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https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus

Common Phrases

Andrealphus
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I've done the common phrases in every language for English at some point or another and it's occurred to me that Spanish is the only one that includes asking you if you do or do not speak English and Spanish. I still don't know what "speak" in Italian is. I was wondering if there was any connection between this and the English class being American English. When I went down to South East Texas I saw a lot of distaste towards the Mexican community and while not one of them was interested in learning Spanish they all seemed to know to go, "no hablas ingles, huh?" in a snide voice to Mexicans who usually could habla ingles and were often quite helpful to us. Any thoughts?

4 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I think you are reaching. I doubt there is any connection between the Duo curriculum and Texas society. Just about everyone in the USA and Latin America knows 'habla ingles?' And 'habla español.' But not everyone speaks in a snide voice. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanbash

I like your conspiracist thinking. To speak in stereotypes here, I have this image of Texans with big belt buckles and guns saying 'Get out of our country, You took our jobs' (South park style) Another stereotype I imagine people with a southern or related 'ghetto' accent to be more judgemental. than people with the standard CNN/Fox News American accent. I think the Vigilante style border conflict is more typical of texas. I was San Ysidro, the border town between San diego and Mexico, It is like basically owned and operated by people from south of the border. I'd much rather be coming into the US through California than through Texas, though they've got the border on pretty tight lockdown at San Ysidro and I would imagine at any point where theres a border town. I have kind of a dream of helping immigrants come to the United States. That to me is like the modern Underground Railroad. I mean if the US economy would fail and we'd all be trying to get to Canada and theyd be like 'Y'all better stay out now you hear?' The US Government is doing nothing to control how many people are born within the borders or insisting that they make a certain amount of money/attain a certain level of education/speak a certain language to remain in the country, but it seems pretty determined to use those reasons to keep people out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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As I've stated, my goal is to be a pirate who can speak to the people he meets. I want to move people from poor countries, like a global coyote, for free and safe from assault. Pirates are criminals, not bad people. The two are only synonymous if your system works. Ours is messy. Keep the flames of rebellion alive where it's coldest, like in Texas. Which is ironic because they fly the "rebel" flag.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanbash

Also no property taxes if you live on a pirate ship.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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I don't think the word is only in the Spanish course so you can say that sentence, if that's what you want to imply. It's simply a useful phrase in any language and a common verb, too. I don't do the Italian tree, but I guess speaking (= parlare) is an important word to know in Italian as well, so they should really add it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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I'm absolutely sure that it is there, my point is that it only shows up in the common phrases of Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

@ "... Spanish is the only one that includes asking you if you do or do not speak English and Spanish"

"Parlez-vous français?" "Parlez-vous anglais?" Or did I misunderstand your point?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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I am saying that it is the only one that includes it in the common phrases. I am fully aware that other include it in their trees, but it usually doesn't show up until one of the verb lessons.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

Ah, OK ... you mean "Phrases" skill on the 2nd branch of the Spanish tree? I was confused as to what you meant by 'common phrases' I guess.

Keep in mind the courses were developed by different teams ... Luis, who is Hispanic, was involved with the Spanish course, so I wouldn't read too much into this. It's not like a bunch of Bubbas from Brownsville or McAllen made the decision to add that phrase so early in the lesson flow.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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I'm not saying that those people made the decision, but that their influence on language and culture did. You know what I'm saying? And "Bubbas" wouldn't be around hispanics. They are more like the people in the Tennessee and Kentucky hills. Texas is straight up redneck. Though I DO have an uncle from Texas named Billy Jack Junior and we have multiple Billy Bob's and Bobbie Joe's.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leli3
Leli3
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That phrase is VERY commonly used in the US which is why you may not have seen it that often in the other languages. This is not an educational or Duolingo thing but a societal issue. Yes, many Americans know the phrase "Hablas ingles". However, in language learning it is not taught to use this phrase in an offensive way as you pointed out. Outside of the classroom, yes , some people do use this phrase to be hurtful and insulting. There is a culture of demeaning not only Mexicans but other people that don't fully speak English. I can relate to what you saw in Texas though, as I lived there for some time as a child in El Paso. I can say however, that some people say it not knowing that it can be offensive to some people.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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I was in that huge rural stretch between Dallas and the gulf.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leli3
Leli3
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I read your comment about your country relatives and now realize that you're American, lol! I thought you were making that assumption about the "Phrases" thing from a foreigners POV. Anyways, so yeah, I know exactly what you're referring to as far as Texas culture goes and how it is in Dallas. It's very much like that in many parts of Texas. Your comments about Billy Bob's and such was hilarious, btw!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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The real beauty of the statement is the honesty, and that's my dad's side of the family. The "Bubbas" are my mom's. I live in the North but I'm straight up Southern trail mix.

4 years ago