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  5. "おはよう、おばあさん。"

"おはよう、おばあさん。"

Translation:Good morning, Grandmother.

July 16, 2017

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kittycat2223

That sounds weird. It sounds like it says, "おはよう、おばさん."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ever2662

Christ, thank you. I ended up going with "good morning, aunt" because of this. ETA: now the text actually reads おばさん, but it still won't accept "aunt" as an answer. Um.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnBurns882492

me too, the recording is closer to おばさん then おばあさん


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toraku72

This is a bug, right? Because it sounds much like "おばさん" than "おばあさん".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

The audio I listened to at the top of this thread sounds correct to me, but the difference between the two is very subtle. I don't know how to describe it well, but the emphasis is different in each word.

ばあさん (the "ba" is the emphasized syllable, with the voice falling on "san")

おばさん (there's a rising intonation starting at "ba" and continuing into "san")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

おはよう、お婆さん


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

お婆さん = senior citizen

お祖母さん = grandmother

おばあさん is usually just written in kana, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe277235

I know this depends on the relationship between the speaker and the grandmother, but this feels too informal somehow. "ございます" at the end would be more proper, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akira386

Yes, the combination of informal + formal (―さん) seems strange. おはよう、おばあちゃん or おばあさん、おはようございます would be more typical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigRigz1

What contrasts おばあさん and おそぼさん? The latter is a new one for me, and the former is which I knew as the name for someone else's grandma, with そぼ being one's own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Yeah, I knew about "obaasan" before, and then the explanation before the lesson confirmed it. And then, suddenly, "osobosan" smacked me upside the head and had me confused. My guess is that it's more polite? I don't know; this is my first time hearing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Where are you seeing "osobosan"? This is not correct Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigRigz1

...It is in this lesson. Is it wrong? For Duolingo's sake, it would not be surprising. I think that is what an audio file said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

For me, at the top of this discussion I see the translation listed as "おはよう、おばあさん。", and the TTS reads the sentence as "ohayou, obaasan." There is no kanji involved, but did the sentence you encounter maybe use the kanji お祖母さん, and it was read as "osobosan"? This would most likely be part of a known error where the automatically generated audio sometimes selects the wrong reading of the kanji (祖母 by itself is "sobo", but お祖母さん is read "obaasan"). The developers haven't figured out how to stop this yet, so it's always helpful when you recognize that the audio is incorrect to report it in the ways described in this post: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/32352336


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigRigz1

That makes sense; I saw 祖母 as sobo, and saw the same in お祖母さん, and assumed the audio file was correct in it being "osobosan", in the understanding that I do not understand the extent of the Japanese language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

I saw it in the "tips" section before starting this lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I checked the tips for the web version and it says "お祖母さん (おばあさん)" with no sound. I checked the iPhone version tips and it didn't even list a word for "grandmother". Are you using Android?

For anyone who comes across it, I would submit a bug report to bring it to someone's attention: https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/requests/new


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

I'm using a PC. Also, it was something I was wondering when I read the tips section. I only heard it when the aforementioned kanji was used. I'm just saying that every time I've heard someone refer to someone's grandparent or an older person, it was (o)baa-san/chan and (o)jii-san/chan (and sometimes oyaji for the men, I think.) So I was wondering about its use in general, not specific to this particular question posed by Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I'm sorry, I think we were talking about two completely different things. "Osobosan" is not a correct Japanese word, but maybe you're asking about the difference between "obaasan" and "sobo"?

As BigRigz1 said, 祖母 (sobo) is talking about your own grandmother. It's a humble word for polite conversation. お祖母さん (pronounced "obaasan" and usually just written in hiragana as おばあさん) refers to someone else's grandmother, or you can use it to talk about your own grandmother when speaking to someone in your in-group.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

(Again, Duo's not letting me reply directly to your comment, so I'm replying in this way.)

@IsolaCiao

Ahh, okay, that makes a lot more sense! Thanks for explaining that to me. So "Obaa-san" is how you're supposed to read it when it has "o" before it and "-san" at the end, because it's honorific speech, but "sobo" is like saying "Gran" or "Granny" and is a more familial term used specifically for talking to her or to someone in your out-group, because you're taking a humble position/putting her in a humble position. But "obaa-san" is for in-group, and maybe when talking to her in order to show respect.

Do I have that right, now?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You've got the idea, I would just say that you wouldn't usually call your grandmother 祖母 (sobo) because exactly as you've said you're putting her in a humble position and it could come off as rude to her. If you're talking directly to your grandmother, you should call her おばあさん (obaasan) to show respect, or if you have a closer relationship you might call her おばあちゃん (obaachan) to show more affection. Little kids often call their grandmothers ばあば (baaba).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

@IsolaCiao

Okay, I get it now. Thanks! I appreciate all the time you spent helping me out. I think I understand how to address grandmothers now, and can probably just use the male equivalent for grandfathers. Goodness, though, Duo needs to clean up their misleading tip section for this lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Happy to help. If you're interested, one of the contributors explained why they're not updating the tips right now here: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/35492212?comment_id=35761649


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanaOBlingo

i swear to mfg the male voice says obaasan and obasan differently in the selections than how it is said in the sentence, it drives me absolutely bonkers and i always second guess myself


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sef467066

Please fix: translating おばさん as grandmother, rather than aunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

This is what I see at the top of this thread:

"おはよう、おばあさん。"

Translation:Good morning, Grandmother.

Did you encounter something different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sef467066

I was given, "おはよう、おばさん。" which I translated as Good morning, Aunt; however Duo (mobile app) would only accept Good morning, Grandmother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I see, since it brought you to this sentence discussion for おはよう、おばさん, you may have encountered a bug. When strange things like that happen, it's usually best to take a screenshot and submit a bug report: https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/requests/new


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mango-boi

Is Grannie wrong to use? Doesn't it mean grandmother as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5lTGqjPo

I think the more usual spelling would be granny (of which the plural is grannies). However, when it is used as a proper noun (as it is in this sentence) I think some families might use Grannie. After all, what different families call their grandparents differs, as is evident in this thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I would submit an error reporting saying "my answer should be accepted" and see if the contributors will add it. If they don't, I think the reason would be that "Grannie" sounds like an affectionate name, versus おばあさん, which is a formal way to address your grandmother. Japanese has more affectionate ways to address your grandmother (ばあちゃん・ばあば) which might work better for "grannie", I'm just not sure how strict the contributors are about the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

I agree. Basically, it needs to be reported since I don't see how this would really be incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UsamahAghis

Why's grandmother capitalized here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

It's capitalised because you're talking to her, where "Grandmother" here is what you're using as her name.

Where's John?
Where's Dad? (Ex. asking a sibling)
Where's my dad? (Ex. asking a friend)
Where's your dad?

Capitalised when used as a name; lower case when used as just a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

Calling your grandmother "Grandmother" seems extremely odd to me.

While calling your mother "Mother" is just uncommon, calling your grandmother "Grandmother" sounds like something that has never happened in the history of the English language! Maybe this is just me though. :D

Does anyone on here call their grandmother "Grandmother"? Has anyone ever called their grandmother "Grandmother"? Would it feel normal to say "Good morning, Grandmother" to your grandmother?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5lTGqjPo

I called my father's parents Grandmother and Grandfather, and my father called them Mother and Father so it sounds quite normal to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacobgkau

My grandparents on my dad's side of the family were Grandma and Grandpa; my grandparents on my mom's side were Grandmother and Grandfather. It was quite convenient for us, because we could easily tell them apart in conversation.

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