1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Die Menschen haben Hunger."

"Die Menschen haben Hunger."

Translation:The people are hungry.

March 7, 2013

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/creche

Are Menschen and Leute inter-changeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lenkvist

You can use both for people, but "Menschen" can also be translated as "humans".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MThoriqMalano

what's the singular form of die Menschen ? Is it der Mensch ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nhaines

Correct, "der Mensch" and "die Menschen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tisrandi

Menschen means people, though, right? so how is there a singular? Or would the singular be human?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anni-666

"Menschen" literally means "humans" and "Leute" means more like "people". So "der Mensch" would be something like "a human being".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EleniaT

I imagine der Mensch is the person?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rshooty

Anyone have a pointer for hearing "Madchen" and "Menschen" distinctly? (I haven't seen it... menschenioned... yet) (Serious inquiry though, puns aside)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csavage2808

the first syllable of Madchen sounds more like "maid", and the first syllable of Menschen sounds more like "men". (correct me if I'm wrong)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robinj

When I didn't capitalize Hunger, it told me that all nouns have to be capitalized. Why is Hunger a noun in this context? It's certainly an adjective in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Komma

If you translate "Die Menschen haben Hunger" word by word it means "the people have hunger" in this sentence hunger is also a noun in english. Also the word "Hunger" is always a noun in german. the adjective is "hungrig". You can also say "Die Menschen sind hungrig"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nhaines

Hunger is most certainly not an adjective in English, it's only a noun. The adjectival form of "hunger" is "hungry".

You're right that in English we don't talk about having hunger, but about being hungry. This is an idiomatic difference between English and German (or English and Spanish). It's also one of the fun things about learning other languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesse.pitstick

It can also be a verb in English, as in "I hunger"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RageOnery

Yes I was thinking that also, as hunger is an active state (description of a feeling as well as a metabolic process) within the body.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkRaven5

Are all plurals feminine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joey31415

Not all plural nouns are feminine, but you do use "die" when something is plural no matter what the gender of the noun is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamAlDesouky

Why is Hunger capitalized? It isn't a noun...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nhaines

Yes, "hunger" is an abstract noun. That's why German uses "Hunger haben".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krs777

I got this wrong. I wrote, "The people have hunger." Why is that wrong? Is that not EXACTLY what it says?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wales20

Because in english we say I am hungry, not I have hunger English which is already weird Is one of the only languages that uses that most languages say "I have ..." Like In french J'ia douze ans" wich means i am 12 but could be translated as I have twelve years


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexander_kramer

how would "those people are hungry" translate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrainstormESCU

Diese Menschen haben Hunger.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianeAlberts

I don't recall Mensch or Menchen being introduced. Did I miss something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessRoamalot

I find it hard to hear the difference between Menschen and Madchen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne254796

I put that the people have a hunger.... apparently I was wrong...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zappyface

In English it's are hungry. Also I don't think hunger can be singular (at least not here)

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.