https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

What is 'candy' in English?

Japanese words 'アメ' and 'キャンディ' is almost same. And I confirmed Duolongo's pulldown (the answer) page. It shows 'あめ candy candies'. So I believed 'アメ' is 'キャンディ'. And I believed 'キャンディ' is 'candy', too. But I felt something. And I searched 'candy' in the internet. Something odd. And Japanese candy like this... https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%A3%B4 アメ https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%82%AD%E3%83%A3%E3%83%B3%E3%83%87%E3%82%A3 キャンディ

In Japan, The 'KitKat' is not 'キャンディ'. I want to hear your opinion. I am waiting. (°▽°)

ゆっくり読んでます。 I am reading slowly.

my other forum about indicate Japanese sentence. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/23449994

July 11, 2017

81 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

What LupoMikt said is very true and legit: "A lot of things in the second picture I wouldn't know the name of, so I'd call it candy." However, even when one whom doesn't know the name of the food (desserts, chocolates, lollipops = food), can refer to something as 'candy.' If you have read my other post, and maybe you have, 'Candy,' is the category for which we name all of that food group into one: Candy. Then we have 'sub categories' for the specific 'type' of Candy (not the specific name, e.g. chocolates, Lollypops ect.). Then we can name the candy in the food group.

Here are a couple examples on how we would call something 'candy:' The first is based along what LupoMikt mentioned.

  1. I am walking along the sidewalk, and I see something super small and wrapped in plastic by the curb (It'd most likely be obvious to tell it's food category). I walk over to it and I pick it up (I know, gross right). I look at it and ask myself, "I wonder what candy/piece of candy this is or is called?

So if it appears to be something we do not know the 'group' of or specific name of it, we call it 'candy.' If I had saw a chocolate bar on the ground, I would have called it a candy bar, or most likely, a 'chocolate bar.'

2: Someone invites me over to there house. I say not right now, but they persist, and go on to say, "Please? We have candy!"

Now take note that, while they may even have chocolate with the rest of the candy, they aren't going to say, "We have candy, and some chocolate." They would just place the chocolate (which can and will sometimes be referred to as candy), and place is in the candy category. They also wouldn't name each individual piece of candy they have, e.g "We have some skittles, snickers, m & m's, gum, ect."

So when many of the food 'group' is placed into one thing, and you don't want to individually name each sub category, e.g group, then you would classify it as it's category, and say "Candy."

3: Say some parents left their kids at home for a little bit, and before leaving they said, "Don't eat too much candy." This would refer back to my #2 example, where instead of just naming each thing they couldn't eat, they made it quicker and referred to it as it's 'Category,' candy. Now, even though Cake, donuts, pie, coffee cake ect, aren't classified as 'candy (some of them are 'Pastries'), the kids would know what the parents were talking about (unless they're being a smart alek), and would not eat too many 'sweets.'

So although the parents didn't say sweets, and just candy, in that sentence, 'Candy,' could also be referred to as sweets. Most people including kids, would understand that reference, so the parents wouldn't need to go on and continue to specify what they mean.

These are the main ways when we refer to candy, and, "Candy."

Hope this helps.

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Thank you! very interesting for many specific name. :D

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

Your very welcome. I just hope is wasn't too confusing, lol.

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Let's eat chocolates when I am confusing. :D

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

Tastes good to me!

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

I eat too much chocolate. (´ー`)

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

And I barely eat any, :(

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

ええっ!? (´Д` ) Really?

September 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malwen
  • 1790

I'm British and I would call the items in the links you posted "sweets". Sweets on sticks are called lollipops or lollies. I would refer to a Kitkat as either a chocolate bar or a chocolate biscuit. Hope that helps.

July 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

Definitely. Pretty much the only time I ever use the word "candy" is when it is part of the name of the following two things: "candy floss" (綿菓子) and "candy cane" (杖形のキャンディー).

If I had to say what I think the word "candy" on its own actually means, I'd say it refers to the substance of certain types of sweets that are made almost entirely out of sugar. I guess, at a stretch, I might also refer to that specific category of sweets as the "candy" category. (The pictures in those two Japanese wikipedia links are roughly the kind of sweets I'm on about.)

I would never refer to a KitKat as "a candy". I can't even picture the word "candy" as having anything to do with chocolate. A KitKat is just a "chocolate bar" or "chocolate biscuit".

I'm British too and completely agree with everything you said. ^^

July 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

I am confusung...

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

*confused I think. I am, too :) I'm American. Everything in those Wikipedia articles seems to be candy for me, as are KitKat bars, chocolate bars, and the like.

All of this:

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaoSilver

I'm American, and I agree with this post.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aristophania

In Australia, we call the first picture 'chocolates' and the second picture 'lollies' (except for the stuff on wooden sticks - they're 'lollypops').

