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  5. "Gute Nacht."

"Gute Nacht."

Translation:Good night.

March 7, 2013

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtharvThapliyal

Dont let the bedbugs bacht


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brittalexiswm

Why is good night the only phrase that uses "Gute" instead of "Guten"? Is it because "Nacht" begins with an "N"? That's the way i remember it, but i would like to know if i am correct or not!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemesis_NaR

No, you aren't. It is because of declension. "Nacht" is "die", and "gute" is an adjectiv in accusativ. And because "Nacht" is feminine therefore it has to be "gute Nacht".

Other genders have to be: "Der Abend" - "Guten Abend"

"Das Mädchen" - "(Ich wünsche dir ein) Gutes Mädchen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariam.nasr

wait a minute , "gute" is feminine while "guten" is muscline , "gutes" is neutral ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemesis_NaR

In accusative, yes. You will learn more about all these declensions later on in the tree. Here in the "Greetings" lesson I would recomend you just to accept the forms as they are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorthrg

Danke, Nemesis,NaR


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OverlyNega

Danke Nemesis_NaR :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bmr209
  • 2367

Is it accusative because you are telling someone to have a good night, good evening, etc.?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemesis_NaR

Yes, it can be considered as the end of the sentence "Ich wünsche dir (eine) gute Nacht" = "I wish you (a) good night". If you used nominative, it would have been a statement, not a wish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agent187

It is called the accusative of duration of time case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krishc99

So Guten Nacht is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Banhmichuyenngu

Gute Nacht und süße Träume :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anandrkanekal

How do you pronounce the latter one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaspercat

Do you mein 'süße Träume"? Zooser troymer. Does that help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rishabv

what is the meaning of the süße Träume then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Immolatrix

Literally, "sweet dreams."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MingdeLi

What about "good evening" in German? any different between good evening and good night?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaspercat

'Guten Abend' is ' good evening'. It is used more as a 'hello', whereas 'Gute Nacht' is usually said when saying goodbye or going to bed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MingdeLi

Thanks, saw Guten Abend two questions after met Gute Nacht.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wxfrog
  • 1962

I feel like I'm watching The Truman Show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strobro3

Why is it Gute Nacht if it's Guten tag?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strobro3

is it in the dative then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaspercat

Accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strobro3

Oh yeah, brain fart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean.Ptr_Kang

It could be a "good bye" or the closing statement for a conversation. If in english like good nite. Or nite-nite


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesGoodw8

One of the words "gute" can be translated to is fine (it even lists that as an option when you tap it) however when used in your answer you get it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleM458458

How can you tell what is feminine and masculine in German? Like in Spanish it's a=feminine and o=masculine. Is there any clues?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaspercat

Unfortunately it's not that simple in German. It is best if you learn the gender along with the word. There are some clues however which can help determine the gender of some words. Take a look at this... https://www.duolingo.com/comment/575903


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoBRO

It's hard to tell if I should pronounce the ch like hard or soft. Haha. I need hearing aid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoelEbel

I get this wrong every time because now my fingers instinctively type "nicht", instead of "night".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manofsnow

How do you pronounce T's in German? In the recordings of "Guten", it sounds like a glottal stop (like in "uh-oh"). In this recording of Gute, it sounds like a D (like in "door")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaiden291084

its bad wghen ur at school and not having a mic to say it it counts u wrong when u say skip


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/munchinc

Can it also be "good evening"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaspercat

No, that is "Guten Abend"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mY7sOh8r

N then forms of sind ?, whats with these tables you don't get these on duolingo as they teach us directly?? sind is masc n seid is neuter whats fem then ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The website has tips and notes for nearly all lessons. If you are currently using a mobile app to learn, you're missing out on all the grammar explanations.

sind/seid is not influenced by masculine or feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mY7sOh8r

what is the difference between 'in ordnung' and 'Alles klar' meaning the same all right why different words?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

When someone leaves, you can say "See you!" or "Goodbye!" or "Take care!"

When someone says thank you, you can say "Don't mention it!" or "It was a pleasure!" or "You're welcome!"

Why different words?

Same reason.

The exact meaning is slightly different but those phrases can be used in similar contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mY7sOh8r

ok thanks a ton


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mY7sOh8r

then is it plural and singular ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, both are plural.

Read the grammar notes: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Basics-1


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImJittery

Why wouldn't I use Gut, instead of Gute or Guten ( I do know why i would use Gute and Guten though, Just not Gut)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Anytime an adjective is right before a noun (as opposed to after the verb, like "Die Nacht ist gut"), it needs to be conjugated according to the noun's case and gender. So since "Nacht" is feminine and accusative, we need the "-e" ending: "Gute Nacht."

"Guten" is wrong, too, since the correct ending is "-e." If we were using a masculine noun, then "guten" would be correct (e.g., "Guten Morgen").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Appai

Keep pressing the button and it sounds English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ghrislain

Error - wants German, I put in guten nacht - says wrong I want English. Do it in English, still wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoreyHammo1

Some of my voice responses are right on but the system hears it as wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimbojones733563

turn off the micrphone in your settings


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellen95887

Gute nacht , good evening or good night?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean.Ptr_Kang

Guten Abend is for good evening


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Gute nacht

It's Gute Nacht. with a capital N.

It means "Good night." It's what you would say when you are about to go to bed or someone else is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan-Dan10

How do you play dulingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noga89272

Gute Nacht is very similar to good night. Are these words from the same PIE roots or proto germanic roots?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Gute Nacht is very similar to good night. Are these words from the same PIE roots or proto germanic roots?

Yes -- they both go back to Proto-West-Germanic *gōdā nahtu (itself from Proto-Germanic *gōdǭ nahtų).

German t often corresponds to English d (e.g. gut : good; trinken : drink; Brot : bread; treiben : drive).

German ch often corresponds to English gh (e.g. Nacht : night; Licht : light [opposite of "darkness"]; leicht : light [opposite of "heavy"]; lachen : laugh; ich brachte : I brought).

Both English and German are West Germanic languages and thus evolved from a common ancestor.

Note, however, that the meanings of words have sometimes changes in the centuries since the languages split up -- for example, ich mochte and "I might" are related but no longer (usually) mean the same thing -- the German means "I liked", and while German Tier and English "deer" are related, German Tier still means "animal" while the English word has narrowed down in meaning to one particular kind of animal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daoofasaur911

It sounds like they say gute naft

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