"Él tiene una enfermedad del corazón."

Traducción:He has a heart disease.

Hace 1 año

28 comentarios


https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

En inglés "heart disease" no es contable. Debería ser "He has heart disease." Sin embargo, "heart condition" es contable: "He has a heart condition."

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

In English, it can be "he has a heart disease." Or it can be "he has heart disease." In English, "disease" is a count noun.

I believe that "heart disease" is an example of a noun that can be both count, and non-count, depending on circumstances.

https://staff.washington.edu/marynell/grammar/noncount.html

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

Sure, some people somewhere have undoubtedly uttered "a heart disease" (among other potential reasons, non-countable nouns still usually have countable uses: "two literatures" meaning "two types / schools of literature"), but let's remember the audience of this course: non-native speakers, beginner English learners at that. They need to concentrate on general, common usage. In the Corpus of Contemporary American English plain "heart disease" beats "a heart disease" by a factor of 450:1 (and it would be a good deal more than that if one eliminated irrelevant occurrences like "a heart disease patient"). For comparison "disease" beats "a disease" by only 23:1. Clearly, there is something different happening between "heart disease" and "disease."

Correspondingly, the link you've provided lists "heart disease" as a non-count noun, which is self-evidently true the overwhelming majority of the time. The Oxford Dictionary agrees, explicitly listing "heart disease" as an example of a mass noun:

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Just yesterday, my mother was talking about heart disease and some different kinds of heart diseases. One of her friends has a heart disease.

A search on Google for "a heart disease" had 16,100,000 results. That is considerably more than "some." "Heart diseases" has 11,300,000 results

"Heart disease", in general, may be used more frequently than "a heart disease," but my point still stands. I don't think 16 million uses makes the term uncommonly used.

"Heart disease" is one kind of "disease". It is a more specific concept that than "diseases in general". But there are various, more specifically designated, types of "heart disease."

Here is an article on "heart disease" and "heart diseases" http://www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/types#overview1

This article specifically lists six forms (types) of heart disease, that is, six heart diseases. It states that there are also other types; that there are other heart diseases.

See also this article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-disease/basics/definition/con-20034056. It says that "heart disease" is a "umbrella" term under which are several more specific forms of heart disease. As it notes, many heart diseases can be prevented or treated.

The definition of a "count noun" is a noun, specific examples of of which one can count. By that definition, "heart disease" is/ can be a count noun.

Non-count nouns have no plural form. As I said previously, As used in the articles I reference, "disease" is count noun-- it can be used in plural, and in the singular. "So is "heart disease".

By the way, note that I stated that I "believe" it (disease) might be an example of a noun which could be both "count" and "non-count." (But I did not assert that as definite, because I did not research that.)

Of course this (Duolingo) is for people learning English. That is why I make comments-- to help people learn English. As a person who teaches writing in English to college students, and as an editor of professional journals (in English), I am fairly knowledgeable about, and competent in, English.

And since my university has a good international program, and I have had many students from Spain, and Mexico (and other Spanish-speaking countries), I have known, and helped, with their English, many native Spanish speakers.

Why deny English learners the opportunity to learn that, in the correct context, "a disease" or "disease" (in general) can both be appropriately used? Especially on a topic as important to people as "heart disease" (of which there are several forms, that is, several types/kinds of heart diseases.).

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

From where I sit the links you are posting keep making my point: "heart disease" is overwhelmingly used in a non-countable manner. How does the second one begin? "Heart disease describes a range of conditions that affect your heart." Yep, just like I said "heart condition" is a standard countable alternative.

If you'd actually looked at those purported 16 million matches for "a heart disease" you'd see a good chunk of them, well, aren't really. What's on the first page? "a heart disease risk"; "a heart disease-related event"; "a heart disease risk factor" — clearly all entirely irrelevant.

If you want to believe the editors of the Oxford Dictionary mark "heart disease" as a mass noun with no actual basis just to confuse people, then I guess that's your prerogative. Native Spanish speakers won't have any trouble coming up with "a heart disease"; it's a word-by-word translation of what comes naturally to them. What they need to be taught in order to most authentically imitate native speech is the overwhelming non-countability of this common term, which is a linguistic aspect actually different from Spanish.

