"Everything comes to those who wait."

Translation:Tout vient à point à qui sait attendre.

7/17/2017, 11:59:29 PM

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/carolekolb
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This is an idiom, not a direct translation

9/18/2017, 1:39:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/morgainelafee
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Is the 'à point' really necessary here or simply idiomatic?

7/22/2017, 10:47:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
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We are given here two idiomatic phrases, one as it would be said in English, the other as it would be said in French. So the translation is not word for word.

In the French, the "à point" means something like "just in time": "Everything comes just in time (in the nick of time) to those who know how to wait".

That concept of "just in time" is not present in the English idiom, nor is the concept of "knowing how" to wait as opposed to just waiting.

9/9/2018, 10:50:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Fekkezaum
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"Tout vien à ceux qui attendent" is not accepted. Why?

What's the point of this sentence anyway? Frustrating people?

10/24/2017, 7:38:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Tony979198
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you have a spelling error (vien = vient) in your sentence, but other than that I also submitted: "tout vient à ceux qui attendent" and it was rejected of course. I think that this should be a good translation of the English sentence. If they expect this to be translated into an idiom, then it probably should be presented that way to the English speakers. But it's pointless to spend time on frustration. The main goal is to learn another language by experience. Frustration can "rub in" the correct answer if you can see it that way.

12/20/2017, 10:20:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Is this a ballet thing?
Or eventually people make sense?

7/17/2017, 11:59:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/grammalynnie

I think it is very unfair of duolingo to expect us to know French idioms when we haven't been taught them. Obviously "to know how" to wait is assumed in English. How are we supposed to know that you need "savoir" when translating into French if we haven't been taught this?

8/9/2017, 8:16:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sejasci
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The whole point of having us translate it, is that we learn these phrases. Duolingo works with the method of 'learning by doing' without having to study grammar, idioms or vocab separately. Making (a lot of) rookie mistakes while translating sentences the first time(s) around is part of that method.

12/20/2017, 1:10:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda4406

Sorry, but there is another less "punitiive" way to teach idioms. There aren't that many of these expressions in each section. All they need to do is list the idioms in the tips and people can choose whether or not to go over them beforehand. Much less discouraging. Slaps on the hand as a teaching technique not generally endorsed as a teaching method.

12/29/2018, 3:06:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/fH6lclhu
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I agree. How else would we learn something new if we are limited to the stuff that we already have known? There is nothing 'unfair' about this? One has a choice to quit and join another course that is not challenging.

1/7/2018, 1:12:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/eduard830406

I agree

5/23/2018, 9:10:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevin968039

I don't think duo 'expects' us to know. I DO think we are asked to learn (if we choose to). If we already knew the answers there would be no purpose- no reason for being here to begin with. I know it can be frustrating- Duo knows it can be frustrating (we all know). Take a moment. Breathe. Relax. Then keep going when you're ready. You can do this.

12/8/2018, 3:34:57 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Robin944909

Amen!!!!!

4/5/2018, 12:43:49 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/EvAxvB

It sounds like a ballet thing, but this might help us to learn it. Listening to the musicality, the tone seems to go up on the "...à point..." then comes the second part with the tone going down to "...sait attendre..." at the end. So hopefully we will eventually recognise the idiom. I like the explanation of ion1122 above.

2/27/2019, 11:45:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyRickell

'Tout vient a ceux qui attendent' - should be accepted here?

8/30/2018, 12:27:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/M.parlange
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All I want to know is: Does "Tout vient à ceux qui attendent" make any sense in French? Thanks for any help

1/18/2019, 5:11:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/bibliom
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Does anyone know why savoir is conjugated here? I know this is an idiom... but I would still like to know the grammar that would allow for conjugating the second verb.

1/19/2019, 3:08:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda4406

Hi, you have a whole separate (dependent) clause here of which qui is the subject and "sait" is its verb. To match savoir to its subject, qui, it must be in the 3rd person singular, as qui is. "Qui sait attendre" translates literally to "who knows (how) to wait." Hope that helps, I'm an amateur.

1/19/2019, 4:15:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/bibliom
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thank you

1/19/2019, 7:17:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertShaw407938

What does this have to do with science?

3/8/2019, 9:33:39 AM
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