"He has three older brothers."

Translation:かれはおにいさんが三人います。

1 year ago

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Skgr136

Does the number have to come after the noun?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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Phrased in this way, yes. I think you could also say 三人のお兄さん, as with other counters.

That's simply how phrasing works with counters in Japanese - you can either use "[number+counter]の[noun]は/が[verb]", or "[noun]は/が[counter][verb]".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
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My instinct was to start this sentence 彼には, and this was accepted. What is the difference between saying 彼には and just 彼は? Are they interchangeable in this circumstance? I know that there are other circumstances where 彼には would not be appropriate but I'm curious if there is any difference in connotation here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasKind7

The most frustrating thing about these lessons is not being able to hear the the correct enunciation of a sentence I got wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DivinaAlex

I'm pretty sure that Duolingo has so far been presenting me with people-count sentences like this one without the "ga" or any particle -which surprised me at the time- so I'm a bit miffed it now required it for "correct".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrettTomck

Inconsistent translation of oniisan as older brother or simply brother between questions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_jclipse
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You use different words when referring to your own family vs someone else's. In this case, it's あに for your own and おにいさん for someone else's.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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In animes, I see everyone treating everyone with nichan and nechan. Are these related to 'brother' and 'sister'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleHobbit13

It's an issue of formality. Both "nii-chan" and "nee-chan" still mean brother and sister, respectively, but there's a difference in the nature of the relationship. The "-chan" honorific is incredibly informal, especially when used for anyone older than a child. They've removed the "o-" honorific prefix, which adds even more respect in a title.

So when you hear "nii-chan" or "nee-chan" in anime, you can generally assume it's a pretty close relationship or, depending on tone of voice, super condescending and disrespectful. (You usually hear it used in anime as the former though.)

Honorifics are great because they can tell you SO much about a relationship REAL quick.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pudgiebudgie

Is が usually (/ always) used with いる / ある?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeVaHd
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Yes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanSuckow

Why it is かれは instead of かれの?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xyvyrianeth

かれの means "his", so to use that instead of かれは would mean "His 3 older brothers" instead of "He has 3 older brothers".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crugland1
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The subject of the sentence is "he," not "his older brothers." I think you would have to change the verb from "having" to "being" 3 people. Is that right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
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I thought ~います was "there exists", so expected 「かれのお兄さんが三人います」 to work as "there are three older brothers of his" :o)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
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いる does mean "to exist", but to describe possession in Japanese, you use the form (roughly literal) "As for X, Y exists" or "Xは Yがいる". So, this sentence reads literally as "As for him, three older brothers exist."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
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So why does の exist at all, then?

[this is what's called a rhetorical question, because you seemed to be telling me that possession is only indicated with XはYがいます :-P]

[editing for clarity] So anyway, in my fevered imagination, I was trying to work out how to say "three brothers exist" and thought "かれのきょうだい" would be the way to go, and ... well, I was curious.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
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For when you indicate possession by a determiner modifying a noun, or by a proper noun possessing something. So, whenever you translate "his, her, its, my, your, our," etc. E.g., "my older brothers are funny", "I read your book", "Dr. Takata's friend lives here", "the tiger's coat is smooth", and so on. This "As for X, Y exists" structure is only when you're translating "X has Y".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
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The subject is "he" only in the English sentence, not in Japanese. The topic is "he" in Japanese (what the sentence is about) and the subject is "three older brothers" (those doing the action of existing).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ze_Batata
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は indicates the topic of the sentence -> "Xは" = "In regard to X". の indicates possession -> "XのY" = " Y of X". "XのYは" = "In regard to the Y of X"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleHobbit13

Ok, I'm struggling a little with combining particles with the counting. Why does the が come before the count rather than after it? Like, why is it not お兄さんが三人 rather than お兄さん三人が?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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That's simply how phrasing works with counters in Japanese - you can either use "[number+counter]の[noun]は/が[verb]", or "[noun]は/が[counter][verb]".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kurros
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I'm confused, the translation given above is "かれはおにいさんが三人いま", isn't that what LittleHobbit13 wants? Is that not correct? Or does he just have a superfluous "not" in his question which makes it the opposite of what he wanted to ask?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Ok.... I've inverted the "ga" and "wa" particles:

  • かれおにいさん三人います vs. かれおにいさん三人います

Why is that? Isn't "he (かれ)" not the subject of the sentence?

