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"I have seven younger sisters."

Translation:妹が七人います。

July 16, 2017

96 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrisvdPol

I feel sorry for this person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Touuka1

I don't know... This might be really fun, as a man who has only 1 brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bodybody123

Home sweet alabama


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaytoLv

I can't with your comment xDD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Farabi1412

At least those sisters might be happy to have a big brother . Like I do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MinnEto

I wish i had an older brother


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaRuud

How are the counters for people pronounced?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insanity54

一人 = hitori ニ人 = futari 三人 = san nin 四人 = yonin 五人 = go nin 六人 = roku nin 七人 = shichi nin 八人 = hachi nin 九人 = kyuu nin 十人 = jyuu nin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caustic.Soda

actually, 十 is just "to" not jyuunin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sinom.

Yes but no. 十 can be pronounced と and とお and is in something like 10日 (とおか) but not in 十人.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahriar392378

Correct. They're different counters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregoryEva8

That is odd how the first two don't line up with the rest!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Yes, in the earliest Japanese we can find it used to be pitori putari mituri yotari itutari mutari nanatari yatari kokonotari totari. Eventually Chinese influence caused most of the numbers as well as the counter to be borrowed from Middle Chinese and people started counting using Chinese numbers and using the Chinese reading of person, nin. But because one and two were much more used than the higher numbers, they resisted the change so that they alone remained in the modern language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hawk_

But the audio says "Nana ni imasu", where's the truth?WHERE'S THE TRUTH??

Sorry about that, sometimes I just can't help it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JapaneseSo1

i think it would be nana nin imasu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JapaneseSo1

does this follow the same pattern? so like 11 would be like jyuu hitori and and 12 would be jyuu futari and so on?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suki836576

No 1 and 2 are the only difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manilock

Nin

1 Hitori 2 Futari 3 San nin 4 yon nin 5 go nin And so on


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xandaros

四人 is actually yonin, not yonnin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaRuud

Thanks! Would it be nana-nin or shichi-nin for 7?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insanity54

七人 しちにん shichi-nin.

This page has a fun video to help memorization of people counters http://genkienglish.net/genkijapan/japanesecountersforpeople.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesFujii

Actually genius song!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeBk12

I couldn't find a video


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JapaneseSo1

why can't it be nana nin though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

Now I just need to know how to say "I am the seventh son of a seventh son."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benhyk

私は第七息子の第七息子 Watashi wa dai nana musuko no dai nana musuko


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoelMills1

I have seven younger sisters,

there is no bathtub.

Duolingo seems to be getting me ready for a living nightmare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom287916

That's what will happen if you miss your daily lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TallyBalls

imagine having 7 younger sisters


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twiztidsam

Why is the subject implied in this sentence but the sentejce before had watashi wa and this one started with imodo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FAlter5

The subject isn't implied here. 妹『が』七人います the が particle marks the subject. Note that this sentence would literally translate as "There are 7 little sisters", but with a implied topic 私は this becomes "There are 7 little sisters of mine", or you could use "exist" which in some context in English is a synonym of "be", then "7 little sisters of mine exist." Anyway, this unusual but close translations might visualize you which the subject of this sentence is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsaacChild1

In real conversation you only say the subject when it isn't clear. Some times would be with and some times without. I think the app changes it up to get us use to implied subjects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

Japanese often does not speak in full sentences but statements and quotations. A conversation which a first statement is removed is spoken as such: A: 今日は試験だ = Today has the exam B: ジョンは?= What about john? (Literally read as "john have?", impossible to translate) A: ジョンは明日 = John has his tomorrow (Literally read: John is tomorrow)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FAlter5

If you really want to be as literal as possible, while maintaining basic grammar off the target language (English), as long as it is specified - A: (as of) today, an exam is - B: (as of) John...? - A: (as of) John, tomorrow... - Japanese is a bit about reading between the lines.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caustic.Soda

Proper English grammar would have it said as: (as for) John, (as for) John, tomorrow, etc..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

