https://www.duolingo.com/nicholas_ashley

indirect transitive French verbs

A French verb is deemed transitive if it has an object, either a direct object or an indirect object. Intransitive verbs on the other hand never have objects.

So in the sentence Je parle à ma mere. the verb parler is acting as an indirect transitive verb according to the Texas university website for learning French - https://www.laits.utexas.edu/tex/pr/vti1.html

My question is how can you tell if a French verb is acting as an indirect transitive verb or simply as an intransitive verb ? For instance in the following sentences, are the verbs entrer & courir acting as indirect transitive verbs or intransitive verbs.

il entre dans le bureau
il court à l’école

Finally, do you know a reference that provides a list of indirect transitive French verbs ?

July 10, 2017

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Maddrex
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Hi!

In the context of "il entre dans le bureau", enter is a indirect transitive verb, but he can be a intransitive verb (ex: My little brother enters)

And "il court à l'école", courir is acting as intransitive verbs.

I found this list of indirect transitive verbs : http://www.conjugaisonverbe.fr/verbes/liste-verbes-transitifs-indirects.html

(I learn English, sorry for errors. Hope you will understand) :)

Cordialement, Maddrex

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholas_ashley

Maddrex

Thank you very much. One clarification. You say the verb entrer can act as an indirect transitive verb but in the reference you provided to a list of indirect transitive verbs, the verb entrer doesn't appear. Is that because the list is not exhaustive ?

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Maddrex
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nicholas_ashley

It's depend of the context of the sentence, the verb can be intransitif or transitif

ex: Il a poussé sa voiture (He pushed his car) = a poussé is a direct transitive verb, because we can say : He pushed who? /He pushed what ? The answer: His car

Cette plante a poussé! (This plant grew)= a poussé is a intransitive verb, because we can't say: The plant grew what?/ This plant grew who? No answer

I know it's not clear, i will try to detailed this more

We know if it is a intransitive if there no answer to questions/ transitive direct if there a answer to the question( he pushed who or what?) / transitive indirect if there a answer to the question(he pushed "insert a preposition" who or what?)

In French, we use this to distinguish all of those verbs!

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Maddrex
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There have a lot of videos on the subject on the Internet and i see that, in English, we don't learn this in the same way as French xD But i found this: https://youtu.be/SpL2o3jjfoA

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
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I think that many verbs can be either intransitive or transitive with direct and/or direct objects.

http://la-conjugaison.nouvelobs.com/regles/grammaire/les-verbes-transitifs-et-intransitifs-152.php

The wordreference website is handy for checking parts of speech, definitions, and usage of verbs or any other words.

http://www.wordreference.com/fren/entrer

http://www.wordreference.com/fren/courir

In your first example, "ma mère" is an indirect object. However, I'm not entirely sure if the locations can be considered an indirect object in these sentences (caveat: my sense of grammar tends to be more intuitive so I'm not an expert). This was an interesting discussion that I found about this. Perhaps "dans le bureau" and "a l'école" would be considered prepositional phrases rather than objects? https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/direct-object-as-location.2188290/

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholas_ashley

thanks

July 10, 2017
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