"It is there."

Translation:そこにあります。

July 16, 2017

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/unklethan

I get that we don't use です here, but i don't know why we use あります。Any tips there?

July 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Artist18

Though I've learned that あります (and います) expresses "being," I think I once read something about it also kind of meaning "to exist" (not literally though since there's an actual verb for that). Even if that's not the case, thinking of it that way really helps me because it lets me distinguish between it and です.

Example: If I see something like '椅子が二つあります (aka いすが二つあります)' I think "Two chairs exist" therefore "There are two chairs." Or in this particular example's case, my thought process is 'そこにあります’ = "Something exists there" = "It is there". To me it differs from です because that would just mean generally "It is there" but not that something is actually existing/present there.

It helps me with います too because then I can think of something like '姉がいます (aka あねがいます)' as "An older sister exists" so it could mean either "I have an older sister" or "There is an older sister" since I at least know one exists.

Sorry the explanation was kind of long but I hope it helps!

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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Yeah, there are two different concepts rolled into one verb in English - one that describes something ("the cat is cute") and one that says that something exists ("there is a cat here"). Other languages have multiple verbs for expressing these ideas - Japanese is one of them

So yeah, です is the describing verb (it's called a copula) and いる and ある are both "thing exists" verbs. If you need to say that something exists (which includes "there are (exist) X number of things") you use いる or ある. It's pretty simple once you get the idea of description vs existence into your head

The other thing to watch out for is, again, English using the same word for two different ideas! You might have noticed that when we say something exists we say "there is" or "there are". It's just part of the phrasing. This is different from using there to describe location. "There is a cat" vs "the cat is there"

But in Japanese, when you describe location, you're effectively saying "this thing exists at this place". So you still use いる and ある, because the idea is being phrased in terms of existence, not description. If that makes sense? That's a long way of saying YOU JUST DO OK but I think it helps to understand the ideas behind the languages, it gets a lot easier to make sense of things!

June 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceAndWar208
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So why could we use ~です in the last few sentences? There are sentences that use です after ここ、そこ、あそこ after all.

July 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/awelottta

You can use です to describe something with an adjective, e.g. "The cat is black."

I think that the same could work for describing where something is located. You could either say, "The cat exists over there," and use and adverb (猫がそこにいます), or you could say, "The cat IS over there," and use an adjective (猫はそこです), where the location becomes a property of the cat.

I might be mistaken though.

August 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jekahog

Trying to piece that together as well lol

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kurogyo
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そこにあります what is the に for here?

July 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Artist18

From my understanding, に is used when locations are involved, and you use it after the location the action references to. In this case, そこ is the location, so you place に after it to show that's where the item "exists". Hope that helps!

July 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kavaeric
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Is it also the same reason why に is also used when saying you're doing something at some time (ex "I'm sleeping at midnight")?

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthias1414
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に is a particle to indicate a certain location or time. In the latter case it is translated as "at" like in "at 3 o'clock".

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MaruHigdon

Sooo, this doesn't account for the difference between ある and いる. Leaving out the subject when it could potentially change the verb is VERY important

March 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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Right, but it is omitted in the sentence, so you have to roll with it. And sure, it's possible that it refers to an animal, but in general most things you refer to as it are going to be inanimate, and need ある

Duolingo has to strike a balance between "is this possibly an accurate translation in some circumstances" and "is the student demonstrating that they understand this concept". The difference between いる and ある is an important one, and they have to be careful that they're not accepting answers from people who aren't using the correct verb. It might seem like an unfair limitation sometimes, and a bit artificial in how you have to word your answers, but this is a teaching tool in the end

You can always report stuff if you genuinely think it should be accepted - like I said you're not wrong, but they might have made a conscious decision not to accept that translation

June 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Amawaku
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I thought that "there" was said "それ" or "あれ"... Why is it that there is only "そこ", which I believe means "that"?

What is the "it" part and what is the "there" part in "そこにあります"...?

October 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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I think you've got it backwards. In general そこ means "there", while それ means "that".

There is no "it" in the Japanese sentence, but English sentences need a subject. Since the verb is あります and not います, we know the subject is a nonliving thing, so we can use it.

November 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/smashingparadox

How would you say, "It is in there"?

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyKira
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What is the difference between あそこ and そこ?

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Tafeja
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"soko" is near to someone who you are talking with and "asoko" is equally far from both of you

March 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Tytycoon

Asoko is used for things 'over there', far away from the speaker and those they are speaking to. Soko is used for things next to the speaker or the listenener

March 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kenttiristi

I used そこにありますよ

December 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hexonoid
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I said あそこですand it accepted it. When I think about it, this is almost the same thing, but can be different or the same depending on the circumstance. Mainly, like how far away the object is.

January 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhodii

When I was given this question, they only gave me the option to use "masu" and not "desu"... so I don't really know what's going on. I wanted to use "desu" but they had no box for it and then I got it wrong.

March 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Boulbik

Why is ここにありますwrong?

May 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthias1414
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It would translate as "It is here." ここ here に particle of space あります to be for inanimate things

May 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard490425

Previously it listed "the house is over there" as いえはあそこです so why isn't "it is there" just あそこです? です wasn't on the list of options to choose.

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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いえはあそこです (ie wa asoko desu) and いえはあそこにあります (ie wa asoko ni arimasu) mean the same thing and are basically interchangeable. Different sentences are just teaching you different ways of saying things. If you type your own answer, both are accepted.

November 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CG9x7mTu

I sort of wish そこです wasnt accepted and the sentence to translate was slightly less vague.

Maybe if there was italicized or changed to "located there" it would get the point across. This question came in a practice session, so there wasn't any context for what the answer should have been unless you remembered...which would be scary. Accepting a grammatically impoverished answer is not ideal when you're trying to get a point across.

Oh well, by the time they have us saying it's on top/inside/next to, it will be required.

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/missy772881

I didn't even click enter yet. Nor finish filling in my answer

March 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeJ87

Shouldn't あそこです be correct too?

January 6, 2019
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