"Zokla āeksio ipradas."

Translation:The wolf eats the master.

July 14, 2017

8 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emzo99

Why isn't āeksio in accusative form here? Or are they the same?

Edit: apparently āeksio is both the nominative and accusative form, if anyone else is wondering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens1

Yes! I've got it like this:

Master:

  1. Nominative: āeksio (singular), āeksia (plural).
  2. Accusative: āeksio (singular), āeksia (plural).

Apparently the conjugation works like this: https://wiki.dothraki.org/High_Valyrian_Noun_Declensions#Lunar-type:_p.C4.93ko

Hope it helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Aaeksio is master in what sense, owner of an animal, owner of a slave, lord of a fief, master of arts, maester or some combination of these?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elilla.b

It's been often used in dialogues for the Lord of Light (deity) and for the masters/owners of slaves (as in Āeksia ossēnātās, "slay the masters"), and, as you've noted, the root is used for gold. So I think we have it in the sense of owner and lord (authority). So far I've found no examples on the side of "master of arts" or "maester".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadLatinist

You'd have to ask DJP himself to be certain, but I'm pretty sure āeksio covers all those senses (OK, probably not the last two).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

Considering it also accepts 'lord', I presume the third sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I was wondering if that weren't the case, but now I see on the Dothraki wiki that the word for gold is aaeksion, so maybe it is more in the sense of owner. Of course, I may be overthinking this and it might just be intended as a direct translation of the English "master" in all contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yumal7

Down with the masters

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