Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Rytsas, Iōnos iksan."

Translation:Hello, I am John.

1 year ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Undergroundninja
Undergroundninja
  • 22
  • 17
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Daoruni gimi, Ionos Sonaro

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomeuRamis

Names shouldn't be translated, actually.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elilla.b
elilla.b
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 7

Depends entirely on the culture. The Romans adapted other people's names into Latin all the time, and since Valyrian is modeled on Latin, it makes every sense for names to be.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadLatinist

And I think we even have examples from the books. Consider Kraznys, which seems pretty clearly to be a Ghiscari root that has been given a Valyrian ending (in DJP's Ghiscari, krazi means "mighty.")

And while David himself often says that names shouldn't be translated, l think he is on the right track to equate the name Jonos (Braken, Frey, etc.) to Jon (Snow). Therefore we can totally say that Ionos is the High Valyrian equivalent to Jon.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens6

Interesting. Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scapeplan
Scapeplan
  • 20
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

I kind of imagine it that George RR Martin did a similar process to Tolkien, whereby he translated the actual names of characters to make the names easier for English speakers. So, like how Maura Labingi is translate to Frodo Baggins, the names of characters that are named Iōnos (or the Westerosi equivalent of the name) are "translated" to Jon.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1703

I'd say that's up to the course contributors to decide.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Damboise
Damboise
  • 18
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

yes and no their are many equivalent of the same name in different languages

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juan762265

From English to Spanish, (and viceversa): John - Juan William - Guillermo Charles - Carlos Cristopher - Cristóbal Willhemina - Guillermina Ferdinand - Fernando Henry - Enrique Louis - Luis And many more that don't come to mind

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1703

Yes, but those names are etymologically related to each other.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rene_Nyyrikki
Rene_Nyyrikki
  • 20
  • 11
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

A lot of names are also translated. Take the name "Christian" and its phonetic and orthgraphic variations across languages, for example. But I am also happy to see people struggling to pronounce my mother's name "Gertrud" in its proper Bavarian manner.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1703

Names like Christian, John, William, Charles, Louis, etc. showing up in different languages with phonetic and orthographic variations is not an example of translation. It is an example of the name being very old and staying with populations of people even as their languages evolve and diverge.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amirghost88

It shouldn't be translated, but sometimes there are differences in the pronunciation. For example, in hebrew you would say Rivka while in english you would say Rebecca. David wold be pronounced 'Da.vid' in hebrew and 'Dae.vid' in (every?) other latin language.

In any case, I think people like to be called by they're native language's pronunciation.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chantal576638

How would you pronounce Iōnos? "Yo-nose"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chantal576638

Thanks! That helps a lot :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/occitalan
occitalan
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Bend the knee.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chunkylefunga

Didn't accept Rytsas, Iōnos Aegon.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OceLots33
OceLots33
  • 14
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

I don't understand why you translate the name.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eromeon
Eromeon
  • 22
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 139

The point of Scapeplan is not unprecedented, as he has stated in other comment, Tolkien did so before.

Also, you could see that we do so always with old biblical or classical names: Marc Anthony instead of Marcus Antonius, Aristotle instead of Aristoteles, Moses instead of Moshe, and the name of most kings throughout european history.

Or the same name John, which originally was Yohanan.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OceLots33
OceLots33
  • 14
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scapeplan
Scapeplan
  • 20
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

I believe that the name is translated to Jon in order to be more familiar to English speakers. No one in Westeros or Essos is actually named Jon, but probably Martin thought it would be preferable to change the name to something reflecting an English name rather than have his books filled with high fantasy names that people would find difficult to pronounce. An exception would be the Targaryens, whose names (Daenerys, Viserys, Aerys, etc) remain untranslated in order to reflect their Valyrian heritage.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adaniel5
Adaniel5
  • 18
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

... Jon Snow is named Jon

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chunkylefunga

Not by his mother he wasn't.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sazza.g
sazza.g
  • 15
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6

Jon Arryn?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doublebullout
doublebullout
  • 17
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 43

Rytsas, Gregory iksan.

My name is already Valyrian, I think. ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadLatinist

Well, in the World of Ice and Fire there is the name Gregor, as in Gregor "The Mountain" Clegane. The name seems to be Westerosi and I don't think (but don't know for certain) that GRRM does not intend it to be of Valyrian origin (as some Westerosi names do appear to be.)

That being the case, Gregor/Gregori, declined like buzdar(i) seems most likely.

But if you spell it with a y (and, technically, pronounce it with a [y]), it COULD be a Valyrian name!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mistressof6

So does that mean that all names can be translated in High Valyrian or just simple ones???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1703

It means that George R. R. Martin and/or David J. Peterson created (whether deliberately or by chance) a small handful of names that sound similar enough to European names that they declared them functionally equivalent.

So no, not all names, but neither is it a matter of "simple".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerGilli
TylerGilli
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

I made these beautiful cave drawings for you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadLatinist

Ha. If I knew how to say that in HV, I would add it to the course ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1703

Someone needs to ask DJP for some vocabulary. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littlepal
littlepal
  • 11
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

Rytsas, Iōnos Sōnaro iksan = Hello, I am Jon Snow

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpg7115

What if I wanted to put my name?

9 months ago