(If you'd like to be certain that I saw your answer, please write "danmoller" anywhere in the answer. Thanks a lot).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
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'He' is the subject of the English sentence "He has three older brothers", but most definitely not the subject of the Japanese sentence. The Japanese literally translates to "As for him, three older brothers exist." 'Him/he' is the topic of the sentence here, meaning that which the sentence is about, and takes the particle -は; 'older brothers' is the subject of the verb 'exist' (います), meaning that which does the action of existing, and takes the particle -が.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofia701655
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I've read somewhere to think of が not as the subject marker but as an "identifier", and it often helps. Like in this sentence, "he" is the topic and "brothers" is the thing he has three of. Hope it made sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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"He" is definitely the subject of the sentence, in both English and in Japanese (かれ).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CKj79lUj
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why do we have to use the formal word for "brothers"? I used "kyoodai", is it possible?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giorgishen1

Is お necessary?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/takoponi
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にいさは三人がいます ^?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nevadensis

I'm confused with the uses of the particles "wa" and "ga" in this sentence. Shouldn't He be the subject here? Or is it like this because the older brothers are the ones doing the action of... existing?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
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It's the latter. 'He' is the subject of the English sentence "He has three older brothers", but not of the Japanese sentence, which is literally, "As for him, three older brothers exist." "He" gets the topic particle -は because it's what the sentence is about; but "older brothers" gets the subject particle -が because they are doing the action of existing.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nevadensis

Thank you, Sean! Japanese is such a different language, its structures are so interesting! So, in a sentence where we have two "topics" or "objects" (I don't know how to call it... potential subjects?) the subject is going to be the latter one or not necessarily?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
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Not necessarily, and word order is more flexible in Japanese since nouns and pronouns are given their roles by the particles attached to them, rather than their place in the sentence, although it's generally more natural for the topic to come first.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tai40777

This question appears to only accept the kanji for three.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lizzykwoky

Why does the います necessary, instead of just ます?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RVJioWts

います is the verb "to exist/to have" (for animate objects, like people).

ます itself is just the ending verbs get when they get conjugated to the non-past polite form. Your question would be like saying, "Why do I have to use たべます for 'eat' instead of just ます?"

The い isn't just a random letter put there for politeness or anything. It is a core part of the word that must be there or else you're saying an entirely different word.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lizzykwoky

Why does the い have to come before the ます?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RinAsami

Because います means basically "to exist." So to break down the sentence literally it would be something like:

かれ - He, は - particle, おにいさん - older brother, が - particle, 三人 - three persons/people, います - exist

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CG9x7mTu

Duolingo's error highlighting sucks terribly. I made a mistake near the end of my input, and also didn't use an お for "he"'s brother (which is near the beginning of the input). So, when telling me what I did wrong, it should underline errors based on the type of answer it accepted: one without the お.

But the answer with お is used to calculate underlining for errors, making it all wrong and offset by one!!!

Whoever committed this code should be shamed, and after a proper shaming they should fix it. I know it isn't easy or fun, but if it was, it wouldn't be called software development.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sbstratos79

Why is it 彼はお兄さん and not 彼のお兄さん?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sbstratos79

Oh crap just checked and somebody else has already asked this question (and gotten downvoted for it)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cookie-san

Hmm... Why does the translation keep giving the phrase 'Kare wa oniisan ga san nin imasu' instead of 'Kare no...'? Won't the 'no' particle be appropriate here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GodSpeedx0
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Kare wa = As for him, ...

Still learning, but here's how I've seen it explained. The main use of the は (wa) particle is to identify the subject of the sentence. Here's how I translate sentences with は in my head:

わたしはアメリカ人です = As for me, I am American.

は let's your audience know that what came before it is the subject, what you're talking about. I use "As for ____, ... " to help make sense of what the subject is and to figure out if I should use はwhen going from English to Japanese.

Hope that was right! And I hope it helps!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thomsario

Makes sense to me! の Isn't used because you're not saying "his older brothers are three of them," you're saying, "as for him, three older brothers." So the possessive の isn't really used here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/masterp443

Kare no = his

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DemstarAus
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It's slightly confusing to me too, but the way I understand it is we are talking about this "him" and how many brothers there are, rather than him having or owning three brothers.

1 month ago
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