Well, it is intranslatable, it does not really have an english equivalent as its translation changes from sentence to sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

I believe は is best translated as "has" in the context, as it indicates both importance and ownership, such as へやにいすはX the chair/s [within] the room [have the property...] X


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TNicole6

I used 七人いもうとがいます。It was marked wrong. Is there a specific reason, or just a matter of preference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

It is wrong, as you have committed yodaspeech. "7 people sister i have" might be understandable, but it's wrong, plus you're missing たち.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FAlter5

The grammar is missing, but imo you are wrong in the missing of たち because there is no difference in singular and plural in Japanese and 妹たち means more something like a group around the/my little sister.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

I asked a native speaker, and the difference of imoutotachi and imouto is basically "siblings(of sisters)" and "sisters", it's not necessarily required as you say, however.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikutard

(笑) That got me x´D

But I thought "yodaspeech" was acceptable if the particles are in the right places, like とcoupling stuff も near subject か at the end of sentences etc.

This is something wrong to infer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elementart_

You can say it this way, but you have to add 「の」after 「七人」

Essentially, you can say either "Counter の noun が (あり)ます" or "Noun が counter (あり)ます"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CristianCu298295

Why can't I start the sentence with "私の"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caustic.Soda

の is used to define possession. This sentence is stating that the speaker (you) has 7 younger sisters. Not that your sisters have a quantity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dravitar

Ok, thats just strangely specific. I have seven younger sisters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

This is the norm in all language learning. It's about learning how to construct sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/languagen3rd69

いもうと七人がいます。??? in class, we learned that ga would come before imasu???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

You said "7 sisters has i have"。You are forgetting how the language works. います is a verb, and いもうとが7人 is an object. The fact that they are your's is already implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver747900

Your attempt at correction is unfortunately incorrect.

が is the subject marker, and it marks whatever comes before it as the subject.

If the sentence begins with いもうとが then いもうと is the subject, and が is marking that subject.

The 七人 part goes with the verb います and is neither part of the subject nor the object of the verb. (This verb is intransitive, which means that it cannot take an object at all.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

Nothing should be between the counter and the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

No, because the "ga" is pointing out the subject. In the sentence "I have seven sisters", the subject is just the sisters, not the seven. If the seven was part of the subject, the sentence would be something like, "My seven sisters...". In this sentence, seven is describing the sisters, like "Sisters: there are seven." So "ga" only marks the subject, which the seven isn't a part of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noritamayo

Probably works if 'imouto' is separated by a comma..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

妹が7人います is not accepted, despite valid. (妹=younger sister)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

I think it would need a "wa" or a "ga" between "imouto" and "shichi-nin" to be a valid sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMGX4H

I'm guessing the speaker is a big daddy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikutard

Future lesson: "Write this in Japanese" - "I go look for angels with my 7 younger sisters"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dai803021

Is it just me? In a katakana question, "re" and "ve" sound exactly the same. That makes this question a 50-50 crap shoot! And apparently "an error occurred", preventing me posting a comment. No matter how many times I attempted to post the comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikutard

No, it can and does happen sometimes. Go with your gut and report when you suspect it's the case. Japanese phonemes aren't lacking to distinguish those two but they do lack distinction for L-R sounds and don't even have hard Rs I believe.

Occasional person making an honest report mistake won't be problematic. This question would be better suited in the general Japanese discussions though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pierra18

The kanji corresponding to seven wasn't available


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

It is. When using ime, type 7, press space twice, and select it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClayWhipp

Whys is が used instead of は?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caustic.Soda

The 「私は」is omitted at the beginning since it's implied you're talking about yourself. が is used to indicate the subject under the topic. So using sentence flow: On the topic of myself, in regards to my sisters, there are seven of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

The が&は particle usage will confuse you forever and unfortunately there is not always a clear-cut answer. The only way to learn the quirks of it is to read, read, read.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