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

They each have they're own specific name to each candy, as well as each group. However, to specify the food group, in a more general sense (so as not to have to name each group of 'candy' specifically e.g. chocolate, lollies/lollypops), we classify the category as 'Candy.

So everything in the pictures above are called 'candy.'

Now, this may be confusing, but all candy could potentially be dessert. However, not all desserts* could be called candy. Example:

A babe Ruth (a chocolate bar = Desserts & candy.

However,

Cake = Dessert. Not candy.

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Same for Hong Kong - the first picture is definitely chocolates (except for the lollipops) and not candies but I definitely understand Americans call all of them candies!

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

@ KeithWong9

OK, this is going to get confusing (I feel bad for the Japanese speakers...) but I actually wouldn't usually refer to the individual things in the top picture as "candies"! Some of the ones in the bottom picture I would, though.

I think the distinction is that "candy" as an uncountable noun, refers to all such things, but "candy" as a countable noun (i.e. takes an ordinary plural) seems more applicable to small, single bite-size items of candy. Perhaps if the top picture had all the wrappers off, I would find "candies" more natural. Not sure.

sora_Japan, I'm just... sorry! bet you didn't think you were asking a question with such diverse (and complicated) answers around the English-speaking world!

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

If you actually don't think of the things in the top picture as being part of the class of things referred to as "candy," then that would indeed be a difference.

Not only would I not refer to them as candy, but I'd also say they aren't candy (neither in a countable nor uncountable sense).

I think the distinction is that "candy" as an uncountable noun, refers to all such things, but "candy" as a countable noun (i.e. takes an ordinary plural) seems more applicable to small, single bite-size items of candy.

I would say even the bottom picture isn't "candy" as a countable noun. I'd say "candy" as a countable noun doesn't exist.

Further to that, I wouldn't refer to the items in either of those pictures as being the uncountable noun "candy"!

I might well be wrong (and I should definitely just look it up in a dictionary rather than just typing my assumption), but I don't think "candy" as a word on its own even exists in British English! When I wrote what I think the word candy means, I only meant the definition I'd come up with if I had to make one up for it. :P

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Yeah, there's no question British and American usage differ greatly in this area :)

We also say "sweets," but it refers to pretty much all dessert-like foods that have a lot of sugar. And I don't think we'd ever say "a sweet" (although I don't know if you guys would either).

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

@piguy3 It's a shame I can't reply to any of your comments directly. xD

We sometimes call desserts at the end of a meal "sweets". That's a different kind of sweet. I'm not sure if this is the same as what you mean? I actually thought this particular usage was something only used in British English (and even then I rarely hear anyone call it this—mostly elderly people).

We do indeed say "a sweet". A person with an opened packet of sweets (such as a packet of Haribo, Skittles, ...Jolly Rancher?) might say "Would you like a sweet?". I assume you would say for this "Would you like a candy?" ?

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

You mean that some in Britain use the word "sweets" as a synonym for "dessert" (i.e. final phase of a meal)? No, we don't do this. "Sweets" is just a broad category of foodstuffs.

For most of the of mass-market available-everywhere pre-packaged candies (here used as the plural of the uncountable candy, meaning "type/brand of candy"), I almost certainly would just say, "Would you like one?" or use the brand name ("Would you like a Skittle?") when offering some to somebody else. I personally at least would reserve countable "candy" largely for a pretty narrow swath of the candy universe, especially bite-sized hard ones (like you have to suck on them as opposed to chew them) e.g. Werther's (Googling I see the bag is even labeled "candies").

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

@piguy3 Yeah. For Skittles especially, it would definitely be more likely we too would say "Would you like a Skittle?", but it would also be possible to say "Would you like a sweet?". I needed to use an example that I was confident of being sold internationally, but I could only think of Skittles at the time. I wasn't sure which sweets are common between Britain and the US.

Skittles is well known and rolls off the tongue, but you mean that you'd also say "Would you like a Jolly Rancher?" rather than just saying candy in this case?

How about this hypothetical situation:

You haven't brought up sweets in the conversation, haven't shown the bag of sweets, and it's just an unbranded assortment (like a "pick-n-mix")... Maybe the person you're about to talk to is facing the other way in a daydream and you're going to offer her/him a sweet to get a conversation going...

In this case, wouldn't you have to say "Would you like a candy?". You wouldn't be able to say a brand name or "one" in this situation. Here in the UK, the most normal thing to say would be "Would you like a sweet?". ^^

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

but you mean that you'd also say "Would you like a Jolly Rancher?" rather than just saying candy in this case?

Yes, that's definitely a candy that's commonly referred to individually. They are of the type of candy (hard, to be sucked on) that I would call "a candy," but given that there is a clear name for them available, I would use it.

In your hypothetical case, I'd say "Would you like a piece of candy?" Frankly, I'd probably say that even if the type of candy I were offering happened to be one of the ones where "a candy" could also be natural.

