"I will go to college the year after next."

Translation:再来年は大学に行きます。

July 9, 2017

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JustinCain2

What does the さ mean in this sentence because without it it says its wrong.

July 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP

It is another weird combination of Kana and Kanji in Duo.

来年(らいねん) is next year and 再来年(さらいねん) is the year after next.

July 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffWhite373278

Nothing weird about Duolingo not using kanji or at least furigana.

August 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TrinityYun

ことし=今年= this year 来年=らいねん= next year 再来年=さらいねん= the year after next year

EXAMPLES: 一昨日=おととい= the day before yesterday 昨日=きのう= yesterday 今日=きょう= today 明日= あした= tomorrow 明後日= あさって= the day after tomorrow

This all makes sense yeah?

November 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/benhyk

さ (再) is a loan word from chinese meaning “again”. In chinese, for example, 再見 (zaijian) literally means to see again and is used as a farewell. 再来年 is a usage that doesn't exist in Chinese however, we use 今年 (jinnian, this year), 明年 (mingnian, next year), 後年(hounian, year after next year, i.e. 2 years away) and 大後年 (dahounian, year after the year after next, i.e. 3 years away). The latter two aren't as commonly used in Mandarin but do see use in Cantonese.

December 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP

I have just noticed that this sentence may have problem… Do native Japanese really say they "go" to university/college? The way I know is to "enter" 入る。

Any opinion?

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidKames

They use いく

October 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/koorishin

Well actually hariu means the action that you get into a place, walk into, run into or else. It's literally like they have difference between go to and enter. I go to school.学校に行く。

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PukkaEllingworth

I hate the word College, where i'm from it's for students aged 16-18, in France it's for 13-15 year olds, in Canada it's Tertiary education (but not the super academic kind, that's university...though some universities have colleges in them in lots of countries including Canada!?) and the Yanks call everything after school "college"...which they also call "school"!??

In the UK, Oceania, South Asia and Southern Africa, "college" may refer to a secondary school, 6th form college, a college of further education, a training institution that awards trade qualifications or a higher education provider that does not have university status

Wouldn't it be easier if they had the english translation of 大学 as "university" as it's much less ambiguous?

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/luisguichard

What is the difference between に and へ in this context?

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP

Basically you are talking about the same thing with に and へ. You have a map in your mind with the college on the map, and you draw an arrow from where you are to the college. The difference is, with に, you mean where the arrow tip is, and with へ you mean the direction of the arrow.

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TrinityYun

私は大学に行く= I will go to college

私は大学へ行く= I am headed to college (right now)

November 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul252681

I feel like 入学する would be more appropriate...

December 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mccaaww

Is the は necessary in this sentence?

February 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/martin.mk

Not really.

May 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaquinPokki

「来年大学は行きます」Does this work? How does moving the は change what the sentence means?

January 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MatejKilk

You cannot just clump two nouns together like that. You need a particle between "rainen" and "daigaku"

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/martin.mk

You can actually omit the は after 来年, but you're still missing a に after 大学, which is the only correct particle here.

May 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Albur_Godwin

How about this other choice of particles?
大学さ来年行きます
I know that は can replace other particles (such as が, for instance), but can it replace に as the (implicit) destination marker?
(Notice that the に in my own sentence is intended as a time marker, and thus yet something else.)

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JWong60254

No, because temporal nouns can't take the に particle. (It would be like saying "on the year after next")

June 21, 2019
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