The main difference between wa and ga as particles is that wa is used when the subject has already been established. Basically, it depends on context. If you were already talking about sisters previously in the conversation, you would use wa. If you are just bringing up your sisters, you would use ga. Because you don't have this beforehand context on Duolingo, it is hard to say which you should use. However, in this particular sentence, wa would mark you, the speaker and topic; watashi wa, and then you'd naturally use ga after the subject, the sisters. In this example, the topic is omitted along with the wa, but you still use ga after the sisters. When a sentence would start with a person and go on to be about something else, the wa would mark the topic and the ga would mark the subject. Sorry my wording is a little weird there. Basically, take the sentence "I have seven little sisters". It starts with you, "I", but the main point or subject of the sentence is the sisters. Wa points out the topic and ga emphasizes the subject. In conversation, you'd be understood either way, but it's good to know the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arielnmz

I used ha(wa) instead of ga and got it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caustic.Soda

Because it is wrong. は is used to indicate the topic, が is used to indicate the subject. The topic of the sentence is you, and the subject is the sisters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

The main difference between wa and ga as particles is that wa is used when the subject has already been established. Basically, it depends on context. If you were already talking about sisters previously in the conversation, you would use wa. If you are just bringing up your sisters, you would use ga. Because you don't have this beforehand context on Duolingo, it is hard to say which you should use. However, in this particular sentence, wa would mark you, the speaker and topic; watashi wa, and then you'd naturally use ga after the subject, the sisters. In this example, the topic is omitted along with the wa, but you still use ga after the sisters. When a sentence would start with a person and go on to be about something else, the wa would mark the topic and the ga would mark the subject. Sorry my wording is a little weird there. Basically, take the sentence "I have seven little sisters". It starts with you, "I", but the main point or subject of the sentence is the sisters. Wa points out the topic and ga emphasizes the subject. In conversation, you'd be understood either way, but it's good to know the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will365974

Why is ga used here instead of wa as the particle? Is it because imouto is being established in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

yes, that's why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

Why did the voice pronounce 人 as shito? Wouldn't it be nin here? And 七 would be shichi, but it was pronounced as nana?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanC793213

When pronouncing individual kana or kanji (when you click them in the prompt) it always defaults to the same pronunciation (as if it were written alone, not part of another word). Look up "kun-yomi' vs 'on-yomi' for more detail than you might want on that.

If the automatic audio said 'shito' or 'nana', you'll probably want to report that as "Audio did not sound right".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aj.legarde

Can you use 姉妹 in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikutard

No for this specific case because you're pointing out that they are all younger than you.

Yes if you meant to say only sisters.

And no again if you meant to say brothers and sisters and/or be ambiguous (siblings) : "兄弟 (きょうだい)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanku2

Check button too sensitive even b4 typing complete answer just hovering over it renders incorrect and docks a point


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielJone923748

so jelly of this MC-kun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruv_77

They must really take care of u


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenn707

I wrote the same sentence but using は instead of が, shouldn't it be accepted as well? Why is necessarily Ga in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elementart_

Since は marks the topic (the speaker, 私, which is ommited since it's implied) and が marks the subject (the sisters), only the latter is correct and can be used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

Because wa would mark you, the speaker; watashi wa. (ignore my romaji, I'm on a computer.) The speaker is omitted here, so it's confusing, but you would still use ga for the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kuko49485

I CLICKED CHECK BY ACCIDENT IM GONNA CRY


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dazel

You poor bastard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiousoueu

Why noy use いむうとたち?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

Because it's wrong in every single way. imuuto doesn't even mean anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caustic.Soda

That says imuuto but yes, it's still wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

you know what they mean, really.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shade737

I think you mean imouto, but you don't have to put the tachi at the end. You add tachi when you're talking about a group of people, but in this sentence, you are establishing a group. Like just imouto could be singular or plural, and when you start the sentence with imouto ga, people don't know how many; then you say shichi nin imasu, and you establish that there are seven of them. I don't know if that makes sense exactly, my wording is a little weird, but hopefully it's helpful.

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