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

It would appear this is simply (unsurprisingly, given that this whole conversation started based on my observation that the word-by-word translation into English isn't very natural) a topic where the two languages differ thoroughly as to definiteness and countability: http://context.reverso.net/translation/english-spanish/have+heart+disease http://context.reverso.net/translation/english-spanish/has+heart+disease

Hace 11 meses

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
  • 20
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 1173

Tienes toda la razón.

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/mariavictoriapp

Hola quisiera saber cual es la diferencia entre 'illness' y 'disease' cuando de bo utilizar una y cuando la otra?

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
  • 20
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 1173

Disease: tu doctor(a) dice que tienes una enfermedad específica. Sin embargo, es posible que te sientas bien. Illness es una palabra más general desde el punto de visto del paciente (que se siente mal).

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0
Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/davichofarkas007

y heart sickness?? porque no está correcto?

Hace 11 meses

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

Por regla general, no se usa. No se encuentra en el Corpus of Contemporary American English, a diferencia de "heart disease", que aparece en más de 6500 fragmentos.

Hace 11 meses

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

DL accepts: "he has heart disease."

Hace 5 meses

https://www.duolingo.com/LeiiCabrera

¿Cuándo se utiliza "illness" y cuándo se utiliza "disease"?

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/PedroMartn786191

¿Y por qué no está bien: "He has a disease of the heart" ?

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/LuzMelidaSanchez

heart illness está mal dicho? no me lo acepta

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

Según Google Ngrams, "heart disease" es aproximadamente 3000 veces más común. Supongo que nunca en mi vida haya oído "heart illness". Para mí estos dos hechos serían suficiente para decir que no hay razón particular para aceptarlo. No obstante, no es algún tipo de violación clara de las reglas del idioma inglés y se pueden encontrar unos ejemplos en Google (aunque "heart disease" tiene 600 veces más), entonces otros podrían tener una opinión diferente.

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/SenhaPaca
SenhaPaca
  • 16
  • 11
  • 9
  • 5

Lee la explicación arriba de Sara Galesa, es banstante más clara. "Porque lo dice más gente" no me parece una explicación aunque es un buen indicativo. Hay expresiones que pueden decirse solo en un país o en una región y no en el resto de países y no por eso son incorrectas.

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/leonelmes

cuando se usa illness o disease ? help

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

Lee el hilo :)

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/leonelmes

now is clear, thank ¡

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/1952201632513302

mi respuesta "he has an heart's illness" por qué dice duoingo estar mal????

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

Un hablante nativo nunca lo diría así. (Y tiene que ser "a" en vez de "an" delante de "heart"; la "h" se pronuncia en los dialectos estándares.)

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/1952201632513302

Gracias. Todos los dias me enredo más.

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/Ren133352

No sé quién programa el sitio, pero seguramente no domina ni el Español ni el Inglés, seguramente programa lo que le indican poner sin discusión, pues en ocasiones las traducciones tienden a lo literal y otras a como seria la aplicación del idioma sobre la frase para que sea entendida en el contexto de su propia gramática. Es una pena porque eso hace que se repitan los ejercicios para reforzar lo que probablemente se vuelva un vicio al hablar o una mala acepción. Como dato curioso me llama la atención que los ejemplos en Inglés tienden a los que hablan de violencia y en Alemán a los de comida...

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

pero seguramente no domina ni el Español ni el Inglés

Hay más que una persona, pero creo que son hablantes nativos de o español o inglés y por ende, dependiendo de la frase, una version o la otra puede haber un problema.

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/jjmelguizo

"He has a heart's illness" por que está mal expresado?

Hace 1 año

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

No sé si hay otra explicación aparte de que no es idiomático. "Heart illness" ya suena bastante raro. "Heart disease" es 3.000 veces más común en Google NGrams.

Hace 1 año
Aprende inglés en solo 5 minutos diarios. Completamente gratis.