easiest, but that is just my opinion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

I totally agree! French is really easy and I taken Spanish before but I don't remember much. I took a year of Spanish in middle school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferPa930371

Yeah, most people say that Spanish is a hard language to learn. I wouldn't know since its my first language. haha But I can say that knowing just a little Spanish will help you learn Italian better. I am finding very easy to understand and pronounce certain words because of my Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

honestly Spanish is easy to learn I just never did my work in class which I really regret doing. Spanish helps me with French also and I'm glad to know that it also helps with Italian too

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sphinx1824
Sphinx1824
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It's natural to make mistakes, but for the sake of your grades you may want to focus exclusively on French before class in the morning and all the time as tests approach. One thing I've found useful in not mixing up languages as I study them is to "stagger the levels", so to speak. What I mean is that I started with Spanish and didn't start German until my Spanish was at a high enough level to be distinct, for me. I then started French when my German was at a similar level. That way, I was learning basic points of one language's grammar at different times than I was learning them for another language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/therandomfandoms

Also, learning Spanish helps you understand Italian, too, or so I have heard. So, if it's true, then I suggest teach yourself a little more Spanish...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyanaBob

Spanish actually really helped me with French surprisingly and a lot of people have said its hard to learn but it really easy especially if you know some Spanish too

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

Like everybody else is saying take one at a time. Begin the one that's most important to you first and master it thoroughly, before continuing to another language, otherwise just more confusion. I'm trying Dutch and then German and they have similarities that's confusing. So I'm going finish the easier Dutch first then continue to German.

1 year ago
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