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

(>▽<)yummy!

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

They each have they're own specific name to each candy, as well as each group. However, to specify the food group, in a more general sense (so as not to have to name each group of 'candy' specifically e.g. chocolate, lollies/lollypops), we classify the category as 'Candy.

So everything in the pictures above are called 'candy.'

Now, this may be confusing, but all candy could potentially be dessert. However, not all desserts* could be called candy. Example:

A babe Ruth (a chocolate bar = Desserts & candy.

However,

Cake = Dessert. Not candy.

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

JackMartianさん

Thank you from Mars? I say 'デザート' as 'food after meal'. sweets or fruits etc. perhaps.

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupoMikti

Perhaps this is regional, but I typically don't refer to anything chocolate as 'candy' but as 'chocolate'. I'm from Northern California, for reference. In fact, for pretty much every chocolate thing in the first picture, I would refer to it by name instead (i.e. "Snickers", "Almond Joy", "Twix", "M&Ms", "KitKat"... you get the idea).

Actually, I think that might go for anything that has a specific name like mentioned. A lot of things in the second picture I wouldn't know the name of, so I'd call it candy.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

What you said is very true and legit. However, even when one whom doesn't know the name of the food (desserts, chocolates, lollipops = food), can refer to something as 'candy.' If you have read my post a couple up, and maybe you have, 'Candy,' is the category for which we name all of that food group into one: Candy. Then we have 'sub categories' for the specific 'type' of Candy (not the specific name, e.g. chocolates, Lollypops ect.). Then we can name the candy in the food group.

Here are a couple examples on how we would call something 'candy:' The first is based along what you mentioned.

  1. I am walking along the sidewalk, and I see something super small and wrapped in plastic by the curb (It'd most likely be obvious to tell it's food category). I walk over to it and I pick it up (I know, gross right). I look at it and ask myself, "I wonder what candy/piece of candy this is or is called?

So if it appears to be something we do not know the 'group' of or specific name of it, we call it 'candy.' If I had saw a chocolate bar on the ground, I would have called it a candy bar, or most likely, a 'chocolate bar.'

2: Someone invites me over to there house. I say not right now, but they persist, and go on to say, "Please? We have candy!"

Now take note that, while they may even have chocolate with the rest of the candy, they aren't going to say, "We have candy, and some chocolate." They would just place the chocolate (which can and will sometimes be referred to as candy). They also wouldn't name each individual piece of candy they have, e.g "We have some skittles, snickers, m&ms, gum, ect."

So when many of the food 'group' is placed into one thing, and you don't want to individually name each sub category, e.g group, then you would classify it as it's category, and say "Candy."

3: Say some parents left their kids at home for a little bit, and before leaving they said, "Don't eat too much candy." This would refer back to my #2 example, where instead of just naming each thing they couldn't eat, they made it quicker and referred to it as it's 'Category,' candy. Now, even though Cake, donuts, pie, coffee cake ect, aren't classified as 'candy (some of them are 'Pastries'), the kids would know what the parents were talking about (unless they're being a smart alek), and would not eat too many 'sweets.'

So although the parents didn't say sweets, and just candy, in that sentence, 'Candy,' could also be referred to as sweets. Most people including kids, would understand that reference, so the parents wouldn't need to go on and continue to specify what they mean.

These are the main ways when we refer to candy, and, "Candy."

Hope this helps.

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Sure, but that just seems like saying if you want an apple, you'll ask for an apple. But an apple is still a fruit and a food. If you actually don't think of the things in the top picture as being part of the class of things referred to as "candy," then that would indeed be a difference.

I largely reserve the term "chocolate" / "chocolate bar" for things that are entirely chocolate. If it's a somewhat long thing merely covered in chocolate, it's probably a "candy bar." "Chocolates" (note plural), however, refers mostly to chocolate-covered smaller candies.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupoMikti

@piguy3 No no no, I'm not saying they aren't candy, I'm just saying that I don't call them candy. What I refer to it as and what it is are two different things. I know they're candy bars and that chocolates are typically entirely chocolate, it's just that it may be a regional thing, but I don't refer to them as that.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

@ LupoMikti

Hmm, I actually wouldn't say that chocolates are typically entirely chocolate. I think of "chocolates" as usually being sort of fancy candies that come in long, flat boxes and often have various types of filling.

I also would normally refer to the things in the top picture by the brand name, but the only thing there I would consider "chocolate" is the Hershey's bar, the only one that's entirely chocolate. And I don't think of any of them as "chocolates." I can't quite tell if we differ on either of these points.

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupoMikti

@JackMartian Yes, I did forget to mention what I would call the group of sweets as a whole or a mixture of several different kinds; I would indeed use the term 'candy' for that. Kinda wish more people were familiar with Group Theory and Equivalence Classes. I'd have a lot of fun trying to apply such principles of mathematics to a topic like this one.

