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  5. "Hai programmi per stasera?"

"Hai programmi per stasera?"

Translation:Do you have plans for tonight?

March 7, 2013

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dnovinc

Which one is more common: "Hai programmi per stasera?" or "Hai piani per stasera?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocco275616

più comune "hai programmi per stasera?"

with "piani" I would change a bit the phrase: "Che piani hai per stasera?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/die7fox

"Stasera" means "this evening." It should be accepted here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marziotta

Report a suggestion in the report field to add another translation. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swampsparrow

It is on 2014-07-14.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocco275616

Same meaning but "programmi" sounds better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew2569

In my experience, saying "I have plans tonight" in English (New England, USA) is identical in meaning to "I have plans for tonight." DuoLingo does not accept this. Reported 1/16/15.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike638370

My translation "Have you plans for this evening?" was not accepted.

Duolingo response "You missed a word - Have you go plans for this evening?"

Reported 07.08.17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Italianrosi

It should be got plans not go plans


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thatsfuctit

Have you got plans for this evening. Rejected. I’m English by the way, and that is a normal way of asking that question. Things like this make me think about paying for Babel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jpiccolo92

Why is the partitive article omitted here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan193101

'Have you plans for tonight?' is the way many English people would ask the question. The construction "Do you have...?" is more American. DL can be very irritating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blomeley

I always thought that 'program' was an acceptable translation for this. It's a synonym of 'plan' in english too. Is there a particular reason its not an accepted translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Possibly because 'Do you have programs for tonight?' doesn't make as much sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conradsteenkamp

Do you have programs for tonight makes a lot of sense. One could be talking about printed programs for some or other show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Well, if you look below it appears that it may be accepted now. I'm not sure if programmi is that sort of programs. But it might be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duomail

“Do you have programs for this evening?“ is accepted. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muyil

Speaker's voice does not indicate a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

It's a bit tricky for computerised voices yes. Why is that a problem anyway? It doesn't require you put the question mark in to get it accepted and Italian doesn't phrase it differently for questions and statements anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mabelle16

there was not the word 'any' in Italian to translate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike638370

Tried again with "Have you got plans for this evening?"

Duolingo response " You used a wrong word -Have you go plans for this evening?"

Reported again


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pattyplum

I'm having the same problem. My translation of 'Have you plans for this evening' was wrong according to DL. They say the correct translation is 'Have you go plans for this evening'. As a native English speaker this is a new one on me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/High_Ho

My correction has "go" in it????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan193101

"Have you plans for this evening?" was marked incorrect but it means exactly the same thing as the translation given (albeit more naturally in British than American English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoisMcEwan

Have you got still rejected

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