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  5. "I am really hungry."

"I am really hungry."

Translation:本当にお腹がすきました。

July 10, 2017

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhyaisme

Since no one answered, I will try my best to explain the confusion on the purpose of に here to the best of my knowledge and as simple as it can be.

| 本当/ほんとう/hontō = truth, fact, reality | It is categorized as a noun or an adjectival noun.

| 本当に/ほんとうに/hontōni = truly, really | It is categorized as an adverb.

The addition of に here changes the root form of 本当 to its adverb form 本当に, so it means "truly" here. に here in this case DOES NOT exist as a particle that denotes destination or target (although if you really wanna put it that way and ignore everything else, it literally means "to the truth"); ほんとうに is a united phrase that says "truly".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

yeah you can use に to change nouns and na-adjectives into adverbs. Very well written.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sword916

Thanks for the explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smokey42

Doesn't the ました indicate past tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiritsuguZFC

Yes, but おなかがすきました is more or less a set expression that means "(I'm) hungry". すく literally means "to get empty" , so literally it is like "(My) stomach got empty" thus you are hungry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Al-AmriAri

After all, the opposite of hungry is full.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnekaKnell

Boy, my stomach has gotten empty. (Its awkward in english, but it works)

Its one of those borderline idiomatic things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HapaxHypatia

What does the に do here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HapaxHypatia

Also, how on earth do I follow a thread so i can actually see someone's reply?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo456036

Is the に really nesecary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefaniaMa27

So how do you say "I was hungry"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natto591178

Is this a proper use of hontou or is Duo being overly literal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I believe ほんとうに can be used as an intensifier in Japanese just as "really" can be in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewASC1234

Is it? I mean, if you use hontou by itself, it means really, but that's not the same really as "really (very) hungry."

It seems more like it is "Truly, I am hungry."

Like youre telling people to believe youre hungry. Not the intensity of your hunger.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orion-the-Red

I think hontou is much the same as "really (very)", or at least it's only differentiated between quality and quantity by speaking. Like, if you knock down someone's coffee, "hontounisumimasen deshita!" would be equivalent to "I'm really very sorry!" but "ho-ntou ni, sumimasen. warukatta na." would be more like "Truly, I'm sorry. I messed up."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rcalam

is "ほんてうにおながすいています" also valid? i learned "suite" from another app.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhaphazard

空いた is the plain version of the polite 空きました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shoshinshajon

Gauging by the number of Google results (not the best barometer, but without input from a native speaker, you have to go with what you have), すいた beats out すいている by a three to one margin. I also originally learned すいている, but evidently that is not the most common way it's said. Beyond that, I couldn't say more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orion-the-Red

the verb is suku, お腹が空く, and so the ita and kimashita forms are both past tense, informal and formal respectively. Duo has been defaulting to increasingly formal constructions; but onaka ga suita is common enough that you may actually be learning grammar to avoid idioms here.

(BTW my dictionary probably auto-generates forms based on rules but I cannot wait to find this negative conditional form in the wild: "if someone weren't to become hungry"; "お腹が空かなかったら")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/secret_sAndwich

”I am truly hungry."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianTepes4

got right: おなかがとてもすきました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronCappra

i wrote "onaka ga hontouni sukimashita" and it was marked correct, but the suggested sentence was "hontouni onaka ga sukimashita", why both are correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

report it, both are correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lightning97

What would be the casual and informal way to say this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wACA979499

お腹がすく=空腹 では?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PalaeoJoe

Sometimes i am delightedly surprised at how similarly Japanese expresses things like English does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fanamatic

So does "onaka" mean stomach?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia543869

本当にどうもありがとう。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mgaristova

If 空きました/空いた literally means "got empty” how would I say "I got (I felt) hungry"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momonga278702

The sentence in English is in present tense, but the Japanese in past tense. Can you please fix it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZkqqNmgo

お腹が本当に吹きました。

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