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMartian

That sounds like fun, :). I was pretty sure you knew 'bout the grouping theme; Just making sure. Mainly though I created that for Sora_Japan, hoping to really help her understanding in 'Candy.'

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

@LupoMikti

It's fascinating that to apply such principles of mathematics. Thank you!

I can not write at the lower location of your opinion. therefore I write here.

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HexManiacSarina

I'm American and I agree with this post. Everything from hard sugar, to chocolate, to caramel, to gummy is candy to me.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

Soraさん, comparatively, 水飴 is a more fascinating word to me.

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

mysterious word appears again. 'hard sugar'. fascinating.(^O^)

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

I actually don't know what "hard sugar" means :)

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

KitKats are just chocolate covered wafer biscuits... Surely a KitKat has no relation to whatever is meant by the word "candy"? It's a biscuit (cookie) that's covered in chocolate.

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

KitKats are thin strips of cookie-like substance interspersed with what I assume is nougat. There's probably more of the later than the former, to say nothing of the substantial chocolate coating, ergo the for-sure candy parts predominate. It's also placed with candy in the store; can be bought in packaging labeled along the lines of "candy assortment"; and in any case something less than a cm x cm in cross section is too small to be a cookie. We have candy that's mostly nuts. We have candy that's nothing more than chocolate covered coconut. It's a broad category.

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

@piguy3 As far as I've noticed, there hasn't been any nougat in them at all (here in the UK at least).

KitKats have chocolate both on the outside and between each of the biscuity wafer layers.

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

The thought that "KitKat" might not be a consistent entity had crossed my mind. What we have isn't anything I would normally just call "chocolate"; it is certainly a sort of cream. I can't recall if it's a chocolately cream or not off the top of my head.

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

(^∇^)I agree! KitKats are not candy! I am eating KitKats today as well.

And I impressed the word 'layer' of 'wafer layers'. I thought that the 'layer' is only exist in the 'Photoshop' in the 'Adobe'.

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Now I remembered about the banana bar with chocolate and the candy apple in summer festival by your sentences. These are originally fruits. But it might be become 'お菓子'.

りんごあめ(candy apple) https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%82%8A%E3%82%93%E3%81%94%E9%A3%B4

チョコバナナ https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%81%E3%83%A7%E3%82%B3%E3%83%90%E3%83%8A%E3%83%8A

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

I am sorry that I can not do everything about you! But I know your great interest in sweets here!

I am writing here, because I could not reply below place.

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Inside of 'nougat' is more sticky like caramel to me. But I like nougat as well!

I wanted this comment more bottom. but I can not reply that locate.

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AcadianHipster

アメ (ame) is "sweet" and キャンディ (kyandii) is a borrowed English word, a straight fit from "candy" into katakana.

July 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Yes, I think 'アメ' is including sweets. but I don't know the definition of "candy" well.

ごめんなさい(T_T) 'アメ' is included part of sweets. アメ <  スウィーツ

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AcadianHipster

"Candy" is the overall terms for sweets like lollipops and chocolate bars, and calling a lollipop or hard caramel "candy" is correct but calling a specific chocolate bar "candy" would be incorrect because it's "chocolate." I know that's kind of confusing, but English can be a silly language. What's considered "candy" in another culture might be different as well.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

I'm glad if chocolates is distinguished from other sweets. Because I love chocolates. :D

thank you.

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

ごめんなさい(T_T) 'アメ' is included part of sweets. アメ <  スウィーツ

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miranda954978

I just wanted to say that I love seeing your questions and discussions in the Japanese course soraさん! :)

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

mirandaさん

Thank you, I appreciate that you read my strange English. Maybe it is English ... (^∇^)

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petitbanca

Very interesting. I'm Japanese. I believed "キャンディ" is candy but I didn't know chocolates are also candy until now. Nice post!

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

yes, if different word, they are not confused. of course I didn't know. :O

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seattle_Scott

The word for candy in Japanese is おかし ー お菓子。Which means confectionary. But Japanese has a lot of borrow words, so it wouldn't surprise me to see all of these words used for candy, and with different kinds of Candy. アメis sugar based candy though. Like suckers and lollipops. キャンディis also sort of the westernized word for lollipops and such. But again, I wouldn't be surprised to see them all mixed up.

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Thank you! I'm glad I can looking at the word 'confectionary' actually. I knew the word in the English words list.

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

Thank you Many comments and Yummy photos. I knew everybody love candy as same as me. I don't have confident that I can understand all English. But I can return anytime here. :D

Thank YOU!

August 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akaNathanDech

Candy in english is candy. Duh

May 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatyaCoope

Candy in English is sweets or both chocolate and sweets are confectionary.

August 28, 2019
Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.