1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "このみせでいちばん高いおかしがほしいです。"

"このみせでいちばん高いおかしがほしいです。"

Translation:I want the most expensive snack in this shop.

July 17, 2017

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikRamakrishnan

The dog is now rich after selling all those hats.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronCYA

でも、その犬はしんでいます。。。

(But, the dog is dead...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tobyflint

Perhaps that most expensive snack was a chocolate cake... with too much butter put...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashley457984

The dog worked itself to death selling hats. This is Doulingo with his blood money.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmyONeil

You can't trick a dog with inferior treats. Their noses are just too good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

この店で一番高いお菓子が欲しいです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

Can I has diamonds sushi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nemo261193

I translated it as "treats" but it was wrong... any idea why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dante.I.

It could be duo's mistake...

But, thinking about this question, ichiban is usually translated as 'most', although it literally means 'number one'.

If we use that meaning and translate the sentence to 'number one (most) expensive treats', it is incorrect in english because number one requires a singular noun due to the fact that there's only one number one.

I'm not 100% sure though that the japanese use it to explicitly mean number one, I'd need a native speaker to confirm that...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e.freed.2432

Duolingo is very inconsistent with its translation of お菓子。Both treat and snack are correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vitaoTM

おかし doesn't mean "odd"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

As Daniel said, お菓子 (おかし) refers to confections, sweets, or candy. おかしいmeans "funny/amusing" or "strange/unusual/weird".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kurobeau

i believe thats おかしい and contextually can also mean amusing, among other things aswell.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xannyeong

This is something my spoilt evil half sister will say


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thkgk

"I want the most expensive sweets in this store." should also be correct.

お菓子means: confections; sweets; candy​


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philallthethings

ice cream with gold flakes :o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie592508

why is "from this shop" not acceptable? The japanese does not specifically say IN the shop (mise no naka) but uses DE which indicates location or method of action.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wires_Ali

To the best of my knowledge: At the shop - 店 (みせ) で From the shop - 店から


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seolh1

I initially translated it this way, and have the same question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelise_627

I think that either "in" or "from" can probably be used. However, if you are interested in learning more about how "de" can be used, check out Japanese Grammar page 54.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

I like this sentence a lot. There are a lot of pieces to it, but I can understand it, and that makes me feel good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloyd76445

Someone has high standards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NRose8

Is おかし acceptable for any snack? Potato chips, peanuts, raisins, a Hot Pocket, etc? I always heard it specifically for candy, sugary sweets, chocolate, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

It is specifically cakes, sweets, and candy. It does not include other snacks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne624050

Even though it is mainly used for sweets, it also includes salty snacks, especially senbei. The japanese Wikipedia article categorizes potato chips, popcorn and the like as スナック菓子. But in conversations both スナック and おかし is used (source: talking to native speakers)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DEcobra11

Go big or bust kid!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myrmeca

Why is "of this store" wrong ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e.freed.2432

That would be お店の一番高いお菓子。The particle で means "in" or "at", while の is possessive and would mean "of this store".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akylina6

They need to be more consistent in their word translations... I got corrected for translating おかし as "sweets" the first time, have been translating is as "treat" ever since and now it corrects me again to "snack"....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imnuts7

Snacks would be better translated as おやつ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael471689

お菓子(おかし) = "sweets" rather than "snack".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelise_627

My Japanese friend taught me this word and she translated it as "snack". So maybe it depends on where you are in Japan.

Another word for snack is お八つ (おやつ).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImADorkIDo

ときどき。。。高い物事はもっと悪い。。。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulJones279857

The sound appears to be broken here. It's pronouncing 'de' as 'ni' 28/2/19


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/owl30417

可笑しいお菓子


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuhZakir

Why not, "please give me"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimori87

Isn't で used when an action is being performed at the location? Since it's saying that it just wants something from the store, wouldn't に be a better particle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roshihara

But WHY would you want the most expensive snack in this store?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael378006

このみせでちばん他かよい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinicius913771

Sometimes duo wants a specific context, but we have to guess which it is...

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.