"Please excuse me."

Translation:どうもすみません。

1 year ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Crugland1
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Not correct to say, "sumimasen onegaishimasu?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP
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No.

Sumimasen, as I heard, inherits from its origin the meaning of I can't have a peaceful mind.

Onegaishimasu means I hope that you…

So they don't go together.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crugland1
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That's good to know, and "kudasai" is something else, too? I'm confused about why "domo" comes at the start but "onegaishimasu / kudasai" are at the end.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP
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Kudasai is the Keigo (respect form) of くれ which is related to くれる To Give

お待ちになってください

Please wait (Literally: Please give me your waiting)

Domo has its origin meaning "No matter how, words can't express…". Today we can almost use it like すごくVery/Extremely. It works like an adverb so it often comes at the beginning, as we say (I am) very grateful, (I have been) very impolite. When it is used at the end it is because the "thank you" at the end is implied.

"onegaishimasu / kudasai" are verbs, so they are at the end.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DariaNicol8

Awesome explanation

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crugland1
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Thanks for the info! Maybe I'll think of it as more of an emphatic "pardon me" or like, "very excuse me!" rather than the literal word "please"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WesleyP.4

Lol, you'd basically be saying I hope you don't have a peaceful mind

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric930951

Wouldn't it mean "i hope you dont have a peaceful mind

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cameron399608

What's the difference between どうぞ, どうも, and ください? I understand all three to roughly mean "please", but I don't know the precise meaning of them and which context to use them in.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith_APP
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Just a quick and incomplete note:
どうぞ: When you give permission to the listener to do something, as if you are a host. e.g. Please (go inside my home), Please (start eating), etc.
どうも: To intensify a succeeding polite phrase. See above.
ください: To ask the listener to give you something or do something for you. e.g. お茶をください, 読んでください.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EthanDawn

how about 失礼します doesn't this also mean excuse me?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tango_michael
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They should accept it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SzaboChristopher

失礼します :しつれいします: shitsureshimasu; is understood as "please excuse me" but it is a phrase used to humble yourself. this type of Japanese is 介護:かいご:kaigo. Your right is should be accepted.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyCardoso23
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why is すみません おねがいします wrong?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blackbird910

What's the difference between すみません and ごめんなさい?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edward155636

What is the literal translation of とうも

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ava28345
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I think it's something like "very." On its own however it means "Thanks."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edward155636

*どうも

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mya730913

Correct me if I'm wrong, but shouldn't 「すいません」 be just as acceptable as 「すみません」? I've heard native Japanese speakers say it like that plenty of times before.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/okidokisoup

I looked it up and I read that 「すいません」 is kinda like a lazy way of saying 「すみません」. Like in English, we say " 'cuse me" all the time, but we really wouldn't write it like that. So maybe they won't accept 「すいません」 because they wouldn't write it like that.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blake168452

Why would domo suddenly mean the exact opposite of its original meaning?

6 months ago
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