https://www.duolingo.com/SamoolTheSamosa

Suggestions for next language

Is anyone leaning a language that they find fun that they would recommended

Update: I'm going to try and level up a bit in French and then I'm going to master either Dutch or German before going for a more difficult language like Russian or Hungarian

1 year ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bella.M.E

well if your looking for a challenge, I think Russian is the way to go. To me its an amazing language to learn and the people are so awesome, the language is not the easiest to learn but once you start I'm sure you wont be able to stop. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigicher

Russian! I'm addicted. And it's definitely a challenge

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BayernMunichLewi
BayernMunichLewi
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If you'd like some easy language: Spanish or German

If you'd like some difficult language: Hebrew or Vietnamese (yes, this one is really hard to me)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamoolTheSamosa

I thought German would be hard, I always see examples of really long German words that mean something that is described by like 10 words in English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BayernMunichLewi
BayernMunichLewi
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You're right. But it's easy to pronounce.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K3rnelPan1c
K3rnelPan1c
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I enjoy learning Japanese. However, Japanese is a little hard.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cheryl.wolf

You should learn Korean! It's very hard!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob20020
Bob20020
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German, Danish are cool.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samibond7

If you want a challenge, try learning English from French or Esperanto next.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Serban8comp.
Serban8comp.
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High Valyrian just came out and it is very interesting. It is a mix of Latin, English, Latin and other languages. Why don't you give it a try?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmareloTiago
AmareloTiago
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The ones I have enjoyed the most are Portuguese, Danish and Welsh.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamoolTheSamosa

Wow. How much patience do you have? If you don't mind me asking, outside of duolingo can you speak your level 25 languages fluently/nearly fluent

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmareloTiago
AmareloTiago
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Some more than others. After three years of studying Portuguese, I can read it well, I can write it fairly well but recognizing spoken Portuguese and speaking it back can be a bit of a challenge for me, mostly because of my lack of opportunity to practice.

I spoke Spanish fluently before starting Duo and I am pretty capable at reading, writing, speaking and understanding Spanish when I hear it spoken (minus a few regional accents - San Luis Potosi, Cuba, Puerto Rico). I had studied German before but would not consider myself a fluent speaker of the language. I can understand it fairly well when reading it but would not consider myself a fluent reader of German.

I read Italian fairly well but I would not say that I write it all that well. I probably understand it when spoken better than I write it. That being said, when I was working on English to Italian Immersion, I was getting pretty good at it. I am out of practice and would have to refresh considerably.

My skill with Norwegian probably falls somewhere between my skill level in German and Portuguese, with the exception of understanding spoken Norwegian, which I probably understand about the same as spoken Portuguese. I listen to Norwegian radio a lot during dinner, I have several country-specific apps that stream local radio stations and I took a particular liking to two NRK radio stations from Norway, which I think is a bit like the American NPR or the BBC. The two stations I like are their Jazz and Classical Music stations. Nothing makes a meal feel really special quite like Norwegian Jazz, even if it is just hot dogs in mac'n'cheese.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamoolTheSamosa

O.o That's an amazing story. I aspire to be like that someday. What's your first language?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LavethWolf
LavethWolf
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"Is anyone learning a language that they find fun", if I didn't find it fun, I wouldn't be learning it. Anyways, if you really want a challenge, go for something completely un-related to English. Perhaps something from the Slavic or Uralic language families. They do have some on Doulingo ( Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, Hungarian, and soon Czech ).

An even harder challenge would be to study an obscure language. Something that has a lack of information on the Internet. It feels like quite an adventure to dig around the Internet ( with caution of course ) to find some way to learn a relatively unknown language ( examples that I'm doing are Faroese and Karelian ).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamoolTheSamosa

I've never heard of Faroese or Karelian. I'll defiantly look into it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LavethWolf
LavethWolf
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Glad you're interested!, Faroese is a North-Germanic language ( which makes it distantly related to English, but is technically closer to Norwegian ) spoken in the Faroe Islands and Karelian is a(n) Uralic language ( its closes relative I believe is Finnish ). They're both quite a challenge to learn ( just trying to find a way to even begin learning these was quite problematic ).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudolfJan

Why do you want to learn another language? If you like to get a serious advice you should tell us a lot more. Which languages you speak, why you want ot learn another language . For now I only can recommend Swahili, because it is something completely different and it is spoken in the one of the most beautiful parts of the world.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Midnightwards666

My suggestion: type every language you think of into this website: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/23542313

Once, you're done, click on the ''Fruit Machine'', and go with the first language that appears.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fischerfs
fischerfs
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Hungarian is a really interesting language in the way that it differs a lot from English. You may have heard that it's one of the hardest languages in the world. While it can be more difficult than others, 'most difficult' is an extreme overstatement. It's much more regular than a lot of other languages, no genders, and it's an all-round interesting language to learn. Most of the difficult aspects are advertised as being difficult just because they don't appear in English, but I think it can be relatively easy to adapt. You should give it a go!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenshero
jenshero
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Portuguese and Turkish are cool languages :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oritteropo1
Oritteropo1
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Latin is rather fun. As an inflected language it can be quite terse and with flexible word order... a feature that I have heard that Sardinian has kept, despite losing the case endings.

It's interesting, when studying Spanish, to find parallels with English. Both have imported a whole lot of vocabulary from another distantly related language due to conquest (French and Norse in the case of English, Analusian Arabic in the case of Spanish). We also say things in exactly the same way weirdly often.

German is fun because of those wonderful compound words and their funny expressions. Actually Germans are more generally fun-loving than most English speakers give them credit for. A surprisingly large number of the Germans that venture out into the English speaking world actually speak better English than the majority of native speakers... perhaps that's a reason to defer studying German? The Dutch are very likely to know English too, but in my experience not to quite the same level (although that could just be the Dutch and Germans that I've met... Germans seem particularly good at English word games and humour).

1 year ago
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